What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs? - Linux

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Thread: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

  1. What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost
    a year of trying.

    Maybe three's the charm?

    Here goes again...

    I have an old machine, not my main machine, nearly in mothballs that
    somebody uses on occasion to surf the net and print a letter on a
    recent model HP inkjet using OpenOffice as the word processor
    program. The machine is running on Windows 2000. The machine is an
    Intel Pentium II, about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or maybe
    it's 225, I upgraded it but forgot what it was, but I'm pretty sure
    it's 512 MB). The C: hard drive is only 2 GB large--the only one for
    the OS. This was a popular configuration in the mid to late 90s so
    I'm sure a lot of these machines exist in the world, so somebody must
    have loaded Linux on one of them.

    The machine has no DVD, only a CD reader. It has a late 90s but
    popular video card, forget the brand.

    What Linux distro to use for this configuration? I can, using another
    PC, download a distro, but then I would have to burn it onto a CD or
    CDs, so I would rather not do that--that is, I would rather get or buy
    a Linux distro that is already burnt, in proper order, onto labeled
    CDs to make installation easier.

    In case you're wondering why I want to switch to Linux: though the NT
    system is functional, it's slow, and rumor has it that Linux is 'virus
    free' (or nearly so) and faster. Presumeably since Linux is virus-
    free I would not need antivirus (AV) software. Is this true?
    Eliminating AV software would free up RAM. Again, this system is not
    for a power user. I myself am a power user, would never think of
    switching to Linux. But for this lightweight user, perhaps Linux
    might work for them.

    Any ideas welcome. Be advised that I also needle the posters at
    comp.os.linux.advocacy, but this is not a flame. I really have not
    been able to get a straight answer on this issue.

    Some common mistakes made by respondants: they recommend their
    favorite distro without checking the min system requirements; they
    recommend something they've never tried (Puppy Linux, Ubuntu, and Damn
    Small Linux seem to be a favorites--but I need somebody who is very
    familiar with a distro before I install it and find out it won't work
    on this archaic system); and they assume that I have fast internet
    access on this machine. Also, some spiteful types from
    comp.os.linux.advocacy (avoid this group like the plague unless you
    simply enjoy flaming for its own sake) recommend distros that, when I
    research them, find they won't work on this machine specified above,
    so, please cite your choice with a link if possible.

    Thanks for your attention.

    RL

  2. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    raylopez99 wrote:

    > I have an old machine, not my main machine, nearly in mothballs that
    > somebody uses on occasion to surf the net and print a letter on a
    > recent model HP inkjet using OpenOffice as the word processor
    > program. *The machine is running on Windows 2000. The machine is an
    > Intel Pentium II, about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or maybe
    > it's 225, I upgraded it but forgot what it was, but I'm pretty sure
    > it's 512 MB). *The C: hard drive is only 2 GB large--the only one for
    > the OS. *This was a popular configuration in the mid to late 90s so
    > I'm sure a lot of these machines exist in the world, so somebody must
    > have loaded Linux on one of them.
    >
    > The machine has no DVD, only a CD reader. *It has a late 90s but
    > popular video card, forget the brand.
    >
    > What Linux distro to use for this configuration? *I can, using another
    > PC, download a distro, but then I would have to burn it onto a CD or
    > CDs, so I would rather not do that--that is, I would rather get or buy
    > a Linux distro that is already burnt, in proper order, onto labeled
    > CDs to make installation easier.


    Last time this question was asked I pointed to Vector Linux. I have used
    Vector Linux -- not on a machine as old as yours, but one close to it.
    Vector Linux Standard defaults to the Xface desktop -- a nicely implemented
    version of it -- so it is not weighted down by KDE or Gnome. You can buy a
    CD if you want for $25-27.

    I don't use Anti-Virus or Anti-Malware software on my Linux computer. I
    originally installed AVG but, since it found nothing, I uninstalled it
    considering it a waste of time and space.

    Vector Linux's website below:

    http://www.vectorlinux.com/

    The Standard 5.9 edition requires 128 Meg of RAM and... ah... 2.6 Gigs.

