How valuable is a computer? - Linux

This is a discussion on How valuable is a computer? - Linux ; JEDIDIAH wrote: > On 2008-05-07, Hadron wrote: >> "Ezekiel" writes: >> >>> "alt" wrote in message >>> news an.2008.05.07.21.07.57@lazyeyez.net... >>>> On Wed, 07 May 2008 13:00:17 +0100, William Poaster wrote: >>>> >>>>>>>> Anyhow. I'll be installing Linux on these boxes ...

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Thread: How valuable is a computer?

  1. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    JEDIDIAH wrote:
    > On 2008-05-07, Hadron wrote:
    >> "Ezekiel" writes:
    >>
    >>> "alt" wrote in message
    >>> newsan.2008.05.07.21.07.57@lazyeyez.net...
    >>>> On Wed, 07 May 2008 13:00:17 +0100, William Poaster wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>> Anyhow. I'll be installing Linux on these boxes to give them a second
    >>>>>>>> life.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Four machines saved from Windows.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Did I ever tell you you're my hero?
    >>>>>>>

    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> ha ha. way to make a sick man laugh (chest cold/flu... not sure which,
    >>>>>> but I feel like death).
    >>>>> Nasty. I hope you're soon feeling better. :-)
    >>>> Not really. this is the 2nd day I've left the office early. Today I left
    >>>> about 11am. I was feeling really rough (and still am). I figure I'll be
    >>>> good by the weekend.
    >>> You probably got some nasty disease while dumpster-diving for your
    >>> computers.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

    >> The average keyboard has more germs than the average public toilet
    >> apparently.

    >
    > Toilets tend to get cleaned regularly.
    >
    > Dunno what would happen to my keyboard if I sprayed scrubbing
    > bubbles on it. Not sure I want to find out...



    Probably you can take the top and bottom shells including the keys apart
    from the innards and soak them in the bathtub. Lather, rinse repeat.
    Dry and reassemble.

  2. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    Hadron wrote:
    > Matt writes:


    >> Suppose a new machine uses 50W less than a reused one, although I
    >> seriously doubt that the difference is that large.
    >>

    >
    > What part of "accumulation" is difficult for you to understand? He is
    > going to plug in 4 "old" machines. Why?
    >



    He never said he was going to run all those machines at once. He never
    even said he was going to keep them for himself. He mentions elsewhere
    on the thread a charity that collects and distributes reusable
    computers. That indicates he isn't going to keep them and run them all
    at once as you assume.


    >> A typical cost for power in the US is ten cents per kilowatt-hour:
    >> http://www.ppinys.org/reports/jtf/electricprices.html

    >
    > Cost is NOT the issue as even you should be aware of.
    >
    > I can poor oil into a fish pond and the cost is minimal. The resulting
    > carnage is another thing altogether.
    >
    >> So you would pay twelve cents more per day if you ran the reused
    >> machine continually. That comes to $43.80 per year if you run the
    >> computer 24/7. It comes to $3.65 per year if you run it two hours per
    >> day.



    One is supposed to be able to reason that if the change in energy cost
    is $3.65 per year, the increase in energy usage is environmentally
    insignificant.

  3. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    On Wed, 07 May 2008 17:05:12 -0500, JEDIDIAH wrote:


    > Toilets tend to get cleaned regularly.
    >
    > Dunno what would happen to my keyboard if I sprayed scrubbing
    > bubbles on it. Not sure I want to find out...


    Wipe it down with a cloth soaked in 99% Pure Isopropyl Alcohol. That'll
    kill 99.999% of the germs. Careful, Isopropyl Alcohol is _very_ flammable.


  4. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Matt

    wrote
    on Thu, 08 May 2008 01:28:15 GMT
    :
    > The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Hadron
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Thu, 08 May 2008 00:39:01 +0200
    >> :
    >>> JEDIDIAH writes:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2008-05-07, Hadron wrote:
    >>>>> Andrew Halliwell writes:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Hadron wrote:
    >>>>>>> headless machines can also support X you blithering idiot
    >>>>>> Awwww
    >>>>>> Isn't it sweet?
    >>>>>> Hadron can't read either.
    >>>>>> WE'RE TALKING ABOUT HEADLESS CLUSTER NODES!
    >>>>>> You don't NEED or even WANT any form of GUI in one of those.
    >>>>>> Now who's the blithering idiot?
    >>>>> Poor Degree Boy. Now he's telling people what they want and need! This
    >>>>> degree you earned show made you omnipotent!
    >>>> ...well.
    >>>>
    >>>> You can WASTE your network bandwidth on pushing pictures around
    >>>> or you can get ACTUAL REAL WORK DONE. It doesn't take a rocket
    >>> For goodness sake - if its an admin task and you bother to use
    >>> x-forwarding for a few minutes its not going to kill the system you
    >>> know.
    >>>
    >>> Sheesh.

    >>
    >> Such would require installation of the X libraries on
    >> the system, as well as the requisite GUI control system.
    >> A minor matter, easily done if privileges permit.

