1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop - Linux

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Thread: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

  1. 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    2nd place prize? Two copies



  2. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    DFS wrote:

    > 2nd place prize? Two copies


    If you were to spend the time you use dissing Linux on actually learning
    Linux, you wouldn't have to worry about you future employment
    possibilities.

    Wake up and smell the roses. Balmer's greed is killing Microsoft and Linux
    is filling the void. Instead of treating the change with fear, embrace it
    and be one of the winners rather than one of the hoard of losers, which are
    unable to make the transition.

    Ian

  3. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    On Wed, 14 May 2008 11:24:19 +0800, Ian Hilliard wrote:

    > DFS wrote:
    >
    >> 2nd place prize? Two copies

    >
    > If you were to spend the time you use dissing Linux on actually learning
    > Linux, you wouldn't have to worry about you future employment
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Wake up and smell the roses. Balmer's greed is killing Microsoft and Linux
    > is filling the void. Instead of treating the change with fear, embrace it
    > and be one of the winners rather than one of the hoard of losers, which are
    > unable to make the transition.
    >
    > Ian


    If the so called advocates in COLA spent time in the Linux help groups
    instead of slamming Microsoft in COLA maybe Linux wouldn't be sitting at
    0.6 percent of the desktop market.

    Just some advice.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  4. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  5. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Moshe Goldfarb writes:

    > On Wed, 14 May 2008 11:24:19 +0800, Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>
    >>> 2nd place prize? Two copies

    >>
    >> If you were to spend the time you use dissing Linux on actually learning
    >> Linux, you wouldn't have to worry about you future employment
    >> possibilities.
    >>
    >> Wake up and smell the roses. Balmer's greed is killing Microsoft and Linux
    >> is filling the void. Instead of treating the change with fear, embrace it
    >> and be one of the winners rather than one of the hoard of losers, which are
    >> unable to make the transition.
    >>
    >> Ian

    >
    > If the so called advocates in COLA spent time in the Linux help groups
    > instead of slamming Microsoft in COLA maybe Linux wouldn't be sitting at
    > 0.6 percent of the desktop market.
    >
    > Just some advice.


    Some of them do. Willy Poaster started hanging out in Ubuntu groups with
    some old arse called Harold Stevens. Both do nothing but harangue
    people with issues and have effectively killed the group.

    --
    Being overloaded is the sign of a true Debian maintainer.
    -- JHM on #Debian

  6. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    * Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    > development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because it
    > forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of tools.


    Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft APIs
    that come every few years.

    --
    If you show people the problems and you show people the solutions they will be
    moved to act.
    -- Bill Gates, At Live8 (2 July 2005) as reported in BBC News (4 July 2005)

  7. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:%9AWj.11821$C8.5819@bignews2.bellsouth.net...
    >* Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because it
    >> forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of tools.

    >
    > Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft APIs
    > that come every few years.


    Such as? Care to list any examples of these "quantum" API shifts? Surely
    you're still not whining about the change from Win16 to Win32 that took
    place in the early 1990's.




    >
    > --
    > If you show people the problems and you show people the solutions they
    > will be
    > moved to act.
    > -- Bill Gates, At Live8 (2 July 2005) as reported in BBC News (4 July
    > 2005)



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  8. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    "Ezekiel" writes:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    > news:%9AWj.11821$C8.5819@bignews2.bellsouth.net...
    >>* Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >>> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because it
    >>> forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of tools.

    >>
    >> Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft APIs
    >> that come every few years.

    >
    > Such as? Care to list any examples of these "quantum" API shifts? Surely
    > you're still not whining about the change from Win16 to Win32 that took
    > place in the early 1990's.



    Liarnut doesn't even know what an API is.

  9. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Linonut wrote:
    > * Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because
    >> it forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of
    >> tools.

    >
    > Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft
    > APIs that come every few years.


    Liar.



  10. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    "DFS" writes:

    > Linonut wrote:
    >> * Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >>> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because
    >>> it forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of
    >>> tools.

    >>
    >> Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft
    >> APIs that come every few years.

    >
    > Liar.
    >


    People are now beginning to see it for themselves. Liarnut is a liar and
    two faced hypocrite. He will probably reply with one of his embarrassing
    "" or something to make out he was merely joshing. He wasn't.

