Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling) - Linux

This is a discussion on Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling) - Linux ; Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track cassettes. And disco. RL Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share of Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August, reducing it to ...

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  1. Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track
    cassettes. And disco.

    RL

    Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share
    of Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August,
    reducing it to the same level of popularity as the open source Linux
    operating system, which saw its market share increase from 1.33 to
    1.34 in the same period. If the steady downward trend in Windows 98's
    market share continues, the popularity of Linux will soon surpass that
    of Microsoft's outdated, nine-year-old Windows version.

    This is a somewhat empty victory for Linux enthusiasts, who have been
    predicting the imminent arrival of the mythical "year of the Linux
    desktop" for as long as I've been a Linux user. Linux's 1.34 percent
    market share falls far short of the rosy 2008 estimates made by
    Siemens in 2003.

    The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser user
    agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5 thousand web sites,
    also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is still more popular than
    Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is quickly catching up to Windows
    2000 (3.94 percent). Within a year, we expect Vista to surpass both of
    these readily.

    Although market share statistics can provide valuable insight into
    software adoption trends, no method of gathering such information is
    completely reliable. One can often get a clearer picture by comparing
    statistics from multiple sources. Net Applications, which also
    provides monthly operating system market share statistics, shows Linux
    at 0.77 percent in August and Windows 98 at 0.98 percent.

    Although the popularity of Linux still doesn't rival that of Mac OS X
    or Windows on the desktop, the open-source operating system is
    accumulating broader industry support, a factor that could potentially
    lead to modest market share increases in the coming months. Dell, HP,
    and Lenovo are all offering Linux preinstalled on desktop or laptop
    systems in select markets, available to end users, and reportedly well-
    configured. We have some coming into the lab for a test, so stay
    tuned.
    -
    How Can Linux Market Share Be Accurately Measured?
    listen

    Friday October 26, 2007 12:34PM
    by Caitlyn Martin in Articles

    eWeek ran an article yesterday titled Linux Losing Market Share to
    Windows Server. The article quoted IDC sales figures.

  2. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    raylopez99 writes:

    > Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track
    > cassettes. And disco.
    >
    > RL
    >
    > Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share
    > of Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August,
    > reducing it to the same level of popularity as the open source Linux
    > operating system, which saw its market share increase from 1.33 to
    > 1.34 in the same period. If the steady downward trend in Windows 98's
    > market share continues, the popularity of Linux will soon surpass that
    > of Microsoft's outdated, nine-year-old Windows version.
    >
    > This is a somewhat empty victory for Linux enthusiasts, who have been
    > predicting the imminent arrival of the mythical "year of the Linux
    > desktop" for as long as I've been a Linux user. Linux's 1.34 percent
    > market share falls far short of the rosy 2008 estimates made by
    > Siemens in 2003.
    >
    > The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser user
    > agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5 thousand web sites,
    > also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is still more popular than
    > Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is quickly catching up to Windows
    > 2000 (3.94 percent). Within a year, we expect Vista to surpass both of
    > these readily.
    >
    > Although market share statistics can provide valuable insight into
    > software adoption trends, no method of gathering such information is
    > completely reliable. One can often get a clearer picture by comparing
    > statistics from multiple sources. Net Applications, which also
    > provides monthly operating system market share statistics, shows Linux
    > at 0.77 percent in August and Windows 98 at 0.98 percent.


    That ties in with the BBC's figures of 0.8%. Anecdotal evidence
    suggests Linux to be less than 1% on desktops.

    >
    > Although the popularity of Linux still doesn't rival that of Mac OS X
    > or Windows on the desktop, the open-source operating system is
    > accumulating broader industry support, a factor that could potentially
    > lead to modest market share increases in the coming months. Dell, HP,
    > and Lenovo are all offering Linux preinstalled on desktop or laptop
    > systems in select markets, available to end users, and reportedly well-
    > configured. We have some coming into the lab for a test, so stay
    > tuned.
    > -
    > How Can Linux Market Share Be Accurately Measured?
    > listen
    >
    > Friday October 26, 2007 12:34PM
    > by Caitlyn Martin in Articles
    >
    > eWeek ran an article yesterday titled Linux Losing Market Share to
    > Windows Server. The article quoted IDC sales figures.


    It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1%
    mark (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    some real advocacy then maybe this would change.


