Laptop fingerprint readers and linux - Linux

This is a discussion on Laptop fingerprint readers and linux - Linux ; In article , Homer wrote: > > Biometrics is a flawed concept anyway: > > > Malaysia car thieves steal finger > > Police in Malaysia are hunting for members of a violent gang who chopped > off a car ...

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Thread: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

  1. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    In article , Homer
    wrote:
    >
    > Biometrics is a flawed concept anyway:
    >
    >
    > Malaysia car thieves steal finger
    >
    > Police in Malaysia are hunting for members of a violent gang who chopped
    > off a car owner's finger to get round the vehicle's hi-tech security
    > system.
    >


    See also the Mythbusters episode where they tested various security
    systems, including a couple of fingerprint scanners. One was a cheap
    one, and one was a fancy one, whose manufacturer claimed no one had ever
    defeated it.

    For the fancy one, they took a scan of a fingerprint they lifted off
    something (I think it was a drinking glass), touched the scan up a
    little by hand to make lines more solid, and printed it on an ordinary
    printer on ordinary printer paper.

    That, stuck to Adam's finger, and moistened with a little of his saliva,
    was accepted by the fancy scanner.


    --
    --Tim Smith

  2. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  3. Re: Flatfish says its time has no value.

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  4. Re: Flatfish says its time has no value.

    "Rick" stated in post
    QZ6dnXso95OCFLzVnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@supernews.com on 5/7/08 3:49 AM:

    > On Tue, 06 May 2008 21:38:08 -0700, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Tue, 06 May 2008 20:53:22 -0700
    >> :
    >>> "Rick" stated in post
    >>> QZ6dnXko95PkvbzVnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@supernews.com on 5/6/08 8:22 PM:
    >>>
    >>>> Herd mentality, inertia, network effects, (and your speciality) FUD.
    >>>
    >>> Rick's mantra... now if only he could figure out what he means by it.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I'd say it's pretty obvious.
    >>
    >> [1] Herd mentality, aka "follow the leader". A leading
    >> star/starlet/etc. says use Windows; you follow along.
    >>
    >> [2] Inertia, aka "it's traditional". You've always done it that way
    >> with Windows; why change now?
    >>
    >> [3] Network effects, aka "heard it on the grapevine". Your friends use
    >> Windows; you follow along.
    >>
    >> [4] FUD, aka "the devil you don't know". That other solution might be
    >> bad, evil, and destroy NORAD according to (a leading star/starlet/etc.)
    >> (your friends) (a complete stranger); why take chances?
    >>
    >> Windows. Where did you want to go yesterday?

    >
    > In case you don't know, there are a couple attempts in CSMA to stop,or at
    > lessen greatly lessen, replies to Snit. They are trying to see if that
    > will shut him up. Sadly, it isn't working. There are some people that
    > seem compelled to reply to him. Snit just keeps posting his dishonest
    > tripe, while showing his extreme ignorance.
    >
    > Ah, well.


    You pretend on one hand to not want me to post... then you spew lies about
    me in a clear sign of begging for my attention.

    You are very confused as to what you want.


    --
    God made me an atheist - who are you to question his authority?




  5. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    On 2008-05-07, Tim Smith wrote:
    > In article , Homer
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> Biometrics is a flawed concept anyway:
    >>
    >>
    >> Malaysia car thieves steal finger
    >>
    >> Police in Malaysia are hunting for members of a violent gang who chopped
    >> off a car owner's finger to get round the vehicle's hi-tech security
    >> system.
    >>

    >
    > See also the Mythbusters episode where they tested various security
    > systems, including a couple of fingerprint scanners. One was a cheap
    > one, and one was a fancy one, whose manufacturer claimed no one had ever
    > defeated it.
    >
    > For the fancy one, they took a scan of a fingerprint they lifted off
    > something (I think it was a drinking glass), touched the scan up a
    > little by hand to make lines more solid, and printed it on an ordinary
    > printer on ordinary printer paper.
    >
    > That, stuck to Adam's finger, and moistened with a little of his saliva,
    > was accepted by the fancy scanner.
    >
    >


    While, it's not really useful as a security device - it is nice as a
    convience feature. I have a Microsoft keyboard with a finger print
    reader - and it really makes logging in, fast user switching, and
    password management much easier

    --
    Tom Shelton

  6. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    > "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    > news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just 'swipe'
    >>> your
    >>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>

    >>
    >> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!