  11. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, DFS

    wrote
    on Wed, 14 May 2008 00:19:46 -0400
    :
    > Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>
    >>> 2nd place prize? Two copies

    >>
    >> If you were to spend the time you use dissing Linux on actually
    >> learning Linux,

    >
    > hmmm...what exactly should I learn about Linux?
    >


    What indeed? Bearing in mind my extreme pedancy one could
    learn, for example calls such as int $0x80, __NR_write,
    and Intel callgates[*]. At a slightly higher level one
    might learn semaphores, scheduling algorithms, resource
    virtualization, module loading. I consider this one
    optional for most, but I'm an old Unixhead and have a
    certain fondness for assembly language, though I rarely
    use it anymore, except to peruse the occasional Java
    BCEL dump.

    If one ventures out of pedantic mode one might learn
    about X, Gnome, KDE, and Xfce. The middle two are GUIs,
    or perhaps GUI frameworks would be a better description.
    The first is foundation tech for screen displays (which
    works at the "mouse hits area" level, as opposed to the
    "pointer hits window" level the user might be accustomed
    to). The last is a window manager.

    On a branch, one might contemplate various applications,
    of which Linux is lacking from an advertising standpoint
    (how many TV commercials has one seen for Konqueror?
    Cinelerra? OpenOffice? Ubuntu? I've seen *one* for Linux,
    and that was the IBM one with the basketball players)
    but there are plenty of apps and utilities, some of which
    might be useful.

    At a still higher level, one might contemplate concepts
    such as freedom, FOSS, and GPL. The road less traveled,
    as it were.

    >
    >> you wouldn't have to worry about you future employment
    >> possibilities.

    >
    > What makes you think I, or any Windows developer (including you and most
    > cola "advocates") is worried about future employment developing for the
    > Windows platform? Windows isn't going anywhere.


    More's the pity. ;-) But at some point it will become
    standardized as well; the basic Win32 call sequences such
    as MoveToEx(HDC,INT,INT,LPPOINT) are well known to most
    anyway, thanks to a combination of Windows documentation
    (now available online) and their general perversity
    (and why does a move call need an LPPOINT again?).

    >
    >
    >
    >> Wake up and smell the roses. Balmer's greed is killing Microsoft

    >
    > MS is not dying. It will outlast all of us here, that's for sure.


    IBM certainly has outgrown its humble roots in the early
    20th century as a manufacturer of tabulating machines.
    Standard Oil is still around (in some form).

    [snip for brevity]

    > Signed,
    > Ian
    > A Lifelong Windows Developer
    > Unwilling And Afraid To Switch To Linux


    ITYM "Unwilling to Switch to Linux Because It Doesn't Meet My Needs".
    Clearly it doesn't.

    >
    > (this would be decent advocacy if it had any relation to reality, if you
    > weren't still a Windows developer, and if you actually had the balls and
    > made a job switch to Linux. Sorry Ian... it phails!)
    >

    [*] the instructions will differ for different microprocessors;
    the precise setup is defined deep within /usr/src/linux/arch/*
    and only used by libc.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Error 16: Not enough space on file system to delete file(s)
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  12. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Linonut

    wrote
    on Wed, 14 May 2008 07:38:52 -0400
    <%9AWj.11821$C8.5819@bignews2.bellsouth.net>:
    > * Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because it
    >> forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of tools.

    >
    > Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft APIs
    > that come every few years.
    >


    And these are ... ? MoveToEx() is *still* in WinGDI.
    The only APIs I know have shifted are the ones for the
    drivers (I'll admit I don't know the details for those),
    RDO->ADO (I know very little about either), and something
    which I can only identify as a WinInet->WinHTTP transition
    internally, and that only because I happened to notice
    them while poking around hither and yon.

    Or are you referring to .NET? .NET is indeed a quantum
    shift in one respect, but when boiled down to its
    essentialls appears to be little more than the export of an
    intermediate compiler format, one level above machine code
    (anyone who's read what's colloquially called "the dragon
    book", so called because a green dragon is being attacked
    by a knight on the cover, will know about quadruplets,
    code hoisting, and peephole optimization; it was written
    by Aho and Ullman and its proper title is "Principles of
    Compiler Design", but everyone just calls it "the [green]
    dragon book": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Book).