    So I guess you would have to go with the Light Edition, which requires 64
    Meg of RAM and a 2 Gig hard drive.

    (Hell, send me an email and I'll dig up a "huge" 6 Gig hard drive and send
    it.)

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  3. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    * raylopez99:
    > I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost
    > a year of trying.


    Maybe then this time you should take the time and at least check what
    you really have? "...about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or
    maybe it's 225.." and "...It has a late 90s but
    popular video card, forget the brand...." is worth nothing. There is no
    PentiumII 200MHz, so either it is a Pentium 200 or a PentiumII with
    higher clock speed. If it's a Pentium then you won't have much fun
    running Linux on it, too (except maybe for use as a router or file
    server). Same about memory (exact size and type), the mainboard and also
    the gfx card. You also want to check the gfx card because it won't give
    you much fun if it's not supported by Linux.

    If you expect people to help you the least thing you can do is to
    provide accurate details.

    Benjamin

  4. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    In comp.os.linux.misc raylopez99 wrote:
    > I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost
    > a year of trying.


    Here we go....
    over a dozen posts all with valid straight answers...

    Warning to non-COLA members...
    Lopez is a waste of space. An utter waste of skin.
    He's always pulling this trick, asking for help on a simple install and then
    utterly ignoring anyone who offers advice and complaining that no-one helped
    or no-one would give him a straight answer.

    He does it every few months.
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | "The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't |
    | in | suck is probably the day they start making |
    | Computer science | vacuum cleaners" - Ernst Jan Plugge |

  5. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    In comp.os.linux.misc Benjamin Gawert wrote:
    > If you expect people to help you the least thing you can do is to
    > provide accurate details.


    Yeah, like THAT'LL ever happen...
    I think he makes the specs up as he goes along, sometimes.
    (to be fair to linux though, I doubt there's a video card THAT old that'll
    cause problems)
    --
    | spike1@freenet.co,uk | "Are you pondering what I'm pondering Pinky?" |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | |
    | in | "I think so brain, but this time, you control |
    | Computer Science | the Encounter suit, and I'll do the voice..." |

  6. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    Benjamin Gawert wrote:
    > There is no PentiumII 200MHz, so either it is a Pentium 200 or a PentiumII
    > with > higher clock speed.


    It runs Microsoft Windows 2000, so it must be a Pentium II

    > If it's a Pentium then you won't have much fun
    > running Linux on it


    I use Pentium 120s here, and they work fine. It depends really on what
    you use them for, I suppose.

    > You also want to check the gfx card because it won't give
    > you much fun if it's not supported by Linux.


    Yeah, this is important. You will not be able to use "Windows
    Acceleration" without a supported card, and you will be limited to using
    800x600 SVGA mode. However many popular cards are supported, but you
    could really do with finding out what type of card is installed.

    If it runs Microsoft Windows 2000, you may be able to look at the system
    properties to find this.

    I use Debian on my computers, but I have upgraded all of my hard drives
    to at least 20Gb in size. (Many modern IDE drives have a capacity
    limiter jumper, restricting their capacity to 32Gb, making them useable
    in older machines.)

    If you want to stick with a small 2Gb drive, I would suggest Puppy
    Linux.

    Regards,

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  7. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    On Sat, 28 Jun 2008 06:31:17 -0400, Mark Hobley wrote:

    > Benjamin Gawert wrote:
    >> There is no PentiumII 200MHz, so either it is a Pentium 200 or a
    >> PentiumII with > higher clock speed.

    >
    > It runs Microsoft Windows 2000, so it must be a Pentium II
    >

    Do not waste your time speculating. Belarcs advisor runs on any WIndows
    platform down to Win98. Simply ask him to save the4 output and post it.