    --
    I was attacked by dselect as a small child and have since avoided
    debian.
    -- Andrew Morton

  3. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 12:16:58 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > raylopez99 writes:
    >
    >> Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track
    >> cassettes. And disco.
    >>
    >> RL
    >>
    >> Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share of
    >> Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August, reducing
    >> it to the same level of popularity as the open source Linux operating
    >> system, which saw its market share increase from 1.33 to 1.34 in the
    >> same period. If the steady downward trend in Windows 98's market share
    >> continues, the popularity of Linux will soon surpass that of
    >> Microsoft's outdated, nine-year-old Windows version.
    >>
    >> This is a somewhat empty victory for Linux enthusiasts, who have been
    >> predicting the imminent arrival of the mythical "year of the Linux
    >> desktop" for as long as I've been a Linux user. Linux's 1.34 percent
    >> market share falls far short of the rosy 2008 estimates made by Siemens
    >> in 2003.
    >>
    >> The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser user
    >> agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5 thousand web sites,
    >> also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is still more popular than
    >> Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is quickly catching up to Windows 2000
    >> (3.94 percent). Within a year, we expect Vista to surpass both of these
    >> readily.
    >>
    >> Although market share statistics can provide valuable insight into
    >> software adoption trends, no method of gathering such information is
    >> completely reliable. One can often get a clearer picture by comparing
    >> statistics from multiple sources. Net Applications, which also provides
    >> monthly operating system market share statistics, shows Linux at 0.77
    >> percent in August and Windows 98 at 0.98 percent.

    >
    > That ties in with the BBC's figures of 0.8%. Anecdotal evidence suggests
    > Linux to be less than 1% on desktops.
    >
    >
    >> Although the popularity of Linux still doesn't rival that of Mac OS X
    >> or Windows on the desktop, the open-source operating system is
    >> accumulating broader industry support, a factor that could potentially
    >> lead to modest market share increases in the coming months. Dell, HP,
    >> and Lenovo are all offering Linux preinstalled on desktop or laptop
    >> systems in select markets, available to end users, and reportedly well-
    >> configured. We have some coming into the lab for a test, so stay tuned.
    >> -
    >> How Can Linux Market Share Be Accurately Measured? listen
    >>
    >> Friday October 26, 2007 12:34PM
    >> by Caitlyn Martin in Articles
    >>
    >> eWeek ran an article yesterday titled Linux Losing Market Share to
    >> Windows Server. The article quoted IDC sales figures.

    >
    > It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1% mark
    > (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    > almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    > some real advocacy then maybe this would change.


    Except that the Linux server market share AND installed base is MUCH
    larger than the "desktop" market share and user base. And everyone knows
    that, except maybe you.



    --
    Rick

  4. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 05:58:58 -0500, Rick wrote:

    > On Wed, 21 May 2008 12:16:58 +0200, Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> raylopez99 writes:
    >>
    >>> Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track
    >>> cassettes. And disco.
    >>>
    >>> RL
    >>>
    >>> Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share of
    >>> Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August, reducing
    >>> it to the same level of popularity as the open source Linux operating
    >>> system, which saw its market share increase from 1.33 to 1.34 in the
    >>> same period. If the steady downward trend in Windows 98's market share
    >>> continues, the popularity of Linux will soon surpass that of
    >>> Microsoft's outdated, nine-year-old Windows version.
    >>>
    >>> This is a somewhat empty victory for Linux enthusiasts, who have been
    >>> predicting the imminent arrival of the mythical "year of the Linux
    >>> desktop" for as long as I've been a Linux user. Linux's 1.34 percent
    >>> market share falls far short of the rosy 2008 estimates made by Siemens
    >>> in 2003.
    >>>
    >>> The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser user
    >>> agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5 thousand web sites,
    >>> also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is still more popular than
    >>> Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is quickly catching up to Windows 2000
    >>> (3.94 percent). Within a year, we expect Vista to surpass both of these
    >>> readily.
    >>>
    >>> Although market share statistics can provide valuable insight into
    >>> software adoption trends, no method of gathering such information is
    >>> completely reliable. One can often get a clearer picture by comparing
    >>> statistics from multiple sources. Net Applications, which also provides
    >>> monthly operating system market share statistics, shows Linux at 0.77
    >>> percent in August and Windows 98 at 0.98 percent.

