Innovation(tm) in Windows 7 - Linux

This is a discussion on Innovation(tm) in Windows 7 - Linux ; Windows 7 is described by observers from the [Wall Street Journal] as having a touch interface recognizable to "anyone who’s ever used an iPhone." [Apple has many patents on touch technology...] Microsoft may also have to explain a more conventional ...

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  1. Innovation(tm) in Windows 7


    Windows 7 is described by observers from the [Wall Street Journal] as
    having a touch interface recognizable to "anyone who’s ever used an
    iPhone."

    [Apple has many patents on touch technology...]

    Microsoft may also have to explain a more conventional similarity in
    Windows 7 when it arrives as soon as late 2009. The still very young
    operating system features a revamped, more colorful taskbar and the
    conspicuous addition of a Mac OS X-like dock for quickly managing
    apps.


    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...esktop_os.html

  2. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    ____/ nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu on Thursday 05 June 2008 00:01 : \____

    >
    > Windows 7 is described by observers from the [Wall Street Journal] as
    > having a touch interface recognizable to "anyone who’s ever used an
    > iPhone."
    >
    > [Apple has many patents on touch technology...]


    Microsoft had nothing to show, so it put up on display some touchscreen
    technology from the 1980s (Xerox). Oh wait. It was /multi/ touch... now
    that's 'innovation'... Myrvold and Chaps(C) need many dinners to come up with
    the idea of having two inputs from XY coordinates. This also assumed that
    everyone will buy touchscreens. Didn't Windows have touchscreen support over
    10 years ago?

    > Microsoft may also have to explain a more conventional similarity in
    > Windows 7 when it arrives as soon as late 2009. The still very young
    > operating system features a revamped, more colorful taskbar and the
    > conspicuous addition of a Mac OS X-like dock for quickly managing

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Mac OS X just copied the idea from a variety of other desktop environments.
    Even the shadow casting.


    > apps.
    >
    >
    >

    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...esktop_os.html

    - --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Linux: stop maintenance; get more actual work done
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    06:20:02 up 51 days, 4:32, 5 users, load average: 0.36, 1.83, 2.07
    http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project
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    wleSpUy1TYzrGy4rNpKGUI8=
    =3itg
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  3. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    schreef in bericht
    news:1e798392-bfce-42f7-95ed-08513e67f8a9@q24g2000prf.googlegroups.com...

    Windows 7 ..............

    Your post is off-topic in this group, your violating
    [comp.os.linux.advocacy] FAQ and Primer for COLA, Edition III
    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/

    * The trespasser has come to COLA in order to vent his dislike of
    Microsoft and/or Windows. For that purpose several newsgroups have
    been created.
    * alt.crimehip.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.emircpih.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.flame.ms-windows
    * alt.h.i.p.c.r.i.m.e.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.h0pcr0me.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.h1pcr1me.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.h2pcr2me.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.hh.ii.pp.cc.rr.ii.mm.ee.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.hipclone.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.hipcrime.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.microsoft.crash.crash.crash
    * alt.microsoft.sucks
    * alt.os.windows95.crash.crash.crash
    * comp.misc.microsoft.sucks
    * microsoft.sucks.
    * sk.sux.microsoft
    Fsck you arsehole troll
    *PLONK*



  4. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7


    "Roy Schestowitz" wrote in message
    news:1706592.dSvh9vVtRa@schestowitz.com...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >
    > Mac OS X just copied the idea from a variety of other desktop
    > environments.
    > Even the shadow casting.
    >


    Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or stolen.

    I didn't think so.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel

    wrote
    on Thu, 5 Jun 2008 14:02:24 -0400
    <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >
    > "Roy Schestowitz" wrote in message
    > news:1706592.dSvh9vVtRa@schestowitz.com...
    >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >>
    >> Mac OS X just copied the idea from a variety of other desktop
    >> environments.
    >> Even the shadow casting.
    >>

    >
    > Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or stolen.
    >
    > I didn't think so.
    >


    OK, since Linux is constructed from theft, who stole,
    whom was it stolen from, who should sue whom, and for
    what remedies?

    (You are welcome to include Xerox Parc, of course, though
    I suspect the primary plaintiff will be Microsoft, were
    they serious enough to pursue this.)

    >
    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **



    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C/C++ Programming Idea #104392:
    for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) sleep(0);
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    > 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:


    >> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >> stolen.