    Nevertheless, .NET will revolutionize the industry --
    if Microsoft can clear out all of the other "revolutions"
    first. It'll be interesting to see if .NET will suffer the
    same fate as ActiveX, which allowed remote code to walk
    in the front door, settle into the library, and start
    rearchitecting the foyer. (Nowadays, he at least has
    to sign a writ of authenticity first. In Java's case,
    he's shown to the sandbox at the side of the house, and
    only allowed to rearchitect sand castles.)

    I'll also be curious as to what happens to WinFX, which was
    supposed to replace the Win32 muck.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    People think that libraries are safe. They're wrong. They have ideas.
    (Also occasionally ectoplasmic slime and cute librarians.)
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  13. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Hadron wrote:
    > "DFS" writes:
    >
    >> Linonut wrote:
    >>> * Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>
    >>>> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >>>> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because
    >>>> it forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of
    >>>> tools.
    >>>
    >>> Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft
    >>> APIs that come every few years.

    >>
    >> Liar.
    >>

    >
    > People are now beginning to see it for themselves. Liarnut is a liar
    > and two faced hypocrite. He will probably reply with one of his
    > embarrassing "" or something to make out he was merely
    > joshing. He wasn't.




  14. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Hadron wrote:

    > People are now beginning to see it for themselves. Liarnut is a liar
    > and two faced hypocrite. He will probably reply with one of his
    > embarrassing "" or something to make out he was merely
    > joshing. He wasn't.


    He's always been a hypocrite, but rarely a liar. But this silly "I'm
    spoiled by 64-bit Linux software" is a real wanker's statement, seeing as
    how it doesn't perform better (probably a little slower), and has the same
    features and functionality and help systems as the 32-bit version, and he
    wouldn't even know it was 64-bit if it didn't say so on the disk or
    occasionally on the screen.






  15. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    "DFS" writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >
    >> People are now beginning to see it for themselves. Liarnut is a liar
    >> and two faced hypocrite. He will probably reply with one of his
    >> embarrassing "" or something to make out he was merely
    >> joshing. He wasn't.

    >
    > He's always been a hypocrite, but rarely a liar. But this silly "I'm


    Nearly always a liar. He googles up stuff and posts it as if he is
    familiar with it. He does it ALL the time.

    > spoiled by 64-bit Linux software" is a real wanker's statement, seeing as
    > how it doesn't perform better (probably a little slower), and has the same
    > features and functionality and help systems as the 32-bit version, and he
    > wouldn't even know it was 64-bit if it didn't say so on the disk or
    > occasionally on the screen.


    Exactly. It is more lies.

  16. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    On Wed, 14 May 2008 12:16:31 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 14 May 2008 11:24:19 +0800, Ian Hilliard wrote:
    >>
    >>> DFS wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 2nd place prize? Two copies
    >>>
    >>> If you were to spend the time you use dissing Linux on actually learning
    >>> Linux, you wouldn't have to worry about you future employment
    >>> possibilities.
    >>>
    >>> Wake up and smell the roses. Balmer's greed is killing Microsoft and Linux
    >>> is filling the void. Instead of treating the change with fear, embrace it
    >>> and be one of the winners rather than one of the hoard of losers, which are
    >>> unable to make the transition.
    >>>
    >>> Ian

    >>
    >> If the so called advocates in COLA spent time in the Linux help groups
    >> instead of slamming Microsoft in COLA maybe Linux wouldn't be sitting at
    >> 0.6 percent of the desktop market.
    >>
    >> Just some advice.

    >
    > Some of them do. Willy Poaster started hanging out in Ubuntu groups with
    > some old arse called Harold Stevens. Both do nothing but harangue
    > people with issues and have effectively killed the group.


    Yea I noticed that.
    William Poaster is a total ass who is obsessed with filters.
    Never heard of the other guy though, but if he hangs out with Poaster he
    can't be too bright.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  17. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    * The Ghost In The Machine peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > Nevertheless, .NET will revolutionize the industry --
    > if Microsoft can clear out all of the other "revolutions"
    > first. It'll be interesting to see if .NET will suffer the
    > same fate as ActiveX, which allowed remote code to walk
    > in the front door, settle into the library, and start
    > rearchitecting the foyer. (Nowadays, he at least has
    > to sign a writ of authenticity first. In Java's case,
    > he's shown to the sandbox at the side of the house, and
    > only allowed to rearchitect sand castles.)


