Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software - Linux ; * Rodney Quaye peremptorily fired off this memo: > This post was originally posted on Groklaw ( http://www.groklaw.net ), but was > censored. > > . . . > > Groklaw, at its worst, is just merely a portal of ...

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Thread: Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

  1. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    * Rodney Quaye peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > This post was originally posted on Groklaw (http://www.groklaw.net), but was
    > censored.
    >
    > . . .
    >
    > Groklaw, at its worst, is just merely a portal of the Corporate Media,
    > funneling the narrow minded perspectives of callous journalist, in service
    > of their Corporate masters: those who pay for their existence through
    > advertising.


    Hey, wack job!

    1. Groklaw is a glorified blog with a nice database of information.

    2. Groklaw doesn't contain any advertising that I can see.

    --
    There are people who don't like capitalism, and people who don't like PCs. But
    there's no one who likes the PC who doesn't like Microsoft.[3]
    -- Bill Gates

  2. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    ____/ Linonut on Wednesday 07 May 2008 16:31 : \____

    > * Rodney Quaye peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> This post was originally posted on Groklaw (http://www.groklaw.net), but was
    >> censored.
    >>
    >> . . .
    >>
    >> Groklaw, at its worst, is just merely a portal of the Corporate Media,
    >> funneling the narrow minded perspectives of callous journalist, in service
    >> of their Corporate masters: those who pay for their existence through
    >> advertising.

    >
    > Hey, wack job!
    >
    > 1. Groklaw is a glorified blog with a nice database of information.
    >
    > 2. Groklaw doesn't contain any advertising that I can see.


    It contains too much true. It could lead to dancing^tm... or attempts to attack
    one's reputation.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | "I feed my 3 penguins with electricity and love"
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    02:20:01 up 23 days, 32 min, 3 users, load average: 1.04, 0.88, 1.34
    http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project

  3. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    On Thu, 08 May 2008 02:22:39 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:


    > It contains too much true. It could lead to dancing^tm... or attempts to attack
    > one's reputation.


    Eight years of college and this is how you write?
    No wonder you are still in school Roy Schestowitz.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  4. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    > On Thu, 08 May 2008 02:22:39 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >
    >> It contains too much true. It could lead to dancing^tm... or
    >> attempts to attack one's reputation.

    >
    > Eight years of college and this is how you write?
    > No wonder you are still in school Roy Schestowitz.


    Did you read Rube's posts? That guy was a moron: "It;s amazing that
    creatitivity people can hav when they are not education with microsoft
    products."

    This sentence by Kelsey "Kill The Clerk" Bjarnason contains nine commas:
    "If one includes comparable numbers of apps in Windows, one is still left
    with a problem, to wit, most Windows apps are *not* open source, meaning
    it's nigh-on impossible to check the code... and there's little expectation
    that a vulnerability reported to the makers of, say, the Acrobat Reader will
    be reported, by those makers, whereas by and large, most Linux app vendors
    _do_ tend to report vulnerabilities."

    That tops his earlier efforts of seven commas in one sentence: "...the one
    the world sees, with the public IP, and the internal one, with the private
    IP, so that when we, internally, browse a site by name, we get the internal
    address and can thus see the site?"

    This Kelsey howler has 10 commas across two independent clauses: "MS's
    inability to design UIs, however, means that when you change the IP address,
    you're not actually changing the IP address; this makes it not just
    completely worthless, but actually detrimental, since it leads the user to
    think the changes should, in fact, work, when, in reality, he hasn't
    actually changed anything that makes a difference."

    He's subconsciously mimicking the stutter/freeze/pause of his crapware OS...





  5. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    DFS wrote:

    > He's subconsciously mimicking the stutter/freeze/pause of his
    > crapware OS...


    called Windows.

    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  6. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    DFS wrote:
    > This sentence by Kelsey "Kill The Clerk" Bjarnason contains nine commas:


    What would you recommend? An increased use of semicolons?
    The comma is used to indicate a slight pause. Not, say, the end of a
    sentence length pause, but a pause to emphasise the rhythm of a sentence,
    say, like this one. The semicolon has a similar use but it's fallen out of
    favour and most people don't know how to use it in non-programming
    environments anymore.

    > That tops his earlier efforts of seven commas in one sentence: "...the one
    > the world sees, with the public IP, and the internal one, with the private
    > IP, so that when we, internally, browse a site by name, we get the internal
    > address and can thus see the site?"


    It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional (as in altering
    the meaning of something). The cosmetic use is just for sentence pace and
    rhythm.

    --
    | spike1@freenet.co.uk | |
    | Andrew Halliwell BSc | "ARSE! GERLS!! DRINK! DRINK! DRINK!!!" |
    | in | "THAT WOULD BE AN ECUMENICAL MATTER!...FECK!!!! |
    | Computer Science | - Father Jack in "Father Ted" |

  7. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    On 2008-05-10, Andrew Halliwell claimed:
    > DFS wrote:


    >> That tops his earlier efforts of seven commas in one sentence: "...the one
    >> the world sees, with the public IP, and the internal one, with the private
    >> IP, so that when we, internally, browse a site by name, we get the internal
    >> address and can thus see the site?"

    >
    > It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional (as in altering
    > the meaning of something). The cosmetic use is just for sentence pace and
    > rhythm.


    Poor DuFuS. No real job. No job he can brag about. No job he could list
    on a resumè that wouldn't sink his chances of getting a job like normal
    people in the future. MS has him chasing down commas in sentences. And
    problem posts from 5 years and more back. And posts by people who think
    some software broke their CPU or BIOS just by the act of installing it.