    >>
    >> That ties in with the BBC's figures of 0.8%. Anecdotal evidence suggests
    >> Linux to be less than 1% on desktops.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Although the popularity of Linux still doesn't rival that of Mac OS X
    >>> or Windows on the desktop, the open-source operating system is
    >>> accumulating broader industry support, a factor that could potentially
    >>> lead to modest market share increases in the coming months. Dell, HP,
    >>> and Lenovo are all offering Linux preinstalled on desktop or laptop
    >>> systems in select markets, available to end users, and reportedly well-
    >>> configured. We have some coming into the lab for a test, so stay tuned.
    >>> -
    >>> How Can Linux Market Share Be Accurately Measured? listen
    >>>
    >>> Friday October 26, 2007 12:34PM
    >>> by Caitlyn Martin in Articles
    >>>
    >>> eWeek ran an article yesterday titled Linux Losing Market Share to
    >>> Windows Server. The article quoted IDC sales figures.

    >>
    >> It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1% mark
    >> (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    >> almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    >> some real advocacy then maybe this would change.

    >
    > Except that the Linux server market share AND installed base is MUCH
    > larger than the "desktop" market share and user base. And everyone knows
    > that, except maybe you.


    Didn't you know? Quack's "Mr Know-it-All", except he knows nothing. I see
    the berk's still clinging to his 1% mantra, & his faith in the BBC website
    figures is rather touching, isn't it.

    --
    Mandriva 2008.1 64-bit.
    This message was sent from a
    computer which is guaranteed
    100% free of the M$ Windoze virus.

  5. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)


    "Rick" wrote in message
    news:UPydnZ-91OfvnanVnZ2dnUVZ_uGdnZ2d@supernews.com...
    > On Wed, 21 May 2008 12:16:58 +0200, Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> raylopez99 writes:
    >>
    >>> Yep, Linux is dead. Long live Linux. And Amiga. And 8-track
    >>> cassettes. And disco.
    >>>
    >>> RL
    >>>
    >>> Recent statistics released by W3Counter reveal that the market share of
    >>> Windows 98 fell from 1.44 percent to 1.34 percent in August, reducing
    >>> it to the same level of popularity as the open source Linux operating
    >>> system, which saw its market share increase from 1.33 to 1.34 in the
    >>> same period. If the steady downward trend in Windows 98's market share
    >>> continues, the popularity of Linux will soon surpass that of
    >>> Microsoft's outdated, nine-year-old Windows version.
    >>>
    >>> This is a somewhat empty victory for Linux enthusiasts, who have been
    >>> predicting the imminent arrival of the mythical "year of the Linux
    >>> desktop" for as long as I've been a Linux user. Linux's 1.34 percent
    >>> market share falls far short of the rosy 2008 estimates made by Siemens
    >>> in 2003.
    >>>
    >>> The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser user
    >>> agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5 thousand web sites,
    >>> also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is still more popular than
    >>> Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is quickly catching up to Windows 2000
    >>> (3.94 percent). Within a year, we expect Vista to surpass both of these
    >>> readily.
    >>>
    >>> Although market share statistics can provide valuable insight into
    >>> software adoption trends, no method of gathering such information is
    >>> completely reliable. One can often get a clearer picture by comparing
    >>> statistics from multiple sources. Net Applications, which also provides
    >>> monthly operating system market share statistics, shows Linux at 0.77
    >>> percent in August and Windows 98 at 0.98 percent.

    >>
    >> That ties in with the BBC's figures of 0.8%. Anecdotal evidence suggests
    >> Linux to be less than 1% on desktops.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Although the popularity of Linux still doesn't rival that of Mac OS X
    >>> or Windows on the desktop, the open-source operating system is
    >>> accumulating broader industry support, a factor that could potentially
    >>> lead to modest market share increases in the coming months. Dell, HP,
    >>> and Lenovo are all offering Linux preinstalled on desktop or laptop
    >>> systems in select markets, available to end users, and reportedly well-
    >>> configured. We have some coming into the lab for a test, so stay tuned.
    >>> -
    >>> How Can Linux Market Share Be Accurately Measured? listen
    >>>
    >>> Friday October 26, 2007 12:34PM
    >>> by Caitlyn Martin in Articles
    >>>
    >>> eWeek ran an article yesterday titled Linux Losing Market Share to
    >>> Windows Server. The article quoted IDC sales figures.

    >>
    >> It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1% mark
    >> (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    >> almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    >> some real advocacy then maybe this would change.

    >
    > Except that the Linux server market share AND installed base is MUCH
    > larger than the "desktop" market share and user base. And everyone knows
    > that, except maybe you.


    Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room. But
    even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all that he's
    interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there are 100-200
    desktops.