    ..NET ain't gonna revolutionize /****/, in spite of having some cool
    technology.

    No company that values stability in an API is going to build on it.

    (Cue Tim to provide a list of companies that obviously do not value
    stability in an API. )

    Microsoft wants you to rewrite your apps every few years, so you can pay
    them for another round of "technology refreshes".

    > I'll also be curious as to what happens to WinFX, which was
    > supposed to replace the Win32 muck.


    Like I said about the periodic sea changes...

    Anyway, I am being a bit unfair, as many many changes occur without
    Microsoft being involved. What's the big one now? Ruby?

    And, going by the example of a Windows web-based project another group
    is doing, there's always a half-dozen different languages involved in a
    Microsoft project anyway.

    --
    Life is not fair; get used to it.
    -- Bill Gates

  18. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    On Wed, 14 May 2008 13:58:03 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > "Ezekiel" writes:
    >
    >> "Linonut" wrote in message
    >> news:%9AWj.11821$C8.5819@bignews2.bellsouth.net...
    >>>* Ian Hilliard peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>>
    >>>> A computer system's engineer, who understands that cross platform
    >>>> development guarantees the best results at the lowest cost, because it
    >>>> forces cleaner development and provides access to a wider set of tools.
    >>>
    >>> Not to mention having to deal with the quantum shifts in Microsoft APIs
    >>> that come every few years.

    >>
    >> Such as? Care to list any examples of these "quantum" API shifts? Surely
    >> you're still not whining about the change from Win16 to Win32 that took
    >> place in the early 1990's.

    >
    >
    > Liarnut doesn't even know what an API is.


    That's for sure.
    Linonut is just parroting Roy Schestowitz who is yet another dim bulb.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  19. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    Linonut writes:

    > * The Ghost In The Machine peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> Nevertheless, .NET will revolutionize the industry --
    >> if Microsoft can clear out all of the other "revolutions"
    >> first. It'll be interesting to see if .NET will suffer the
    >> same fate as ActiveX, which allowed remote code to walk
    >> in the front door, settle into the library, and start
    >> rearchitecting the foyer. (Nowadays, he at least has
    >> to sign a writ of authenticity first. In Java's case,
    >> he's shown to the sandbox at the side of the house, and
    >> only allowed to rearchitect sand castles.)

    >
    > .NET ain't gonna revolutionize /****/, in spite of having some cool
    > technology.
    >
    > No company that values stability in an API is going to build on it.
    >
    > (Cue Tim to provide a list of companies that obviously do not value
    > stability in an API. )
    >
    > Microsoft wants you to rewrite your apps every few years, so you can pay
    > them for another round of "technology refreshes".


    Care to back this up Liarnut?

  20. Re: 1st place prize: Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Slop

    On Wed, 14 May 2008 17:12:57 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > Linonut writes:
    >
    >> * The Ghost In The Machine peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> Nevertheless, .NET will revolutionize the industry --
    >>> if Microsoft can clear out all of the other "revolutions"
    >>> first. It'll be interesting to see if .NET will suffer the
    >>> same fate as ActiveX, which allowed remote code to walk
    >>> in the front door, settle into the library, and start
    >>> rearchitecting the foyer. (Nowadays, he at least has
    >>> to sign a writ of authenticity first. In Java's case,
    >>> he's shown to the sandbox at the side of the house, and
    >>> only allowed to rearchitect sand castles.)

    >>
    >> .NET ain't gonna revolutionize /****/, in spite of having some cool
    >> technology.
    >>
    >> No company that values stability in an API is going to build on it.
    >>
    >> (Cue Tim to provide a list of companies that obviously do not value
    >> stability in an API. )
    >>
    >> Microsoft wants you to rewrite your apps every few years, so you can pay
    >> them for another round of "technology refreshes".

    >
    > Care to back this up Liarnut?


    Poor Liarnut

    He's going down faster than the Hindenburg!

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

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