    --
    Don't throw your PC out of the window. Throw Windows out of your PC.

  8. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    Sinister Midget writes:

    > On 2008-05-10, Andrew Halliwell claimed:
    >> DFS wrote:

    >
    >>> That tops his earlier efforts of seven commas in one sentence: "...the one
    >>> the world sees, with the public IP, and the internal one, with the private
    >>> IP, so that when we, internally, browse a site by name, we get the internal
    >>> address and can thus see the site?"

    >>
    >> It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional (as in altering
    >> the meaning of something). The cosmetic use is just for sentence pace and
    >> rhythm.

    >
    > Poor DuFuS. No real job. No job he can brag about. No job he could list
    > on a resumè that wouldn't sink his chances of getting a job like normal
    > people in the future. MS has him chasing down commas in sentences. And
    > problem posts from 5 years and more back. And posts by people who think
    > some software broke their CPU or BIOS just by the act of installing it.


    I think you missed the point. Again. He was pointing out that Kelsey is
    a long winded, pretentious prick with ideas of grandeur. It often
    happens to big fish in small tape rooms.

  9. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    > DFS wrote:
    >> This sentence by Kelsey "Kill The Clerk" Bjarnason contains nine
    >> commas:

    >
    > What would you recommend? An increased use of semicolons?


    One-third as many commas.

    Maybe Kelsey's English teacher was a Linux developer? Bad writing --> bad
    code?



    > It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional (as in
    > altering the meaning of something). The cosmetic use is just for
    > sentence pace and rhythm.


    But it does matter. Only a low-standards cola nut like yourself would
    excuse such a comma-crazy, stuttering sentence: "...leads the user to think
    the changes should, in fact, work, when, in reality, he hasn't actually
    changed anything..."

    Misuse punctuation like that in the work world and your boss will take your
    email priveleges away.

    Here's a normal version: "...leads the user to think the changes should
    work, when in reality he hasn't actually changed anything..."



  10. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    DFS wrote:
    > Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    >
    >> It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional
    >> (as in altering the meaning of something). The cosmetic use
    >> is just for sentence pace and rhythm.

    >
    > But it does matter. Only a low-standards cola nut like
    > yourself would excuse such a comma-crazy, stuttering sentence:
    > "...leads the user to think the changes should, in fact, work,
    > when, in reality, he hasn't actually changed anything..."
    >
    > Misuse punctuation like that in the work world and your boss
    > will take your email priveleges away.
    >
    > Here's a normal version: "...leads the user to think the
    > changes should work, when in reality he hasn't actually
    > changed anything..."


    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/

    7.6 Trespasser Disinformation Tactics

    26. Attack typos and ignore the content of the message. Point
    out your opponent's grammatical flaws and spelling errors. By
    doing this you can concentrate on form while ignoring substance.
    This is a very handy method to discredit your opponent and by
    extension his position, without once again exposing your
    ignorance of the issues begin discussed in the thread.
    --
    HPT
    Quando omni flunkus moritati
    (If all else fails, play dead)
    - "Red" Green

  11. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    On Sat, 10 May 2008 12:37:16 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:

    > DFS wrote:
    >> Andrew Halliwell wrote:
    >>
    >>> It doesn't matter. The comma can be cosmetic or functional (as in
    >>> altering the meaning of something). The cosmetic use is just for
    >>> sentence pace and rhythm.

    >>
    >> But it does matter. Only a low-standards cola nut like yourself would
    >> excuse such a comma-crazy, stuttering sentence: "...leads the user to
    >> think the changes should, in fact, work, when, in reality, he hasn't
    >> actually changed anything..."
    >>
    >> Misuse punctuation like that in the work world and your boss will take
    >> your email priveleges away.
    >>
    >> Here's a normal version: "...leads the user to think the changes should
    >> work, when in reality he hasn't actually changed anything..."

    >
    > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/
    >
    >
    > 7.6 Trespasser Disinformation Tactics
    >
    > 26. Attack typos and ignore the content of the message. Point out your
    > opponent's grammatical flaws and spelling errors. By doing this you can
    > concentrate on form while ignoring substance. This is a very handy method
    > to discredit your opponent and by extension his position, without once
    > again exposing your ignorance of the issues begin discussed in the thread.
    >


    DFS - spelling troll, apostrophe troll & grammar nazi. Obviously had
    nothing to counter the post, so resorts pointing out opponent's
    grammatical flaws and spelling errors.

    --
    Mandriva 2008.1 64-bit.
    This message was sent from a
    computer which is guaranteed
    100% free of the M$ Windoze virus.

  12. Re: The Case For SCO And The Case For Free Software

    William Poaster wrote:

    > DFS - spelling troll, apostrophe troll & grammar nazi. Obviously had
    > nothing to counter the post, so resorts pointing out opponent's
    > grammatical flaws and spelling errors.


    nazi = Nazi

    And you mean "...resorts to pointing out...". Here you are trying to flame
    me, but you can't write two correct, consecutive sentences? Get with it,
    Dumb Willie.

    And you mean opponents' (apostrophe after the s indicates a plural
    possessive - Rube's and Kelsey's) errors, don't you? Now you know how to
    use an apostrophe; you're welcome.

    Also, I misspelled 'privileges' in my post.

    Still not having read the original post:

    * I think SCO is/was a lowlife operation and I stand with Linux against them
    and it was amusing to see them soundly defeated.

    * I don't believe MS was behind SCO's lawsuits and no OSS weenie making such
    accusations (and there have been a lot) has ever come close to proving it.

    * I think "Free Software/OSS" generally stinks and is a nearly disastrous
    method of developing software.




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