    Show me something in /any/ modern OS that isn't copied from something
    older. As for /theft/ ... that's /Microsoft's/ forté, not Linux's.

    Synet had already trademarked Internet Explorer as a brand name when
    Microsoft came calling, offering 75 thousand dollars for rights to the
    name. When they refused Microsoft stole the name anyway, and Synet went
    bankrupt fighting the software goliath’s lawyers in court. After filing
    for bankruptcy the company was forced to settle for a paltry five
    million dollars.
    http://thepopulist.wordpress.com/2003/10/


    The origins of Microsoft's "innovation":

    http://www.vanwensveen.nl/rants/micr...IhateMS_1.html

    > OK, since Linux is constructed from theft, who stole, whom was it
    > stolen from, who should sue whom, and for what remedies?


    Linux (the kernel) was written from scratch, and conceptually founded in
    MINIX. The creator of MINIX, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, has vehemently denied
    that Linus copied code from MINIX:

    Linus has been accused of stealing Linux from MINIX. Is that true?
    No. Absolutely not. Ken Brown of the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
    wrote a report, funded in part by Microsoft, claiming that Linus stole
    Linux from MINIX. Brown's conclusion was that companies should not use
    Linux because the ownership of the intellectual property rights is
    unclear. This is complete garbage. While it is most unlikely that a
    21-year-old student would have been capable of writing his own operating
    system had he not had the complete source code for a similar operating
    system available to use, study and modify, Linus wrote the initial
    version of the Linux code himself.
    http://www.minix3.org/doc/faq.html#legal

    As for Free Software in general, I can't comment on each and every one
    of the hundreds of thousands of Free Software projects, but if there was
    some kind of mass plagiarism going on then I think someone would have
    noticed by now (other than lying MS shills, that is).

    > (You are welcome to include Xerox Parc, of course, though I suspect
    > the primary plaintiff will be Microsoft, were they serious enough to
    > pursue this.)


    Actually that was Apple, not Microsoft, and Apple did not /steal/
    anything from Xerox. According to Jeffrey S. Young, in his book "Steve
    Jobs, the Journey Is the Reward", Jobs actually set up a visit to PARC,
    and made the following deal with Xerox: You let us in and look around,
    and we'll let you invest in us in case we come up with something
    commercially successful. [1]

    Apple licensed limited features of the LISA GUI to Microsoft for Windows
    1.0. When the Vole then copied /more/ LISA features and added them to
    Windows 2.0, Apple cried foul, and litigated. Microsoft continued
    copying even /more/ LISA features into Windows 3.0, by which time the
    court case had started, but unfortunately the Judge ruled that much of
    the alleged plagiarism was covered in the original license, and the
    remaining elements were dismissed as trivial/unoriginal. Apple disputed
    this, of course.

    The one and only original product created by Microsoft was a BASIC
    interpreter. From that moment to this, they have done nothing but copy
    (and in some documented cases steal [2]) ideas; software; trademarks;
    trade secrets; and other "IP" from others. For a company that defends
    the principles of "IP" so passionately, this is gross hypocrisy.

    As detailed on Frank van Wensveen's Website:

    While the BASIC programming language itself was already in the public
    domain by then, there was no interpreter that could run it on the first
    microcomputers, and the small microprocessor systems typically developed
    by hobbyists and researchers were still being programmed in machine code
    and often operated via switches.

    Thus Gates and Allen could be said to have created an original product.
    One might even call it a true innovation.

    It would be one of their last.

    [1]
    [2]

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | 'When it comes to knowledge, "ownership" just doesn't make sense'
    | ~ Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. http://tinyurl.com/22bgx8
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.23.8-63.fc8
    23:45:51 up 168 days, 20:21, 5 users, load average: 0.10, 0.42, 0.35

  7. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Homer wrote:
    > Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    >> 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:

    >
    >>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>> stolen.


    The source code for the kernel.

    --
    Ron House
    rhouse@smartchat.net.au

  8. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Ron House wrote:
    > Homer wrote:
    >> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun
    >>> 2008 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:

    >>
    >>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>> stolen.

    >
    > The source code for the kernel.



    "Yes, it does appear that in this case code was copied into Linux from older
    Unix versions."

    http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/smoking-fizzle.html




  9. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    * Ron House peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > Homer wrote:
    >> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    >>> 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:

    >>
    >>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>> stolen.