    >
    > What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't care about


    Not quite...

    "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need obscure
    hardware.

    Don't you have any wifi chipsets you can whine about? At least
    someone I know, or someone I have worked for (throughout my entire
    life) might actually want to use a wifi device.

    [deletia]

    --
    Sure, I could use iTunes even under Linux. However, I have |||
    better things to do with my time than deal with how iTunes doesn't / | \
    want to play nicely with everyone else's data (namely mine). I'd
    rather create a DVD using those Linux apps we're told don't exist.

    Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
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  7. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux


    "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    news:slrng23p6l.vhi.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    > On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >> "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    >> news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >>> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just 'swipe'
    >>>> your
    >>>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!

    >>
    >> What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't care
    >> about

    >
    > Not quite...
    >
    > "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need obscure
    > hardware.


    Only an idiot would call something that's pretty much standard equipment on
    most high-end laptops "obscure."

    When somebody buys a laptop and this is a very noticable and predominant
    feature right in front of their face do explain to the buyer how linux
    doesn't support this piece of hardware because it's "obscure."


    > Don't you have any wifi chipsets you can whine about? At least
    > someone I know, or someone I have worked for (throughout my entire
    > life) might actually want to use a wifi device.


    Perhaps you also came to the conclusion that built-in wireless in laptops is
    also "obscure" hardware.



    > [deletia]
    >
    > --
    > Sure, I could use iTunes even under Linux. However, I have |||
    > better things to do with my time than deal with how iTunes doesn't /
    > | \
    > want to play nicely with everyone else's data (namely mine). I'd
    > rather create a DVD using those Linux apps we're told don't exist.
    >
    > Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > http://www.usenet.com



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  8. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    > "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    > news:slrng23p6l.vhi.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    >>> news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >>>> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just 'swipe'
    >>>>> your
    >>>>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!
    >>>
    >>> What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't care
    >>> about

    >>
    >> Not quite...
    >>
    >> "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need obscure
    >> hardware.

    >
    > Only an idiot would call something that's pretty much standard equipment on
    > most high-end laptops "obscure."


    My last 3 work laptops didn't have one.

    >
    > When somebody buys a laptop and this is a very noticable and predominant
    > feature right in front of their face do explain to the buyer how linux
    > doesn't support this piece of hardware because it's "obscure."


    So you personally use these things?

    >
    >
    >> Don't you have any wifi chipsets you can whine about? At least
    >> someone I know, or someone I have worked for (throughout my entire
    >> life) might actually want to use a wifi device.

    >
    > Perhaps you also came to the conclusion that built-in wireless in laptops is
    > also "obscure" hardware.


    Well, you're an obvious lame-brain so I could see how you could come
    up with that. I wouldn't expect anyone else to be that stupid (not even
    your own fellow Lemmings).

    [deletia]

    --

    The social cost of suing/prosecuting individuals |||
    for non-commercial copyright infringement far outweighs / | \
    the social value of copyright to begin with.



    Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
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  9. Re: Flatfish says its time has no value.

    "Rick" stated in post
    Z4mdncY3i-kVc7zVnZ2dnUVZ_h7inZ2d@supernews.com on 5/6/08 10:58 PM:

    > Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >> On Tue, 06 May 2008 20:53:22 -0700, Snit wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Rick" stated in post
    >>> QZ6dnXko95PkvbzVnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@supernews.com on 5/6/08 8:22 PM:
    >>>
    >>>> Herd mentality, inertia, network effects, (and your speciality) FUD.
    >>> Rick's mantra... now if only he could figure out what he means by it.

