Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care." - Linux

This is a discussion on Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care." - Linux ; http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/opinions/6481/1/ The problem is that the community has done a deplorable job of explaining itself to outsiders. Focused on the immediate concerns of developers, the Open Source Definition lists only one right out of ten (to redistribute the software) that ...

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Thread: Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."

  1. Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."


    http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/opinions/6481/1/



    The problem is that the community has done a deplorable job of explaining
    itself to outsiders. Focused on the immediate concerns of developers, the
    Open Source Definition lists only one right out of ten (to redistribute the
    software) that might be of interest to average computer users.

    The problem with explaining FOSS in terms of source code is that, unless
    you're a developer, source code is only the means to an end. As Peter Brown,
    the executive director of the Free Software Foundation, pointed out to me a
    couple of years ago, promoting FOSS in terms of source code is like
    promoting recycling in terms of the technical details of recycling, such as
    the temperature at which certain plastics melt or the chemical processes
    that occur in an operating smelter--basically, most people don't care.

    If FOSS is ever going to gain a strong foothold outside its own community,
    its advocates need to adopt a similar approach. Outside of their own
    circles, they need to stop talking about being able to change the source
    code, which will only produce stony-faced indifference in the average
    listener.



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  2. Re: Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."

    On Thu, 8 May 2008 10:34:31 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/opinions/6481/1/
    >
    >
    >
    > The problem is that the community has done a deplorable job of explaining
    > itself to outsiders. Focused on the immediate concerns of developers, the
    > Open Source Definition lists only one right out of ten (to redistribute the
    > software) that might be of interest to average computer users.
    >
    > The problem with explaining FOSS in terms of source code is that, unless
    > you're a developer, source code is only the means to an end. As Peter Brown,
    > the executive director of the Free Software Foundation, pointed out to me a
    > couple of years ago, promoting FOSS in terms of source code is like
    > promoting recycling in terms of the technical details of recycling, such as
    > the temperature at which certain plastics melt or the chemical processes
    > that occur in an operating smelter--basically, most people don't care.
    >
    > If FOSS is ever going to gain a strong foothold outside its own community,
    > its advocates need to adopt a similar approach. Outside of their own
    > circles, they need to stop talking about being able to change the source
    > code, which will only produce stony-faced indifference in the average
    > listener.
    >


    Well at least someobdy in the Linux community gets it.
    Seriously, these days most people just want things to *work* and they don't
    have the time to care why or how.

    Example: 40 years ago when televisions had tubes, many people who were not
    technical types by day, still had a knowledge of tubes and that failed
    tubes were common and typically were the cause of television set problems.

    Every corner drug store had a tube testing machine and people who were
    having problems with their sets would pull the tubes and bring them to the
    store and test them.

    These days?

    Most people want to plug the thing in and tune in to some moronic reality
    show.

    The same can be said of computers and as the first generation of computer
    users ages, this is becoming even more prevalent.

    People want to use the mainstream gadgetry and don't care how it works as
    long as it works and keeps on working and is compatible with what others
    are using.



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  4. Re: Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."


    "Moshe Goldfarb" wrote in message
    news:8tjyjucz4jp6$.n13465ytdlqv$.dlg@40tude.net...
    > On Thu, 8 May 2008 10:34:31 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/opinions/6481/1/
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The problem is that the community has done a deplorable job of explaining
    >> itself to outsiders. Focused on the immediate concerns of developers, the
    >> Open Source Definition lists only one right out of ten (to redistribute
    >> the
    >> software) that might be of interest to average computer users.
    >>
    >> The problem with explaining FOSS in terms of source code is that, unless
    >> you're a developer, source code is only the means to an end. As Peter
    >> Brown,
    >> the executive director of the Free Software Foundation, pointed out to me
    >> a
    >> couple of years ago, promoting FOSS in terms of source code is like
    >> promoting recycling in terms of the technical details of recycling, such
    >> as
    >> the temperature at which certain plastics melt or the chemical processes
    >> that occur in an operating smelter--basically, most people don't care.
    >>
    >> If FOSS is ever going to gain a strong foothold outside its own
    >> community,
    >> its advocates need to adopt a similar approach. Outside of their own
    >> circles, they need to stop talking about being able to change the source
    >> code, which will only produce stony-faced indifference in the average
    >> listener.
    >>

    >
    > Well at least someobdy in the Linux community gets it.
    > Seriously, these days most people just want things to *work* and they
    > don't
    > have the time to care why or how.
    >
    > Example: 40 years ago when televisions had tubes, many people who were
    > not
    > technical types by day, still had a knowledge of tubes and that failed
    > tubes were common and typically were the cause of television set problems.
    >
    > Every corner drug store had a tube testing machine and people who were
    > having problems with their sets would pull the tubes and bring them to the
    > store and test them.
    >
    > These days?
    >
    > Most people want to plug the thing in and tune in to some moronic reality
    > show.
    >
    > The same can be said of computers and as the first generation of computer
    > users ages, this is becoming even more prevalent.
    >
    > People want to use the mainstream gadgetry and don't care how it works as
    > long as it works and keeps on working and is compatible with what others
    > are using.



    Unlike the COLA "advocates" - this guy does get it." I always find it
    hillarious and moronic how the COLA "advocates" tout that everyone should be
    using linux and then they come up with the absolute dumbest reasons for it.

    They'll talk about 'free as in freedom' and that people will no longer be a
    slave to Microsoft. Just about everyone I know has a computer and they all
    run either Windows or OSX. Not a single one of them has ever mentioned how
    they're a "slave" to Microsoft or Apple. What sort of twisted benefit of
    using linux is that?

    Then there's the classic "you get the source code to your apps" reason for
    using linux. Well... getting the source code to your apps is about as useful
    as giving someone the schematic diagram to their computer or DVD player.
    It's all but useless to over 99% of the population.

    When people hear these moronic "benefits" of linux it's no wonder that they
    don't consider any of these things a benefit at all.




    > --
    > Moshe Goldfarb
    > Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    > Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    > http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. Re: Peter Brown, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation -- "basically, most people don't care."

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:

    > These days?
    >
    > Most people want to plug the thing in and tune in to some moronic
    > reality show.


    Leave Top Chef alone!


    > The same can be said of computers and as the first generation of
    > computer users ages, this is becoming even more prevalent.
    >
    > People want to use the mainstream gadgetry and don't care how it
    > works as long as it works and keeps on working and is compatible with
    > what others are using.


    Aye.



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