marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data - Linux

This is a discussion on marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data - Linux ; http://marketshare.hitslink.com/april.aspx > Corrections to April Data > > > The April, 2008 market share data has some significant variations from established trends. The following major anomalies occurred on April 18th: > > # A 25% increase in visitors > # ...

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Thread: marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data

  1. marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data

    http://marketshare.hitslink.com/april.aspx

    > Corrections to April Data
    >
    >
    > The April, 2008 market share data has some significant variations from established trends. The following major anomalies occurred on April 18th:
    >
    > # A 25% increase in visitors
    > # A 3% drop in Firefox share
    > # A 4.9% increase in Internet Explorer 6.0 share
    > # A 3.4% increase in Windows XP share (with a small drop in Mac share)
    > # A .7% drop in Windows Vista share
    >
    > Since April 18th, all trends have returned to expected values, including an expected uptick in Vista share due to the release of SP1.
    >
    > Once we discovered the extent of the variations, we have worked diligently to discover the cause. The variations were coincidental to the release of Vista SP1 to automatic updates, so we initially thought there might be a connection. However, our investigation showed Vista SP1 had nothing to do with the problem.
    >
    > What happened was a distributed collection of sites inadvertently caused the problem. We can't identity the sites responsible, but the nature of the problem is that all the millions of new visitors we saw were part of a massive marketing campaign that only worked on Internet Explorer. Since the campaign only ran on Internet Explorer, it caused respective drops in Firefox, Safari and Opera share. Also, operating systems that do not have significant Internet Explorer share were impacted, especially the Mac.
    >
    > As of 6am on May 7th, the skewing data has been removed.


  2. Re: marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data

    ____/ Matt on Thursday 08 May 2008 03:43 : \____

    > http://marketshare.hitslink.com/april.aspx
    >
    >> Corrections to April Data
    >>
    >>
    >> The April, 2008 market share data has some significant variations from
    >> established trends. The following major anomalies occurred on April 18th:
    >>
    >> # A 25% increase in visitors
    >> # A 3% drop in Firefox share
    >> # A 4.9% increase in Internet Explorer 6.0 share
    >> # A 3.4% increase in Windows XP share (with a small drop in Mac share)
    >> # A .7% drop in Windows Vista share
    >>
    >> Since April 18th, all trends have returned to expected values, including an
    >> expected uptick in Vista share due to the release of SP1.
    >>
    >> Once we discovered the extent of the variations, we have worked diligently
    >> to discover the cause. The variations were coincidental to the release of
    >> Vista SP1 to automatic updates, so we initially thought there might be a
    >> connection. However, our investigation showed Vista SP1 had nothing to do
    >> with the problem.
    >>
    >> What happened was a distributed collection of sites inadvertently caused the
    >> problem. We can't identity the sites responsible, but the nature of the
    >> problem is that all the millions of new visitors we saw were part of a
    >> massive marketing campaign that only worked on Internet Explorer. Since the
    >> campaign only ran on Internet Explorer, it caused respective drops in
    >> Firefox, Safari and Opera share. Also, operating systems that do not have
    >> significant Internet Explorer share were impacted, especially the Mac.
    >>
    >> As of 6am on May 7th, the skewing data has been removed.


    The most important ingredients are these: which sites do they sample, how do
    they apply weighting, how do they treat unidentified strings (e.g. X11),
    dynamic IPs or proxies, and how do they identify zombie PCs (approx.
    320,000,000 computers that tour the Web as IE/Win32)?

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | "Error, no keyboard - press F1 to continue"
    http://Schestowitz.com | GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Mem: 515500k total, 445484k used, 70016k free, 968k buffers
    http://iuron.com - next generation of search paradigms

  3. Re: marketshare.hitslink.com: Corrections to April Data

    * Matt peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > http://marketshare.hitslink.com/april.aspx
    >
    >> Corrections to April Data
    >>
    >> The April, 2008 market share data has some significant variations from established trends. The following major anomalies occurred on April 18th:
    >>
    >> # A 25% increase in visitors
    >> # A 3% drop in Firefox share
    >> # A 4.9% increase in Internet Explorer 6.0 share
    >> # A 3.4% increase in Windows XP share (with a small drop in Mac share)
    >> # A .7% drop in Windows Vista share
    >>
    >> What happened was a distributed collection of sites inadvertently
    >> caused the problem. We can't identity the sites responsible, but the
    >> nature of the problem is that all the millions of new visitors we saw
    >> were part of a massive marketing campaign that only worked on
    >> Internet Explorer. Since the campaign only ran on Internet Explorer,
    >> it caused respective drops in Firefox, Safari and Opera share.
    >> Also, operating systems that do not have significant Internet
    >> Explorer share were impacted, especially the Mac.


    "Marketing campaign"?

    Sounds more like a "Microsoft Munchkin" campaign.

    And yet OK still had time to post here, ha ha.

    --
    I laid out memory so the bottom 640K was general purpose RAM and the upper
    384 I reserved for video and ROM, and things like that. That is why they
    talk about the 640K limit. It is actually a limit, not of the software, in
    any way, shape, or form, it is the limit of the microprocessor. That thing
    generates addresses, 20-bits addresses, that only can address a megabyte of
    memory. And, therefore, all the applications are tied to that limit. It was
    ten times what we had before. But to my surprise, we ran out of that address
    base for applications within... oh five or six years people were
    complaining.
    -- Bill Gates, Smithsonian Institution interview (1993)

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