Re: The "right" to "own" knowledge - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: The "right" to "own" knowledge - Linux ; On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 00:53:49 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote: > - An application for a Dutch patent (i.e. your invention is only protected > in the Netherlands) costs some $140 a for six-year-patent and $650 for a > twenty-year-patent ...

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Thread: Re: The "right" to "own" knowledge

  1. Re: The "right" to "own" knowledge

    On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 00:53:49 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:

    > - An application for a Dutch patent (i.e. your invention is only protected
    > in the Netherlands) costs some $140 a for six-year-patent and $650 for a
    > twenty-year-patent -- if you write it yourself, that is. An application in
    > this form is completely worthless, not only because it only covers the
    > Netherlands, but also because most inventors aren't lawyers. Sure, if
    > you're up to the task of getting the legalese airtight enough to deter
    > possible infringers, and succesfully carry out your own novelty research,
    > then it's pretty cheap.


    Wow. This is the same argument that closed source people make about open
    source. That it's only useful if you're up to the task of doing it
    yourself and having the knowledge to pull it off.

  2. Re: The "right" to "own" knowledge

    Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 00:53:49 +0200, Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    >> - An application for a Dutch patent (i.e. your invention is only
    >> protected in the Netherlands) costs some $140 a for six-year-patent and
    >> $650 for a twenty-year-patent -- if you write it yourself, that is. An
    >> application in this form is completely worthless, not only because it
    >> only covers the Netherlands, but also because most inventors aren't
    >> lawyers. Sure, if you're up to the task of getting the legalese airtight
    >> enough to deter possible infringers, and succesfully carry out your own
    >> novelty research, then it's pretty cheap.

    >
    > Wow. This is the same argument that closed source people make about open
    > source. That it's only useful if you're up to the task of doing it
    > yourself and having the knowledge to pull it off.


    This is true for a certain value of "doing it (or IT?) yourself" -- a value
    which has dropped from the rather daunting "Your first step is compiling
    the kernel" to a DIY installation which consists of perhaps ten mouse
    clicks (mostly on "Next", at that), coming up with two passwords, and one
    reboot. These days, installing any of the major Linux distributions is
    hardly more difficult than installing a single closed source application,
    and the ease-of-use is comparable to what Windows and Macintosh have to
    offer.

    So in effect, this whole DIY argument is bogus, and there are far better
    examples where doing things yourself may appear to be vastly cheaper, but
    are to be discouraged nonetheless -- things such as defending yourself in
    court or building your own house.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl

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