    > --
    > Rick



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On May 21, 4:43*am, "Ezekiel" wrote:
    >
    > Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room. But
    > even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all that he's
    > interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there are 100-200
    > desktops.
    >


    Yes, and once MSFT perfects their licensed virtualization product (or
    VMWare does, and/or if MSFT buys and licenses it), then every user can
    have any OS on their desktop to their heart's content, including Mac,
    Windows, PS/2, Unix, Linux, BeOS, Amiga, Dr. Dos simulation, IBM 360-
    os, and probably a half dozen others. As long as these users pay
    their licensing fee to Microsoft that is.

    And that's the way I like it.

    Ray Lopez

    A MSFT shareholder.

  7. Re: Try again, troll - Linux market share fallacies

    On May 21, 6:32*am, High Plains Thumper
    wrote:
    > raylopez99 wrote:
    > > Yep, Linux is dead. *Long live Linux. *And Amiga. *And 8-track
    > > *cassettes. *And disco.

    >
    >
    >
    > > The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser
    > > user agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5
    > > thousand web sites, also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is
    > > still more popular than Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is
    > > quickly catching up to Windows 2000 (3.94 percent). Within a
    > > year, we expect Vista to surpass both of these readily.

    >
    > Fallacy of using the W3 Schools statistics only takes into
    > account a small sampling of websites, does not correctly tally
    > Linux and Unix computers identified as Windows computers, to gain
    > access to Windows only accessibility requirements. *It also does
    > not take into account proxy access, which an IP address may be
    > used multiple times by multiple machines.
    >


    Proxy access affects all OSes equally. So, this does not affect the
    Linux count any more than it affects Windows. Or Mac OS X. And so very
    few websites have Windows only accessibility requirements any more. So
    there would be a small margin of error, but that's in any sampling.
    You have yet to show why web stats are invalid. Try again nymshifter.

  8. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    Hadron wrote:

    > It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1%
    > mark (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    > almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    > some real advocacy then maybe this would change.


    You wouldn't know advocacy if it bit you on the ass, Quack, so stfu.
    --
    Regards,
    [tv]

    ....Beware Romulans baring GIFs.

    Owner/Proprietor, Cheesus Crust Pizza Company
    Good to the last supper

  9. Re: Try again, troll - Linux market share fallacies

    cc writes:

    > On May 21, 6:32*am, High Plains Thumper
    > wrote:
    >> raylopez99 wrote:
    >> > Yep, Linux is dead. *Long live Linux. *And Amiga. *And 8-track
    >> > *cassettes. *And disco.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > The W3Counter's statistics, which are based on the web browser
    >> > user agent text of 33 million unique visitors to over 5
    >> > thousand web sites, also show that Mac OS X (3.73 percent) is
    >> > still more popular than Windows Vista (3.46 percent) and is
    >> > quickly catching up to Windows 2000 (3.94 percent). Within a
    >> > year, we expect Vista to surpass both of these readily.

    >>
    >> Fallacy of using the W3 Schools statistics only takes into
    >> account a small sampling of websites, does not correctly tally
    >> Linux and Unix computers identified as Windows computers, to gain
    >> access to Windows only accessibility requirements. *It also does
    >> not take into account proxy access, which an IP address may be
    >> used multiple times by multiple machines.
    >>

    >
    > Proxy access affects all OSes equally. So, this does not affect the
    > Linux count any more than it affects Windows. Or Mac OS X. And so very
    > few websites have Windows only accessibility requirements any more. So
    > there would be a small margin of error, but that's in any sampling.
    > You have yet to show why web stats are invalid. Try again nymshifter.


    The idiot known as HPT (for now) also forgets that W3Schools is more likely to
    have Linux visitors as Linux visitors tend to be more technically
    orientated.

    --
    If you take both of those factors together then WinXP is a flop, selling
    *less* than Win 98 by a factor of two.
    comp.os.linux.advocacy - where they the lunacy in advocacy

  10. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    raylopez99 wrote:

    > On May 21, 4:43*am, "Ezekiel" wrote:
    >>
    >> Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room.
    >> But even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all that
    >> he's interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there are
    >> 100-200 desktops.
    >>

    >
    > Yes, and once MSFT perfects their licensed virtualization product (or
    > VMWare does, and/or if MSFT buys and licenses it), then every user can
    > have any OS on their desktop to their heart's content, including Mac,
    > Windows, PS/2, Unix, Linux, BeOS, Amiga, Dr. Dos simulation, IBM 360-
    > os, and probably a half dozen others. As long as these users pay
    > their licensing fee to Microsoft that is.
    >
    > And that's the way I like it.
    >
    > Ray Lopez
    >
    > A MSFT shareholder.