  8. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    On Sat, 28 Jun 2008 01:24:31 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    > I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost a
    > year of trying.
    >
    > Maybe three's the charm?
    >
    > Here goes again...
    >
    > I have an old machine, not my main machine, nearly in mothballs that
    > somebody uses on occasion to surf the net and print a letter on a recent
    > model HP inkjet using OpenOffice as the word processor program. The
    > machine is running on Windows 2000. The machine is an Intel Pentium II,
    > about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or maybe it's 225, I
    > upgraded it but forgot what it was, but I'm pretty sure it's 512 MB).
    > The C: hard drive is only 2 GB large--the only one for the OS. This was
    > a popular configuration in the mid to late 90s so I'm sure a lot of
    > these machines exist in the world, so somebody must have loaded Linux on
    > one of them.
    >
    > The machine has no DVD, only a CD reader. It has a late 90s but popular
    > video card, forget the brand.
    >
    > What Linux distro to use for this configuration? I can, using another
    > PC, download a distro, but then I would have to burn it onto a CD or
    > CDs, so I would rather not do that--that is, I would rather get or buy a
    > Linux distro that is already burnt, in proper order, onto labeled CDs to
    > make installation easier.
    >
    > In case you're wondering why I want to switch to Linux: though the NT
    > system is functional, it's slow, and rumor has it that Linux is 'virus
    > free' (or nearly so) and faster. Presumeably since Linux is virus- free
    > I would not need antivirus (AV) software. Is this true? Eliminating AV
    > software would free up RAM. Again, this system is not for a power user.
    > I myself am a power user, would never think of switching to Linux. But
    > for this lightweight user, perhaps Linux might work for them.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome. Be advised that I also needle the posters at
    > comp.os.linux.advocacy, but this is not a flame. I really have not been
    > able to get a straight answer on this issue.
    >
    > Some common mistakes made by respondants: they recommend their favorite
    > distro without checking the min system requirements; they recommend
    > something they've never tried (Puppy Linux, Ubuntu, and Damn Small Linux
    > seem to be a favorites--but I need somebody who is very familiar with a
    > distro before I install it and find out it won't work on this archaic
    > system); and they assume that I have fast internet access on this
    > machine. Also, some spiteful types from comp.os.linux.advocacy (avoid
    > this group like the plague unless you simply enjoy flaming for its own
    > sake) recommend distros that, when I research them, find they won't work
    > on this machine specified above, so, please cite your choice with a link
    > if possible.
    >
    > Thanks for your attention.
    >
    > RL


    I would probably try Elive first - I installed it on a P166 with 64mb RAM
    last year and it was 'decent'. Other options would include Damn Small and
    Vector.

  9. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    Andrew Halliwell wrote:

    > In comp.os.linux.misc Benjamin Gawert wrote:
    >> If you expect people to help you the least thing you can do is to
    >> provide accurate details.

    >
    > Yeah, like THAT'LL ever happen...
    > I think he makes the specs up as he goes along, sometimes.
    > (to be fair to linux though, I doubt there's a video card THAT old that'll
    > cause problems)


    One example that springs to mind as a tricky card that old is the ISA and
    VLBUS range of Cirrus Logic cards, had to try several settings before
    getting it working without display corruption last time I tried to use one
    of these cards - but then that was about 9 years ago on Mandrake 7.0 so
    maybe even these work now.

    Quite why he insists on finding a distro for a machine of unknown spec this
    old is still a real mystery when newer and faster hardware is being thrown
    away (I know of companies near me who are now trashing 2ghz P4's as
    obsolete - unfortunately their company policies demand they get sent to
    outside recycling companies due to current EU disposal laws).

    Lets face it even if someone on here offered him a free PIII machine with
    Linux pre-installed he'd still insist that this was not good enough and we
    have to supply a source for a distro available retail that supports his
    unknown spec machine.

  10. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    On Jun 28, 2:26*am, Benjamin Gawert wrote:

    > Maybe then this time you should take the time and at least check what
    > you really have? "...about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or
    > maybe it's 225.." and "...It has a late 90s but
    > popular video card, forget the brand...." is worth nothing. There is no
    > PentiumII 200MHz, so either it is a Pentium 200 or a PentiumII with
    > higher clock speed. If it's a Pentium then you won't have much fun
    > running Linux on it, too (except maybe for use as a router or file
    > server). Same about memory (exact size and type), the mainboard and also
    > the gfx card.