    >>
    >> Rick's going off the deep end.
    >> He still hasn't explained how herd mentality hasn't seemed to effect
    >> firefox.
    >>

    > Yes, I did. It was in several posts to Snit.


    Not that I recall... by all means point to the posts!


    --
    I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is to try to please
    everyone. -- Bill Cosby


  10. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux


    "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    news:slrng23rg2.bst.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    > On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >> "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    >> news:slrng23p6l.vhi.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >>> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    >>>> news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >>>>> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just 'swipe'
    >>>>>> your
    >>>>>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!
    >>>>
    >>>> What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't care
    >>>> about
    >>>
    >>> Not quite...
    >>>
    >>> "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need obscure
    >>> hardware.

    >>
    >> Only an idiot would call something that's pretty much standard equipment
    >> on
    >> most high-end laptops "obscure."

    >
    > My last 3 work laptops didn't have one.


    I could care less about your last 3 laptops. The fact is that nearly all
    mid-range to high-end laptops made today have a fingerprint reader. That's
    not an opinion... that's a fact.

    * According to the most recent stats, the #1 most popular notebook/laptop
    in the country is the Dell XPS M1530. Guess what... it has a fingerprint
    reader.
    * What's the #2 most popular notebook/laptop in the country... the Lenovo
    Thinkpad T61 and it ALSO has a fingerprint reader.

    Only an idiot would think that something that is visibly located on the
    working surface of the top selling laptops is "obscure."



    >> When somebody buys a laptop and this is a very noticable and predominant
    >> feature right in front of their face do explain to the buyer how linux
    >> doesn't support this piece of hardware because it's "obscure."

    >
    > So you personally use these things?
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>> Don't you have any wifi chipsets you can whine about? At least
    >>> someone I know, or someone I have worked for (throughout my entire
    >>> life) might actually want to use a wifi device.

    >>
    >> Perhaps you also came to the conclusion that built-in wireless in laptops
    >> is
    >> also "obscure" hardware.

    >
    > Well, you're an obvious lame-brain so I could see how you could come
    > up with that. I wouldn't expect anyone else to be that stupid (not even
    > your own fellow Lemmings).


    According to your flawed logic... any hardware that doesn't work in linux is
    "obscure" and people don't need it.


    > [deletia]
    >
    > --
    >
    > The social cost of suing/prosecuting individuals |||
    > for non-commercial copyright infringement far outweighs / | \
    > the social value of copyright to begin with.
    >
    >
    >
    > Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > http://www.usenet.com



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  11. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux

    On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >
    > "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    > news:slrng23rg2.bst.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    >>> news:slrng23p6l.vhi.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >>>> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    >>>>> news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >>>>>> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just 'swipe'
    >>>>>>> your
    >>>>>>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't care
    >>>>> about
    >>>>
    >>>> Not quite...
    >>>>
    >>>> "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need obscure
    >>>> hardware.
    >>>
    >>> Only an idiot would call something that's pretty much standard equipment
    >>> on
    >>> most high-end laptops "obscure."

    >>
    >> My last 3 work laptops didn't have one.

    >
    > I could care less about your last 3 laptops. The fact is that nearly all
    > mid-range to high-end laptops made today have a fingerprint reader. That's
    > not an opinion... that's a fact.


    I guess that means I need to send the latest one back...

    Mebbe let it grow some more (like an undersized fish)

    >
    > * According to the most recent stats, the #1 most popular notebook/laptop
    > in the country is the Dell XPS M1530. Guess what... it has a fingerprint
    > reader.


    XPS eh? That's a GAMERS laptop.

    Wonder why gamers care about biometrics.

    > * What's the #2 most popular notebook/laptop in the country... the Lenovo
    > Thinkpad T61 and it ALSO has a fingerprint reader.