    >
    > The source code for the kernel.


    Notice how ol' Zeke sticks in a weasel word to cover his ass: "copied".

    Thus, you can't raise a large number of examples of code that has no
    equivalent in Windows, such as X-Windows, all the window managers,
    compilers, the whole set of GNU software.

    Zeke doesn't have the courage of his convictions.

    --
    Reinvent yourself!
    -- Bill Gates

  10. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    On 2008-06-07, Linonut wrote:
    > * Ron House peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> Homer wrote:
    >>> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    >>>> 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >>>
    >>>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>>> stolen.

    >>
    >> The source code for the kernel.

    >
    > Notice how ol' Zeke sticks in a weasel word to cover his ass: "copied".
    >
    > Thus, you can't raise a large number of examples of code that has no
    > equivalent in Windows, such as X-Windows, all the window managers,
    > compilers, the whole set of GNU software.
    >
    > Zeke doesn't have the courage of his convictions.


    Did you catch his mini-morph recently?

    He suddenly escaped from my bozo bin... a subtle transposition in his
    fake email reply address. When did it become OK to put a fake reply
    address?

    --
    Regards,

    Gregory.
    Gentoo Linux - Penguin Power

  11. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    DFS wrote:
    > Ron House wrote:
    >> Homer wrote:
    >>> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun
    >>>> 2008 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >>>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>>> stolen.

    >> The source code for the kernel.

    >
    >
    > "Yes, it does appear that in this case code was copied into Linux from older
    > Unix versions."
    >
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/smoking-fizzle.html


    See Ron run! Run Ron Run!


  12. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    DFS writes:

    > DFS wrote:
    >> Ron House wrote:
    >>> Homer wrote:
    >>>> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>>>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun
    >>>>> 2008 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >>>>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>>>> stolen.
    >>> The source code for the kernel.

    >>
    >>
    >> "Yes, it does appear that in this case code was copied into Linux
    >> from older Unix versions."
    >>
    >> http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/smoking-fizzle.html

    >
    > See Ron run! Run Ron Run!
    >


    "Ron House" is such a transparent nym for a typical COLA "advocate" it's
    just not funny any more.

    --
    Are we going to make an emacs out of apt?
    APT - Debian in a program. It even does your laundry
    -- Seen on #Debian

  13. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    On Sun, 08 Jun 2008 20:30:56 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > DFS writes:
    >
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>> Ron House wrote:
    >>>> Homer wrote:
    >>>>> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>>>>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun
    >>>>>> 2008 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >>>>>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>>>>> stolen.
    >>>> The source code for the kernel.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Yes, it does appear that in this case code was copied into Linux
    >>> from older Unix versions."
    >>>
    >>> http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/smoking-fizzle.html

    >>
    >> See Ron run! Run Ron Run!
    >>

    >
    > "Ron House" is such a transparent nym for a typical COLA "advocate" it's
    > just not funny any more.


    It's HPT.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  14. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Homer

    wrote
    on Fri, 06 Jun 2008 23:46:11 +0100
    :
    > Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    >> 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:

    >
    >>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>> stolen.

    >
    > Show me something in /any/ modern OS that isn't copied from something
    > older. As for /theft/ ... that's /Microsoft's/ forté, not Linux's.
    >
    >
    > Synet had already trademarked Internet Explorer as a brand name when
    > Microsoft came calling, offering 75 thousand dollars for rights to the
    > name. When they refused Microsoft stole the name anyway, and Synet went
    > bankrupt fighting the software goliath?s lawyers in court. After filing
    > for bankruptcy the company was forced to settle for a paltry five
    > million dollars.
    >
    >
    > http://thepopulist.wordpress.com/2003/10/
    >
    >
    > The origins of Microsoft's "innovation":
    >
    > http://www.vanwensveen.nl/rants/micr...IhateMS_1.html
    >
    >> OK, since Linux is constructed from theft, who stole, whom was it
    >> stolen from, who should sue whom, and for what remedies?

    >
    > Linux (the kernel) was written from scratch, and conceptually founded in
    > MINIX. The creator of MINIX, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, has vehemently denied
    > that Linus copied code from MINIX:


    I'll admit to some curiosity as to what Minix code circa
    1990 looked like, myself...but you are entirely correct
    AFAIK.

