file system - Linux

This is a discussion on file system - Linux ; I have e2fsprogs and the development package. There doesn't seem to be any texi or man pages for development. I want to sudy ext2-3 alot more and maybe add a capability to it. When can I learn online about filesystem ...

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  1. file system

    I have e2fsprogs and the development package. There doesn't seem to be
    any texi or man pages for development. I want to sudy ext2-3 alot more and
    maybe add a capability to it. When can I learn online about filesystem
    formats and development? If anyone would happen to have this info I tried
    google and I get some general info but no tutorials or references.

    Bill



  2. Re: file system

    "Bill Cunningham" writes:

    > I have e2fsprogs and the development package. There doesn't seem to be
    > any texi or man pages for development. I want to sudy ext2-3 alot more and
    > maybe add a capability to it. When can I learn online about filesystem
    > formats and development? If anyone would happen to have this info I tried
    > google and I get some general info but no tutorials or references.


    It's not too far off to say you really need to be able to figure out
    how it works from reading the code before you should be trying to
    modify it.

    Also, writing a FUSE filesystem to do... well, just about anything,
    really... would be an excellent warmup.

    Years ago, my university used Minix in our operating systems class.
    One semester I assigned a trivial filesystem modification change for
    the term project. Oops. The thing about that project was that a bug
    in the student's code typically meant reinstalling Minix, which took
    long enough to be *really* annoying.

  3. Re: file system

    On Wed, 07 May 2008 19:28:14 -0600 Joe Pfeiffer wrote:
    | "Bill Cunningham" writes:
    |
    |> I have e2fsprogs and the development package. There doesn't seem to be
    |> any texi or man pages for development. I want to sudy ext2-3 alot more and
    |> maybe add a capability to it. When can I learn online about filesystem
    |> formats and development? If anyone would happen to have this info I tried
    |> google and I get some general info but no tutorials or references.
    |
    | It's not too far off to say you really need to be able to figure out
    | how it works from reading the code before you should be trying to
    | modify it.

    I disagree that reading the code is the way to figure out how it works. But
    reading the code certainly is necessary if one wants to change how it works.
    Code can sometimes be misleading and often makes no distinction between how
    something is accomplished vs. what is to be accomplished. There are books
    and papers on filesystems in general and some on ext2/3/4 in particular.
    They would be the best starting points. If the OP has already studied
    filesystems in general, then he can move on to ext2/3/4.

    I do suggest that if he is expecting his idea to be useful by others, he
    do look at ext4 as the basis for his development, with backporting to
    ext2/3.


    | Also, writing a FUSE filesystem to do... well, just about anything,
    | really... would be an excellent warmup.

    Agreed. The OP should get his feet wet, first (if they are dry).


    | Years ago, my university used Minix in our operating systems class.
    | One semester I assigned a trivial filesystem modification change for
    | the term project. Oops. The thing about that project was that a bug
    | in the student's code typically meant reinstalling Minix, which took
    | long enough to be *really* annoying.

    Various virtualization systems we have to choose from today helps make that
    kind of problem a thing of the past. The OP should get one of those going
    for testing any kernel changes. Even experienced kernel developers can end
    up with frozen machines or worse, at times. Of course some of us have spare
    hardware to play with, too.

    --
    |WARNING: Due to extreme spam, googlegroups.com is blocked. Due to ignorance |
    | by the abuse department, bellsouth.net is blocked. If you post to |
    | Usenet from these places, find another Usenet provider ASAP. |
    | Phil Howard KA9WGN (email for humans: first name in lower case at ipal.net) |

  4. Re: file system

    phil-news-nospam@ipal.net writes:

    > On Wed, 07 May 2008 19:28:14 -0600 Joe Pfeiffer wrote:
    > | "Bill Cunningham" writes:
    > |
    > |> I have e2fsprogs and the development package. There doesn't seem to be
    > |> any texi or man pages for development. I want to sudy ext2-3 alot more and
    > |> maybe add a capability to it. When can I learn online about filesystem
    > |> formats and development? If anyone would happen to have this info I tried
    > |> google and I get some general info but no tutorials or references.
    > |
    > | It's not too far off to say you really need to be able to figure out
    > | how it works from reading the code before you should be trying to
    > | modify it.
    >
    > I disagree that reading the code is the way to figure out how it works. But
    > reading the code certainly is necessary if one wants to change how it works.
    > Code can sometimes be misleading and often makes no distinction between how
    > something is accomplished vs. what is to be accomplished. There are books
    > and papers on filesystems in general and some on ext2/3/4 in particular.
    > They would be the best starting points. If the OP has already studied
    > filesystems in general, then he can move on to ext2/3/4.


    That was a particular response to a particular OP, based both on this
    question and on the other questions he's been asking over the last
    several weeks. It isn't so much that the best way to learn the
    filesystem is to read the code, it's that you have to have enough
    experience reading code to be able to do that -- and he doesn't.
    >
    > | Also, writing a FUSE filesystem to do... well, just about anything,
    > | really... would be an excellent warmup.
    >
    > Agreed. The OP should get his feet wet, first (if they are dry).


    Based on his questions, his feet are up in the high desert.

    > | Years ago, my university used Minix in our operating systems class.
    > | One semester I assigned a trivial filesystem modification change for
    > | the term project. Oops. The thing about that project was that a bug
    > | in the student's code typically meant reinstalling Minix, which took
    > | long enough to be *really* annoying.
    >
    > Various virtualization systems we have to choose from today helps make that
    > kind of problem a thing of the past. The OP should get one of those going
    > for testing any kernel changes. Even experienced kernel developers can end
    > up with frozen machines or worse, at times. Of course some of us have spare
    > hardware to play with, too.


    We might want to explore going back because of that...

  5. Re: file system

    I have a minix disk and Andrew Tannebaum's "Operating Systems" Minix is
    the simplest system I know to use. What the minix filesystem has to do with
    ex2 and ex3 I don't know but maybe I have my sights set too high.

    Bill



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