    So your argument then is for maintaining the status quo--running
    Windows 2000. Thanks for your vote.

    Anybody else?

    RL

  11. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    On Jun 28, 3:31*am, markhob...@hotpop.donottypethisbit.com (Mark
    Hobley) wrote:

    > If you want to stick with a small 2Gb drive, I would suggest Puppy
    > Linux.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Mark.


    Thank you Mark for the Puppy Linux vote, though I take it you're
    relying on hearsay and have never tried it. What word processor and
    what web browser do you recommend for such a weak system?

    RL

  12. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    On Jun 28, 4:32*am, BubbaT wrote:

    >
    > Do not waste your time speculating. Belarcs advisor runs on any WIndows
    > platform down to Win98. Simply ask him to save the4 output and post it.


    No shiite head Bubba--the system is not mine, it's loaned to a friend,
    far away in fact. Any other "brilliant" ideas, Einstein?

    RL

  13. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    * Andrew Halliwell:

    > I think he makes the specs up as he goes along, sometimes.
    > (to be fair to linux though, I doubt there's a video card THAT old that'll
    > cause problems)


    What about the Nvidia Riva128(ZX) or the bigger cards from 3DLabs
    (Wildcat series)?

    Benjamin

  14. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    * raylopez99:

    > So your argument then is for maintaining the status quo--running
    > Windows 2000.


    No, my argument is that you should finally get your act together and
    check what exactly you have.

    Benjamin

  15. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    * Mark Hobley:

    > It runs Microsoft Windows 2000, so it must be a Pentium II


    Why? Windows 2000 runs out of the box on a Pentium 133 with 64MB.

    Benjamin

  16. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits onCDs?

    raylopez99 wrote:
    > I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost
    > a year of trying.
    >
    > Maybe three's the charm?
    >
    > Here goes again...
    >
    > I have an old machine, not my main machine, nearly in mothballs that
    > somebody uses on occasion to surf the net and print a letter on a
    > recent model HP inkjet using OpenOffice as the word processor
    > program. The machine is running on Windows 2000. The machine is an
    > Intel Pentium II, about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or maybe
    > it's 225, I upgraded it but forgot what it was, but I'm pretty sure
    > it's 512 MB). The C: hard drive is only 2 GB large--the only one for
    > the OS. This was a popular configuration in the mid to late 90s so
    > I'm sure a lot of these machines exist in the world, so somebody must
    > have loaded Linux on one of them.
    >
    > The machine has no DVD, only a CD reader. It has a late 90s but
    > popular video card, forget the brand.
    >
    > What Linux distro to use for this configuration? I can, using another
    > PC, download a distro, but then I would have to burn it onto a CD or
    > CDs, so I would rather not do that--that is, I would rather get or buy
    > a Linux distro that is already burnt, in proper order, onto labeled
    > CDs to make installation easier.
    >
    > In case you're wondering why I want to switch to Linux: though the NT
    > system is functional, it's slow, and rumor has it that Linux is 'virus
    > free' (or nearly so) and faster. Presumeably since Linux is virus-
    > free I would not need antivirus (AV) software. Is this true?
    > Eliminating AV software would free up RAM. Again, this system is not
    > for a power user. I myself am a power user, would never think of
    > switching to Linux. But for this lightweight user, perhaps Linux
    > might work for them.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome. Be advised that I also needle the posters at
    > comp.os.linux.advocacy, but this is not a flame. I really have not
    > been able to get a straight answer on this issue.
    >
    > Some common mistakes made by respondants: they recommend their
    > favorite distro without checking the min system requirements; they
    > recommend something they've never tried (Puppy Linux, Ubuntu, and Damn
    > Small Linux seem to be a favorites--but I need somebody who is very
    > familiar with a distro before I install it and find out it won't work
    > on this archaic system); and they assume that I have fast internet
    > access on this machine. Also, some spiteful types from
    > comp.os.linux.advocacy (avoid this group like the plague unless you
    > simply enjoy flaming for its own sake) recommend distros that, when I
    > research them, find they won't work on this machine specified above,
    > so, please cite your choice with a link if possible.
    >
    > Thanks for your attention.
    >
    > RL


    http://dynebolic.org/

    "dyne:bolic is shaped on the needs of media activists, artists and
    creatives as a practical tool for multimedia production: you can
    manipulate and broadcast both sound and video with tools to record,
    edit, encode and stream, having automatically recognized most device and
    peripherals: audio, video, TV, network cards, firewire, usb and more;
    all using only free software!"