    >
    >
    > Linus has been accused of stealing Linux from MINIX. Is that true?
    > No. Absolutely not. Ken Brown of the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
    > wrote a report, funded in part by Microsoft, claiming that Linus stole
    > Linux from MINIX. Brown's conclusion was that companies should not use
    > Linux because the ownership of the intellectual property rights is
    > unclear. This is complete garbage. While it is most unlikely that a
    > 21-year-old student would have been capable of writing his own operating
    > system had he not had the complete source code for a similar operating
    > system available to use, study and modify, Linus wrote the initial
    > version of the Linux code himself.
    >
    >
    > http://www.minix3.org/doc/faq.html#legal
    >
    > As for Free Software in general, I can't comment on each and every one
    > of the hundreds of thousands of Free Software projects, but if there was
    > some kind of mass plagiarism going on then I think someone would have
    > noticed by now (other than lying MS shills, that is).


    I suspect there's a bit of something going on that looks
    like idea-stealing (as opposed to implementation-stealing),
    but I also just ran into a Flash game that looks an awful
    lot like another Flash game (both have to do with killing
    zombies on an isometric view field; the main difference is
    that one uses barriers, the other speaker stacks to block
    the zombies -- but they do look a little too similar).

    Wish I could remember the names of both, but I'll look them up
    later.

    As it is, there's only so many ways to write a for loop. :-)

    >
    >> (You are welcome to include Xerox Parc, of course, though I suspect
    >> the primary plaintiff will be Microsoft, were they serious enough to
    >> pursue this.)

    >
    > Actually that was Apple, not Microsoft, and Apple did not /steal/
    > anything from Xerox. According to Jeffrey S. Young, in his book "Steve
    > Jobs, the Journey Is the Reward", Jobs actually set up a visit to PARC,
    > and made the following deal with Xerox: You let us in and look around,
    > and we'll let you invest in us in case we come up with something
    > commercially successful. [1]
    >
    > Apple licensed limited features of the LISA GUI to Microsoft for Windows
    > 1.0. When the Vole then copied /more/ LISA features and added them to
    > Windows 2.0, Apple cried foul, and litigated. Microsoft continued
    > copying even /more/ LISA features into Windows 3.0, by which time the
    > court case had started, but unfortunately the Judge ruled that much of
    > the alleged plagiarism was covered in the original license, and the
    > remaining elements were dismissed as trivial/unoriginal. Apple disputed
    > this, of course.
    >
    > The one and only original product created by Microsoft was a BASIC
    > interpreter.


    Heh. I thought he lifted it from a dumpster? I've worked with HP
    BASIC tapes (in high school); they're rather big. ;-)

    > From that moment to this, they have done nothing but copy
    > (and in some documented cases steal [2]) ideas; software; trademarks;
    > trade secrets; and other "IP" from others. For a company that defends
    > the principles of "IP" so passionately, this is gross hypocrisy.
    >
    > As detailed on Frank van Wensveen's Website:
    >
    >
    > While the BASIC programming language itself was already in the public
    > domain by then, there was no interpreter that could run it on the first
    > microcomputers, and the small microprocessor systems typically developed
    > by hobbyists and researchers were still being programmed in machine code
    > and often operated via switches.
    >
    > Thus Gates and Allen could be said to have created an original product.
    > One might even call it a true innovation.
    >
    > It would be one of their last.
    >
    >
    >
    > [1]
    > [2]
    >


    The seed of the entire structure? An interesting thought.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C/C++ Programming Idea #10239993:
    char * f(char *p) {char *q = malloc(strlen(p)); strcpy(q,p); return q; }
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  15. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Homer wrote on Fri, 06
    > Jun 2008 23:46:11 +0100 :


    >> The one and only original product created by Microsoft was a BASIC
    >> interpreter.

    >
    > Heh. I thought he lifted it from a dumpster?


    Not proven.

    Interviewer: Is studying computer science the best way to prepare to be
    a programmer?

    Gates: No, the best way to prepare is to write programs, and to study
    great programs that other people have written. In my case, I went to the
    garbage cans at the Computer Science Center and I fished out listings of
    their operating systems.
    P83 of Programmers at Work, by Susan Lammers (Microsoft Press: ISBN-13:
    978-0914845713).

    Although given what we know now of Gates' blatant disregard for others'
    "IP" (whilst hypocritically protecting his "own"), anything is possible.