    Where?

    >
    > Only an idiot would think that something that is visibly located on the
    > working surface of the top selling laptops is "obscure."
    >
    >
    >
    >>> When somebody buys a laptop and this is a very noticable and predominant
    >>> feature right in front of their face do explain to the buyer how linux
    >>> doesn't support this piece of hardware because it's "obscure."

    >>
    >> So you personally use these things?


    ....deafening silence.

    [deletia]

    It bears noting that USB was standard for a long time before
    anyone decided to make use of it.

    --

    iTunes is not progressive. It's a throwback. |||
    / | \

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  12. Re: Laptop fingerprint readers and linux


    "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    news:slrng249lv.a8k.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    > On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>
    >> "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    >> news:slrng23rg2.bst.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >>> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "JEDIDIAH" wrote in message
    >>>> news:slrng23p6l.vhi.jedi@nomad.mishnet...
    >>>>> On 2008-05-07, Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Ian Hilliard" wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:1210129929.413857@angel.amnet.net.au...
    >>>>>>> Ezekiel wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Many new laptops have a fingerprint reader where you can just
    >>>>>>>> 'swipe'
    >>>>>>>> your
    >>>>>>>> finger of the pad and presto... you're logged in.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> So what you're saying is that preinstalled is easier. Well duh!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> What I'm saying is "hardware that works" is easier. People don't
    >>>>>> care
    >>>>>> about
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Not quite...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "obscure hardware that works" is easier for people that need
    >>>>> obscure
    >>>>> hardware.
    >>>>
    >>>> Only an idiot would call something that's pretty much standard
    >>>> equipment
    >>>> on
    >>>> most high-end laptops "obscure."
    >>>
    >>> My last 3 work laptops didn't have one.

    >>
    >> I could care less about your last 3 laptops. The fact is that nearly all
    >> mid-range to high-end laptops made today have a fingerprint reader.
    >> That's
    >> not an opinion... that's a fact.

    >
    > I guess that means I need to send the latest one back...
    >
    > Mebbe let it grow some more (like an undersized fish)


    Do whatever you want with it.


    >>
    >> * According to the most recent stats, the #1 most popular
    >> notebook/laptop
    >> in the country is the Dell XPS M1530. Guess what... it has a fingerprint
    >> reader.

    >
    > XPS eh? That's a GAMERS laptop.


    It's powerful enough for gaming.. that doesn't mean that power users can't
    use it for other things.

    > Wonder why gamers care about biometrics.


    The same reason anyone else cares. It's the fastest and easiest way to
    login to the system.


    >> * What's the #2 most popular notebook/laptop in the country... the
    >> Lenovo
    >> Thinkpad T61 and it ALSO has a fingerprint reader.

    >
    > Where?


    Not too bright, eh? There's this thing called the internet. If you go to
    the Lenovo website they have the info.

    http://shop.lenovo.com/SEUILibrary/c...ab-container-5


    Notice how Lenovo says "#2 ranked most popular laptop" in the add. Either
    read the specs or look at the photo. It's in the "standard location" which
    is on the right side below the keyboard.


    T Series models come equipped with an Integrated Fingerprint Reader and
    32-byte pre-boot password protection to help guard against external
    threats.??



    >>
    >> Only an idiot would think that something that is visibly located on the
    >> working surface of the top selling laptops is "obscure."
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>> When somebody buys a laptop and this is a very noticable and
    >>>> predominant
    >>>> feature right in front of their face do explain to the buyer how linux
    >>>> doesn't support this piece of hardware because it's "obscure."
    >>>
    >>> So you personally use these things?

    >
    > ...deafening silence.
    >
    > [deletia]
    >
    > It bears noting that USB was standard for a long time before
    > anyone decided to make use of it.
    >
    > --
    >
    > iTunes is not progressive. It's a throwback. |||
    > / | \
    >
    > Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > http://www.usenet.com



    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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