    "You can employ this operating system without the need to install
    anything, and if you want to run it from harddisk you just need to copy
    a directory: the easiest installation ever seen!"

    "It is optimized to run on slower computers, turning them into full
    media stations: the minimum you need is a pentium1 or k5 PC 64Mb RAM and
    IDE CD-ROM, or a modded XBOX game console - and if you have more than
    one, you can easily do clusters."

  17. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, raylopez99

    wrote
    on Sat, 28 Jun 2008 01:24:31 -0700 (PDT)
    :
    > I have not been able to get a straight answer to this, despite almost
    > a year of trying.
    >
    > Maybe three's the charm?
    >
    > Here goes again...
    >
    > I have an old machine, not my main machine, nearly in mothballs that
    > somebody uses on occasion to surf the net and print a letter on a
    > recent model HP inkjet using OpenOffice as the word processor
    > program. The machine is running on Windows 2000. The machine is an
    > Intel Pentium II, about 200 MHz clock, with about 500 MB RAM (or maybe
    > it's 225, I upgraded it but forgot what it was, but I'm pretty sure
    > it's 512 MB). The C: hard drive is only 2 GB large--the only one for
    > the OS. This was a popular configuration in the mid to late 90s so
    > I'm sure a lot of these machines exist in the world, so somebody must
    > have loaded Linux on one of them.
    >
    > The machine has no DVD, only a CD reader. It has a late 90s but
    > popular video card, forget the brand.
    >
    > What Linux distro to use for this configuration?


    Before you ask *what*, you must first ask *why*. Win2k
    appears to be satisfactorially running on that machine;
    there's no particular reason to change absent additional
    information.

    Did you have a repurposing of this machine in mind?

    (Me, I got sick of Windows 95, long ago, and I'm an old
    Unix head. That's satisfactory ... barely ... as an explanation.)

    If you're going to go ahead with this, make it a dual-boot.
    At least that way, you'll have a fallback.

    > I can, using another
    > PC, download a distro, but then I would have to burn it onto a CD or
    > CDs, so I would rather not do that--that is, I would rather get or buy
    > a Linux distro that is already burnt, in proper order, onto labeled
    > CDs to make installation easier.


    http://www.cheapbytes.com/ is still around. In any event
    it makes little difference; the .ISO images are burnt
    as-is; no reassembly required.

    If you *really* want to build your very own distro, it's
    possible but arduous. (I'll admit to some curiosity
    on some of the technical stuff, though -- like setting
    up booting. However, for me it's not a high priority.)

    >
    > In case you're wondering why I want to switch to Linux:


    I do.

    > though the NT
    > system is functional, it's slow,


    Compared to a 3.2 GHz 2 GB RAM modern sort, *anything* on a 200 MHz
    Pentium II with 500 MB RAM isn't going to be speedy.

    > and rumor has it that Linux is 'virus
    > free' (or nearly so) and faster.


    That is only a rumor. BadBunnyz is out there, for example.
    True, Linux is very virus-*resistant*, and most distros
    are set up such that even if a virus does in fact infect
    a user's executables, turning a user's account into a
    quasi-zombie, the system (loosely defined, the bits owned
    by root or bin) is still reasonably safe. Of course BadBunnyz
    will infect all of a user's documents, given half a chance, but
    it can't infect another user's documents without that other user
    letting it in, nor can it infect the rest of the system.

    > Presumeably since Linux is virus-
    > free I would not need antivirus (AV) software. Is this true?