    > I've worked with HP BASIC tapes (in high school); they're rather big.
    > ;-)


    The (physically) biggest storage medium I've personally seen with was
    open reel tapes, that had approx a 1ft diameter. They were being
    top-loaded in what looked like cake boxes into a horizontally oriented
    machine in the server room at Uni (off limits to students, but one could
    see the activity through the smoked-glass partitions). The faculty staff
    were not forthcoming about the details, but the rest of the system
    mostly comprised DEC workstations running Ultrix.

    >> Thus Gates and Allen could be said to have created an original
    >> product. One might even call it a true innovation.
    >>
    >> It would be one of their last. [/quote]

    [...]
    > The seed of the entire structure? An interesting thought.


    The seed of a rotten apple, certainly.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | 'When it comes to knowledge, "ownership" just doesn't make sense'
    | ~ Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. http://tinyurl.com/22bgx8
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.23.8-63.fc8
    23:27:30 up 171 days, 20:03, 1 user, load average: 0.01, 0.04, 0.06

  16. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Homer

    wrote
    on Mon, 09 Jun 2008 23:27:56 +0100
    :
    > Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Homer wrote on Fri, 06
    >> Jun 2008 23:46:11 +0100 :

    >
    >>> The one and only original product created by Microsoft was a BASIC
    >>> interpreter.

    >>
    >> Heh. I thought he lifted it from a dumpster?

    >
    > Not proven.
    >
    >
    > Interviewer: Is studying computer science the best way to prepare to be
    > a programmer?
    >
    > Gates: No, the best way to prepare is to write programs, and to study
    > great programs that other people have written. In my case, I went to the
    > garbage cans at the Computer Science Center and I fished out listings of
    > their operating systems.
    >
    >
    > P83 of Programmers at Work, by Susan Lammers (Microsoft Press: ISBN-13:
    > 978-0914845713).
    >
    > Although given what we know now of Gates' blatant disregard for others'
    > "IP" (whilst hypocritically protecting his "own"), anything is possible.


    Yeah, though binary punched paper tapes aren't the easiest things
    to read.

    >
    >> I've worked with HP BASIC tapes (in high school); they're rather big.
    >> ;-)

    >
    > The (physically) biggest storage medium I've personally seen with was
    > open reel tapes, that had approx a 1ft diameter. They were being
    > top-loaded in what looked like cake boxes into a horizontally oriented
    > machine in the server room at Uni (off limits to students, but one could
    > see the activity through the smoked-glass partitions). The faculty staff
    > were not forthcoming about the details, but the rest of the system
    > mostly comprised DEC workstations running Ultrix.


    Gods...horizontally-mounted tape units? I didn't see those
    until the mid-80's. We had a Datamec D3030 vacuum-loaded
    affair in high school (that thing was noisy with a capital
    N), and at work after college, we used a rather quieter
    unit that used tension-arms, until we moved and got a tape
    unit about the size of a filing cabinet that was fed through
    a slot in its front.

    6250 bpi. Woo.

    >
    >>> Thus Gates and Allen could be said to have created an original
    >>> product. One might even call it a true innovation.
    >>>
    >>> It would be one of their last. [/quote]

    > [...]
    >> The seed of the entire structure? An interesting thought.

    >
    > The seed of a rotten apple, certainly.
    >


    I wouldn't call it an apple. ;-) Especially in light of a certain
    Cupertino-based company.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    fortune: not found
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  17. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    * Homer peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > The (physically) biggest storage medium I've personally seen with was
    > open reel tapes, that had approx a 1ft diameter. They were being
    > top-loaded in what looked like cake boxes into a horizontally oriented
    > machine in the server room at Uni (off limits to students, but one could
    > see the activity through the smoked-glass partitions). The faculty staff
    > were not forthcoming about the details, but the rest of the system
    > mostly comprised DEC workstations running Ultrix.


    Just this weekend I was visiting my old graduate school haunts, though
    now moved into a spanking-new building. I was amused to see a couple of
    items I thought would be gone by now, in the labs.

    o patch panels

    How I remember making the connectors for those bulky boards!

    o PDP 11/23

    The prof who'd bought this thing for about $30K twenty-or-so years ago
    still uses it to run his experiments. And there it was, the big drawer
    marked RL02 which was, IIRC, the big hard-drive platen, slightly larger
    than a vinyl LP. Small amount of memory, but operates as solid as a
    rock.