    Wishful thinking par excellence!

  11. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    >Hadron quacked:
    >
    >> It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1%
    >> mark (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux to be
    >> almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling lies and tried
    >> some real advocacy then maybe this would change.


    Listen up, ****head. A bald-faced LIAR like you has got no right to
    be pointing fingers at others. What filthy liars like you call "lies"
    from the advocates are often merely arguable estimates.

    Just because some advocates may be a bit unrealistic does mean "the
    advocates are telling lies", you fscking POS.


  12. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    chrisv wrote:
    >> Hadron quacked:
    >>
    >>> It doesn't need to be accurate. Everyone knows its "around" the 1%
    >>> mark (I think less) since just peering over shoulders shows Linux
    >>> to be almost no where. If the advocates in COLA stopped telling
    >>> lies and tried some real advocacy then maybe this would change.

    >
    > Listen up, ****head. A bald-faced LIAR like you has got no right to
    > be pointing fingers at others. What filthy liars like you call "lies"
    > from the advocates are often merely arguable estimates.


    lmao!


    > Just because some advocates may be a bit unrealistic


    Yeah, just a wee bit.



    > does mean "the advocates are telling lies"


    Hey, you got something right for a change! Good job, moron!



    >, you fscking POS.


    chrisv, you're a petulant loser in real life every bit as much as you're a
    petulant loser on cola.




  13. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    SomeBloke wrote:

    >> Ray Lopez
    >>
    >> A MSFT shareholder.

    >
    >Wishful thinking par excellence!


    Does the trolling fsckwit want a cookie because he owns some M$ stock?


  14. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)


    >
    > A MSFT shareholder.


    Stock quotes, May 21, 2008 vs 1 year ago (source: Yahoo finance)
    First today, next a year ago, then percentage change

    MSFT 28.80 31.05 -7%
    AAPL 187.5 111.98 +67%
    GOOG 577 470 +23%

    Keep those MSFT shares!

  15. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 07:43:03 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:


    > Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room. But
    > even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all that he's
    > interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there are 100-200
    > desktops.


    Redhat admitted that there is no market for desktop Linux which is why it
    stopped producing it.

    Smart move on the part of Redhat.



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  16. Re: Try again, troll - Linux market share fallacies

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 14:21:04 +0200, Hadron wrote:



    > The idiot known as HPT (for now) also forgets that W3Schools is more likely to
    > have Linux visitors as Linux visitors tend to be more technically
    > orientated.


    Especially with all of these articles posted in COLA about Linux taking
    over school districts and the educational system.

    See how the Linux loons talk out of both sides of their pus filled mouths?


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  17. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 04:53:32 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    > On May 21, 4:43*am, "Ezekiel" wrote:
    >>
    >> Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room.
    >> But even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all
    >> that he's interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there
    >> are 100-200 desktops.
    >>
    >>

    > Yes, and once MSFT perfects their licensed virtualization product (or
    > VMWare does, and/or if MSFT buys and licenses it), then every user can
    > have any OS on their desktop to their heart's content, including Mac,
    > Windows, PS/2, Unix, Linux, BeOS, Amiga, Dr. Dos simulation, IBM 360-
    > os, and probably a half dozen others. As long as these users pay their
    > licensing fee to Microsoft that is.


    Really... let us know how everyone is going to be able to run OS X .

    And, using VMWare or Virtualbox, Most people can run a number of
    operating systems now.

    >
    > And that's the way I like it.


    Who cares what you like.

    >
    > Ray Lopez
    >
    > A MSFT shareholder.


    Who cares that you are a Microsoft shareholder?

    --
    Rick

  18. Re: Linux market share dead, dying (about 1.3% and falling)

    On Wed, 21 May 2008 12:15:06 -0400, Moshe. Goldfarb wrote:

    > On Wed, 21 May 2008 07:43:03 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Linux has done well as a free replacement for Unix in the server room.
    >> But even Linus admits that the desktop is the holy grail and is all
    >> that he's interested in. His reasoning is that for every server there
    >> are 100-200 desktops.

    >
    > Redhat admitted that there is no market for desktop Linux which is why
    > it stopped producing it.
    >
    > Smart move on the part of Redhat.


    .... which why they are still producing desktop Linux...