    >
    >
    > So maybe there isn't much computational or bandwidth cost in having GUI
    > access to each headless node. But since the several nodes are
    > equivalent, or (at least) there is some regular structure among the
    > nodes, are you going to want to connect to each node individually to
    > carry out the same or similar task on each one? No, you would want to
    > send some kind of script or sequence of commands to each one. So you
    > don't _need_ GUI access to the individual nodes.
    >


    An interesting subpoint, and I agree. I'd want both,
    though, if possible.

    Admittedly, I'm a bit spoiled. Mentor Graphics had
    an excellent combination of text and graphics prior
    to 8.0 (and 8.0 wasn't that bad, but went a little too
    goo-ey); the general idea was that one would do something
    graphically and the transcript would capture the equivalent
    scripting. One could also type in part of a command and
    "expand" it with a keystroke, allowing one to see all of
    its options and set them in a reasonably intuitive fashion.

    Once the script is developed, of course, one can simply
    execute it. Might simply therefore be better to present
    a text editor, a set of documentation for each script
    command and option (hmm...man pages?), and maybe a method
    by which one can do a dry run of the script, or at least
    set up something where the script can do no damage to a
    production system (hmm....QA backup copies).

    There's also the issue that I can type in the following command:

    "find . -type f -mtime +7 | cpio -oc -o archive.cpio"

    a lot faster than clicking and dragging entries from an
    Explorer-type window to an archiving program. (To be
    sure, I'm cheating a bit here; cpio takes its file list
    from standard input -- but that's one of the more useful
    things to know when making archives. Granted, spaces in
    the filenames make life annoying.)

    >
    >>>> scientist or a gypsy to figure out which one of these options
    >>>> that pragmatic business minded types would prefer.
    >>>>
    >>>> ...although keep in mind that many cluster architectures call
    >>>> for a dedicated interconnect network to begin with. So you
    >>>> won't necessarily bog down the cluster by engaging in
    >>>> unnecessary UI bloat.
    >>> Make up your mind :-;

    >



    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    New Technology? Not There. No Thanks.
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    Matt writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> Matt writes:

    >
    >>> Suppose a new machine uses 50W less than a reused one, although I
    >>> seriously doubt that the difference is that large.
    >>>

    >>
    >> What part of "accumulation" is difficult for you to understand? He is
    >> going to plug in 4 "old" machines. Why?
    >>

    >
    >
    > He never said he was going to run all those machines at once. He
    > never even said he was going to keep them for himself. He mentions
    > elsewhere on the thread a charity that collects and distributes
    > reusable computers. That indicates he isn't going to keep them and
    > run them all at once as you assume.


    In that case fine - but there is a trend here to waffle on about running
    "8 rigs" hidden away in basements and what have you with uptimes of 99
    years etc all doing little things.

    These old machines are far better off being recycled IMO.

    >
    >
    >>> A typical cost for power in the US is ten cents per kilowatt-hour:
    >>> http://www.ppinys.org/reports/jtf/electricprices.html

    >>
    >> Cost is NOT the issue as even you should be aware of.
    >>
    >> I can poor oil into a fish pond and the cost is minimal. The resulting
    >> carnage is another thing altogether.
    >>
    >>> So you would pay twelve cents more per day if you ran the reused
    >>> machine continually. That comes to $43.80 per year if you run the
    >>> computer 24/7. It comes to $3.65 per year if you run it two hours per
    >>> day.

    >
    > One is supposed to be able to reason that if the change in energy cost
    > is $3.65 per year, the increase in energy usage is environmentally
    > insignificant.


    Every bit helps. As you well know. The best way to become a millionaire
    is to borrow a penny off ever man in China. That kind of thing.

    --
    If you are going to run a rinky-dink distro made by a couple of
    volunteers, why not run a rinky-dink distro made by a lot of volunteers?
    -- Jaldhar H. Vyas on debian-devel

  6. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    Hadron wrote:

    > Not at all. As usual you idiots snip to support your points. I said
    > specifically what is his existing set up doing. I then went on to
    > ADVOCATE Linux by saying my Piv could do all that and more on ONE
    > existing machine.


    The only thing you advocate is having Moshe's and DFS's noses up your ass.
    Preferably both at the same time.
    --
    Regards,
    [tv]

    Owner/Proprietor, Trollus Amongus, LLC

    The judge fined the jaywalker fifty dollars and told him if he was
    caught again, he would be thrown in jail. Fine today, cooler tomorrow.


  7. Re: How valuable is a computer?

    On Wed, 07 May 2008 11:54:03 +0000, Matt wrote:

    > alt wrote:


    > Hey, there are many people for whom a 3 GHz HT P4 will be more than
    > adequate for a few more years.


    I'm just starting to feel the "pain" of a single core CPU. Google Earth
    runs slow on my 3GHz P4 Laptop. Everything else runs fine.

    On a serious note, my system with the NTSC Tuner Card and DVB-S card
    performs much better with that fancy new HT CPU ;-)

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