    And then, that night, I watched a Windows XP laptop fail miserably
    (surprisingly, to me, if to no one else at the party) at playing a
    home-made video presentation.

    Even more ironic, since this wealthy institution was eaten up with
    Windows software.

    --
    We will never make a 32-bit operating system.
    -- Bill Gates, At the launch of MSX[3]

  18. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Linonut writes:

    > * Homer peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> The (physically) biggest storage medium I've personally seen with was
    >> open reel tapes, that had approx a 1ft diameter. They were being
    >> top-loaded in what looked like cake boxes into a horizontally oriented
    >> machine in the server room at Uni (off limits to students, but one could
    >> see the activity through the smoked-glass partitions). The faculty staff
    >> were not forthcoming about the details, but the rest of the system
    >> mostly comprised DEC workstations running Ultrix.

    >
    > Just this weekend I was visiting my old graduate school haunts, though
    > now moved into a spanking-new building. I was amused to see a couple of
    > items I thought would be gone by now, in the labs.
    >
    > o patch panels
    >
    > How I remember making the connectors for those bulky boards!
    >
    > o PDP 11/23
    >
    > The prof who'd bought this thing for about $30K twenty-or-so years ago
    > still uses it to run his experiments. And there it was, the big drawer
    > marked RL02 which was, IIRC, the big hard-drive platen, slightly larger
    > than a vinyl LP. Small amount of memory, but operates as solid as a
    > rock.
    >
    > And then, that night, I watched a Windows XP laptop fail miserably
    > (surprisingly, to me, if to no one else at the party) at playing a
    > home-made video presentation.
    >
    > Even more ironic, since this wealthy institution was eaten up with
    > Windows software.


    Hands up if your believe one word of Liarnut's rant?

    --
    "At BT Global, our crown jewels are the services we supply to our
    customers. With jNetX we own the intellectual property for our
    services, allowing us to evolve the services as and when required."
    Mark Kent,Head of Technology Strategy,COLA Hypocrite

  19. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:P0w2k.527$AJ6.431@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    >* Ron House peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> Homer wrote:
    >>> Verily I say unto thee, that The Ghost In The Machine spake thusly:
    >>>> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Ezekiel wrote on Thu, 5 Jun 2008
    >>>> 14:02:24 -0400 <7c456$48482a31$709@news.teranews.com>:
    >>>
    >>>>> Show me a single thing, anything, in linux that wasn't copied or
    >>>>> stolen.

    >>
    >> The source code for the kernel.

    >
    > Notice how ol' Zeke sticks in a weasel word to cover his ass: "copied".


    It's the same word that the "advocates" use whenever they claim that
    Microsoft never innovated anything. So where's the list of all these great
    new innovations from the FOSS community???? Everything I've ever seen in
    linux is "copied" from either Unix, Mac or Windows.


    > Thus, you can't raise a large number of examples of code that has no
    > equivalent in Windows, such as X-Windows, all the window managers,
    > compilers, the whole set of GNU software.
    >
    > Zeke doesn't have the courage of his convictions.


    And you don't have the ability to list any innovations from the FOSS
    copycats.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  20. Re: Innovation(tm) in Windows 7

    Verily I say unto thee, that Linonut spake thusly:

    > And then, that night, I watched a Windows XP laptop fail miserably
    > (surprisingly, to me, if to no one else at the party) at playing a
    > home-made video presentation.


    The more complex a system becomes, the more it tends towards failure.
    This applies equally to Linux, of course, however there are other
    "issues" that make closed sources, and Microsoft's closed sources in
    particular, problematic. Budget and time constraints, for example, and
    legacy API support for another.

    The same thing can be said about hardware, however there's also the
    issue of construction and material quality, which I believe has
    deteriorated considerably over the years. This may account for why
    certain museum pieces mysteriously still work perfectly, but machines
    bought 366 days ago (exactly one day after the warranty expired)
    suddenly develop terminal failure.

    > Even more ironic, since this wealthy institution was eaten up with
    > Windows software.


    Yeah well, I'm sure it seemed like a good idea at the time.


    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | 'When it comes to knowledge, "ownership" just doesn't make sense'
    | ~ Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. http://tinyurl.com/22bgx8
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.23.8-63.fc8
    15:03:59 up 172 days, 11:39, 0 users, load average: 0.33, 0.57, 0.29

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