    Depends. For the most part, AV software is unnecessary for
    Linux *desktops*. However, if you're going to use that thing
    for a Linux *server*, you may want virus detection software
    to protect downstream Windows nodes. (This is a rather specialized
    solution, to be sure.)

    > Eliminating AV software would free up RAM.


    And disk space.

    > Again, this system is not
    > for a power user. I myself am a power user, would never think of
    > switching to Linux. But for this lightweight user, perhaps Linux
    > might work for them.


    Perhaps, perhaps not. I ask again: is there a reason to switch
    from Win2k? "Having a lightweight user" on the box is insufficient.
    Might be cheaper to buy a new box, especially since most consultants
    charge over $100k/hour. Also, they can learn Windows Vista, which
    is supposed to be easy to use, intuitive, and what not.

    >
    > Any ideas welcome. Be advised that I also needle the posters at
    > comp.os.linux.advocacy, but this is not a flame. I really have not
    > been able to get a straight answer on this issue.
    >


    Well, you need to clarify your question. At best, you're trying
    to install a 2008-era distro on 1998-era hardware. There's some
    issues there. At worst, you're working with an about-to-be-doorstop.

    > Some common mistakes made by respondants: they recommend their
    > favorite distro without checking the min system requirements; they
    > recommend something they've never tried (Puppy Linux, Ubuntu, and Damn
    > Small Linux seem to be a favorites--but I need somebody who is very
    > familiar with a distro before I install it and find out it won't work
    > on this archaic system); and they assume that I have fast internet
    > access on this machine. Also, some spiteful types from
    > comp.os.linux.advocacy (avoid this group like the plague unless you
    > simply enjoy flaming for its own sake) recommend distros that, when I
    > research them, find they won't work on this machine specified above,
    > so, please cite your choice with a link if possible.


    You will have to go into more detail as to what you expect
    the user of that machine to do:

    - Browsing?
    - Email?
    - Flash Gameplay (e.g., ArmorGames, Miniclip)?
    - Native Gameplay (e.g., Halo, UT, Quake)?
    - Spreadsheets?
    - Documentation?
    - Software development?
    * C/C++?
    * .NET?
    * Java?
    * Other?

    Specifics are important, especially for games, which tend
    to favor Windows (Halo in particular is Windows-only, AIUI),
    if only because developers tend to go towards the big targets.

    You can try http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/ if you just want to
    experiment; it's one of the lighter-weight distros, occupying
    only 50MB of disk space.

    >
    > Thanks for your attention.
    >
    > RL


    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. Because it's time to refresh your hardware. Trust us.
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  18. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Benjamin Gawert

    wrote
    on Sun, 29 Jun 2008 16:55:54 +0100
    <6cppkmF3h13raU2@mid.individual.net>:
    > * raylopez99:
    >
    >> So your argument then is for maintaining the status quo--running
    >> Windows 2000.

    >
    > No, my argument is that you should finally get your act together and
    > check what exactly you have.
    >
    > Benjamin


    What he has is a machine satisfactorially running Win2k.
    It is very strange that he wants to load Linux on it.

    Did I miss something in the original problem specification?

    Granted, Windows does appear to be getting bigger,
    especially if one upgrades to Vista. Since that's not
    in the gameplan, though, color me puzzled.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. It'll Fix Everything(tm).
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  19. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    raylopez99 wrote:
    >
    > Thank you Mark for the Puppy Linux vote, though I take it you're
    > relying on hearsay and have never tried it. What word processor and
    > what web browser do you recommend for such a weak system?


    I have used Puppy Linux, and it works fine. It comes with Mozilla
    Seamonkey and Abiword.

    Regards,

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  20. Re: What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

    Benjamin Gawert wrote:

    > Why? Windows 2000 runs out of the box on a Pentium 133 with 64MB.


    Hmmm, I'm sure Microsoft have changed their minds, since I last looked at this,
    but you appear to be right. That is what their website now says.

    I used to run a 450Mhz Pentium with 128Mb RAM and Microsoft Windows '95.
    My machine was way above specification, but the system ran like a pile
    of ****. I'm glad the days of Microsoft Windows are over.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

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