Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary..... - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary..... - Linux ; [jim] > Most FOSS projects die within 5 years just because people have to feed their > families. Just look at the FOSS Graveyard (aka sourceforge.net) and that's > all the proof you need of the unsustainability of most FOSS ...

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Thread: Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary.....

  1. Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary.....

    [jim]
    > Most FOSS projects die within 5 years just because people have to feed their
    > families. Just look at the FOSS Graveyard (aka sourceforge.net) and that's
    > all the proof you need of the unsustainability of most FOSS projects.


    Quite many commercial software projects are canned as well. I've
    heard failure rates of 90%. Anyway, does the failure rate matter? I
    think the quality and quantity of the successful projects matters more.

    --
    Tobias Brox, 6942'N, 1857'E

  2. Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary.....

    On 2008-06-13, Tobias Brox wrote:
    > [jim]
    >> Most FOSS projects die within 5 years just because people have to feed their
    >> families. Just look at the FOSS Graveyard (aka sourceforge.net) and that's
    >> all the proof you need of the unsustainability of most FOSS projects.

    >
    > Quite many commercial software projects are canned as well. I've
    > heard failure rates of 90%. Anyway, does the failure rate matter? I
    > think the quality and quantity of the successful projects matters more.


    True. I think it is more relevant to see how often peope are hooked into
    a system that dies. I've been running public software for many many
    years and I can't recall much. I liked qps (Qt process monitor) a lot
    and I think is was better than most things I see around now, but that
    won't be mission critical. My scanner (Epson) died when moving to the
    libusb stuff. That is annoying, but not much different from the
    situation around major Windows upgrades. Other than that, I can't recall
    I ever had to discontinue using something because the developer stopped.

    The figures indeed say little. Many so called open source projects are
    just personal or student projects. They are easy enough to avoid if you
    want. Would be interesting to see how often big Linux distributions drop
    packages due to stopped maintenance/development.

    Finally, in the OS community there is a lot more attention to open
    format standards, so even if the package goes down it isn't a nightmare.

    --- Jan

  3. Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary.....

    Jan Wielemaker wrote:

    > My scanner (Epson) died when moving to the
    > libusb stuff. That is annoying, but not much different from the
    > situation around major Windows upgrades. Other than that, I can't recall
    > I ever had to discontinue using something because the developer stopped.


    I did for a long time patch my kernel source to use the old module for
    my scanner, not for my scanner didn't work with libusb, but for it was a
    lot easier with setting up privileges when it came to the module.

    I didn't have to make any changes in the driver code itself, just add
    the files and see to that the option appeared in the menuconfig.

    --

    //Aho

  4. Re: Just my experience with FOSS - your mileage may vary.....

    On 2008-06-14, J.O. Aho wrote:
    > Jan Wielemaker wrote:
    >
    >> My scanner (Epson) died when moving to the
    >> libusb stuff. That is annoying, but not much different from the
    >> situation around major Windows upgrades. Other than that, I can't recall
    >> I ever had to discontinue using something because the developer stopped.

    >
    > I did for a long time patch my kernel source to use the old module for
    > my scanner, not for my scanner didn't work with libusb, but for it was a
    > lot easier with setting up privileges when it came to the module.
    >
    > I didn't have to make any changes in the driver code itself, just add
    > the files and see to that the option appeared in the menuconfig.


    Thats a nice example where an educated user or a little OS business
    around the corner can keep his/her things alive. I have the experience,
    but I don't want to step outside standard build kernels as I don't want
    to spent the time dealing with upgrades and in small business context,
    buying a new scanner is a far more efficient option.

    Cheers --- Jan

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