    --
    Rick

  19. Re: Try again, troll - Linux market share fallacies

    Moshe. Goldfarb wrote:
    > Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> The idiot known as HPT (for now) also forgets that W3Schools
    >> is more likely to have Linux visitors as Linux visitors tend
    >> to be more technically orientated.


    HPT filling in as proxy during Peter Kohlmann's absence:

    Way to go Hadron, "Usenet etiquette provocateur", "true Linux
    advocate", "Debian distro governor", "kernel hacker", "emacs
    user", "swapfile expert", "X specialist", "CUPS guru", "USB-disk
    server admin", "defragger professional", "newsreader magician",
    "hardware maven", "time coordinator", "email sage" and "OSS
    culling committee chairman" Hadron Quark, aka Hans Schneider, aka
    Richard, aka Damian O'Leary.

    Not true. Look at the demography:

    http://w3schools.com/about/about_pagehits.asp

    Visitors Demographics
    Origin Percent
    United States 42.1 %
    India 10.1 %
    United Kingdom 8.0 %
    Canada 4.7 %
    Netherlands 2.5 %
    Australia 2.3 %
    Germany 2.0 %
    Sweden 1.7 %
    France 1.7 %
    Spain 1.4 %
    Italy 1.3 %
    Singapore 1.3 %
    Brazil 1.2 %
    Philippines 1.1 %
    Hong Kong 1.1 %
    Poland 1.0 %
    US has greatest number of visits at 42.1%, which is heavily
    Windows oriented. Other countries that have a higher Linux and
    Unix count are under represented. Not all access the internet
    has heavily as the US. Therefore, to utilise such statistics as
    indicative of Linux installed base leads to erroneous results.

    > Especially with all of these articles posted in COLA about
    > Linux taking over school districts and the educational system.
    >
    > See how the Linux loons talk out of both sides of their pus
    > filled mouths?


    Interesting that PhlatPhish must resort to potty mouth tactics to
    express an opinion, because he has nothing worthy to say.

    --
    HPT

  20. Re: Try again, troll - Linux market share fallacies

    cc wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >
    >> Fallacy of using the W3 Schools statistics only takes into
    >> account a small sampling of websites, does not correctly
    >> tally Linux and Unix computers identified as Windows
    >> computers, to gain access to Windows only accessibility
    >> requirements. It also does not take into account proxy
    >> access, which an IP address may be used multiple times by
    >> multiple machines.

    >
    > Proxy access affects all OSes equally. So, this does not
    > affect the Linux count any more than it affects Windows. Or
    > Mac OS X. And so very few websites have Windows only
    > accessibility requirements any more. So there would be a small
    > margin of error, but that's in any sampling. You have yet to
    > show why web stats are invalid. Try again nymshifter.


    Well, have another troll with a problem of illiteracy, who homes
    in on one small item and ignores the post in total. Then must
    use insulting language to show his obnoxiousness.

    >> FALLACY OF USING THE W3 SCHOOLS STATISTICS ONLY TAKES INTO
    >> ACCOUNT A SMALL SAMPLING OF WEBSITES, DOES NOT CORRECTLY
    >> TALLY LINUX AND UNIX COMPUTERS IDENTIFIED AS WINDOWS
    >> COMPUTERS, TO GAIN ACCESS TO WINDOWS ONLY ACCESSIBILITY
    >> REQUIREMENTS.


    http://w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp

    Statistics Are Often Misleading

    You cannot - as a web developer - rely only on statistics.
    Statistics can often be misleading.

    Global averages may not always be relevant to your web site.
    Different sites attract different audiences. Some web sites
    attract professional developers using professional hardware,
    while other sites attract hobbyists using old low spec computers.

    Quotes

    "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics."
    Benjamin Disraeli
    OTOH, perhaps Microsoft is giving a boost to Apple, to increase
    OSX count over Linux:

    http://forums.microsoft.com/TechNet/...0914&SiteID=17

    Pete of New Hamphire

    Windows SP3 operating system identification error

    Downloaded and successfully installed SP3. System shutdown and
    restarted as required. Restart was successful.

    I then tried to go back to the update page to see if any
    additional updates exist. The MS Update page identified my
    operating system as a Mac system and provided the link to the MAC
    site for update purposes.

    The message reads: Thank you for your interest in obtaining
    updates from our site. This website is designed to work with
    Microsoft Windows operating systems only. To find updates for
    Microsoft products that are designed for Macintosh operating
    systems, please visit http://www.microsoft.com/mac/.

    My system is an XP Pro on a Dell 670

    How can this be corrected?
    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

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