Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working" - Linux

This is a discussion on Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working" - Linux ; http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=207200145 Unfortunately, openSUSE didn't work very well out of the box with either of the notebook computers. Display brightness controls on both machines didn't work properly, and for some reason the graphics detection routines couldn't pick up the native resolution ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

  1. Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"


    http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=207200145



    Unfortunately, openSUSE didn't work very well out of the box with either of
    the notebook computers. Display brightness controls on both machines didn't
    work properly, and for some reason the graphics detection routines couldn't
    pick up the native resolution of either machine's display. Both machines
    also didn't suspend and resume reliably, but they did come up from
    hibernation without problems. I also had trouble getting openSUSE to install
    on the Dell (Dell) XPS, a problem due to the way grub chose to address the
    boot drive.

    I tried out the closed-source binary-only nVidia drivers on the Thinkpad,
    too, and while they worked fine, there were other persistent issues (like
    the suspend/resume problem) that weren't addressed.

    Power management in PCLinuxOS is a little shaky, though. It didn't work
    completely out-of-the-box in any of my test systems, and the instructions to
    get sleep and suspend working correctly were useless, since they didn't
    correspond to any obvious sequence of actions. Also, the online
    documentation for the distribution itself (as opposed to docs for, say, KDE)
    is rather spotty.

    With the VAIO, I had trouble getting X to detect the proper display size
    until I used the generic VESA driver (after which it worked perfectly).
    Another letdown on the VAIO was that the SD card slot didn't seem to work
    out of the box, although its suspend/resume functions did work. The
    Thinkpad's graphics worked fine, but it would only hibernate and not suspend
    to RAM. Sadly, the Dell (Dell) refused to even boot the Mandriva
    installation CD properly, no matter what kernel parameters I passed.

    The Thinkpad wasn't as smooth sailing. I couldn't even get the Fedora live
    CD to boot without passing some special boot parameters and doing a good
    deal of post-install hacking. Apparently this is due to the nVidia graphics
    card on the T61, which needs a proprietary driver from a separate repository
    to work correctly. I suspect suspend didn't work on the Thinkpad for the
    same reason; only hibernate was available, but it worked fine.

    Getting wireless networking going required a bit of digging -- I had to run
    the MEPIS Network Assistant and then set up the KNetworkManager, but once
    done, it worked without a hitch. While the SD card reader worked perfectly,
    suspend to RAM or disk didn't work on the VAIO by default. I got it working,
    though, thanks to a hint from a pop-up that appeared when suspend failed.
    The Thinkpad suspended to disk fine, but didn't suspend to memory until I
    added nVidia-specific drivers; the desktop machine suffered the same fate.

    The VAIO's widescreen display came up properly right out of the box, but its
    wireless card (an Intel (NSDQ: INTC) 2200BG) wasn't recognized. The
    Thinkpad, too, had trouble booting, probably due to its display hardware.
    Consequently, you may want to try the live CD of CentOS to determine what
    kind of hoops you'll have to jump through to get everything working.






    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  2. Re: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

    On Mon, 5 May 2008 11:21:29 -0400, Ezekiel wrote:

    > http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=207200145
    >
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, openSUSE didn't work very well out of the box with either of
    > the notebook computers. Display brightness controls on both machines didn't
    > work properly, and for some reason the graphics detection routines couldn't
    > pick up the native resolution of either machine's display. Both machines
    > also didn't suspend and resume reliably, but they did come up from
    > hibernation without problems. I also had trouble getting openSUSE to install
    > on the Dell (Dell) XPS, a problem due to the way grub chose to address the
    > boot drive.
    >
    > I tried out the closed-source binary-only nVidia drivers on the Thinkpad,
    > too, and while they worked fine, there were other persistent issues (like
    > the suspend/resume problem) that weren't addressed.
    >
    > Power management in PCLinuxOS is a little shaky, though. It didn't work
    > completely out-of-the-box in any of my test systems, and the instructions to
    > get sleep and suspend working correctly were useless, since they didn't
    > correspond to any obvious sequence of actions. Also, the online
    > documentation for the distribution itself (as opposed to docs for, say, KDE)
    > is rather spotty.
    >
    > With the VAIO, I had trouble getting X to detect the proper display size
    > until I used the generic VESA driver (after which it worked perfectly).
    > Another letdown on the VAIO was that the SD card slot didn't seem to work
    > out of the box, although its suspend/resume functions did work. The
    > Thinkpad's graphics worked fine, but it would only hibernate and not suspend
    > to RAM. Sadly, the Dell (Dell) refused to even boot the Mandriva
    > installation CD properly, no matter what kernel parameters I passed.
    >
    > The Thinkpad wasn't as smooth sailing. I couldn't even get the Fedora live
    > CD to boot without passing some special boot parameters and doing a good
    > deal of post-install hacking. Apparently this is due to the nVidia graphics
    > card on the T61, which needs a proprietary driver from a separate repository
    > to work correctly. I suspect suspend didn't work on the Thinkpad for the
    > same reason; only hibernate was available, but it worked fine.
    >
    > Getting wireless networking going required a bit of digging -- I had to run
    > the MEPIS Network Assistant and then set up the KNetworkManager, but once
    > done, it worked without a hitch. While the SD card reader worked perfectly,
    > suspend to RAM or disk didn't work on the VAIO by default. I got it working,
    > though, thanks to a hint from a pop-up that appeared when suspend failed.
    > The Thinkpad suspended to disk fine, but didn't suspend to memory until I
    > added nVidia-specific drivers; the desktop machine suffered the same fate.
    >
    > The VAIO's widescreen display came up properly right out of the box, but its
    > wireless card (an Intel (NSDQ: INTC) 2200BG) wasn't recognized. The
    > Thinkpad, too, had trouble booting, probably due to its display hardware.
    > Consequently, you may want to try the live CD of CentOS to determine what
    > kind of hoops you'll have to jump through to get everything working.
    >
    >
    >


    /Sarcasm on

    That's impossible??
    According to the Linux 'advocates' in comp.os.linux.advocacy, Linux just
    works.

    So why should we believe an 'unknown' publication like Information Week,
    when we have all of this first hand information from the Linux advocates in
    COLA?

    /Sarcasm off

    The truth is that even after 10+ years, Linux is still a confused mess that
    is simply ignored by desktop users because it just does not work very well.

    The average user wouldn't stand a chance getting any of the above to work.
    They would become frustrated and toss the Linux CD in the trash can which
    is probably why Linux is still sitting a 0.6 percent of the desktop market
    even after 10 years.

    If you Linux loons really want Linux to get someplace on the desktop you
    have to settle on one distribution, make it solid, get some financial
    backing and professional support and get working.

    Currently you are doing the worst possible thing and that is creating one
    defective distribution after another. These distributions often fix
    problems that other distributions may have but generally they create
    additional problems of their own and the cycle continues.



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  4. Re: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

    "Ezekiel" writes:

    > http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=207200145
    >
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, openSUSE didn't work very well out of the box with either of
    > the notebook computers. Display brightness controls on both machines didn't
    > work properly, and for some reason the graphics detection routines couldn't
    > pick up the native resolution of either machine's display. Both machines
    > also didn't suspend and resume reliably, but they did come up from
    > hibernation without problems. I also had trouble getting openSUSE to install
    > on the Dell (Dell) XPS, a problem due to the way grub chose to address the
    > boot drive.
    >
    > I tried out the closed-source binary-only nVidia drivers on the Thinkpad,
    > too, and while they worked fine, there were other persistent issues (like
    > the suspend/resume problem) that weren't addressed.
    >
    > Power management in PCLinuxOS is a little shaky, though. It didn't
    > work


    A recurring theme. When I pointed out the kernel developers realise a
    complete redesign is necessary I was called a liar and the usual crowd
    claimed it "worked for them". Sigh.

  5. Re: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

    On Tue, 06 May 2008 14:03:08 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > "Ezekiel" writes:
    >
    >> http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=207200145
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, openSUSE didn't work very well out of the box with either of
    >> the notebook computers. Display brightness controls on both machines didn't
    >> work properly, and for some reason the graphics detection routines couldn't
    >> pick up the native resolution of either machine's display. Both machines
    >> also didn't suspend and resume reliably, but they did come up from
    >> hibernation without problems. I also had trouble getting openSUSE to install
    >> on the Dell (Dell) XPS, a problem due to the way grub chose to address the
    >> boot drive.
    >>
    >> I tried out the closed-source binary-only nVidia drivers on the Thinkpad,
    >> too, and while they worked fine, there were other persistent issues (like
    >> the suspend/resume problem) that weren't addressed.
    >>
    >> Power management in PCLinuxOS is a little shaky, though. It didn't
    >> work

    >
    > A recurring theme. When I pointed out the kernel developers realise a
    > complete redesign is necessary I was called a liar and the usual crowd
    > claimed it "worked for them". Sigh.


    Of course they did.
    They have no other choice.

    In the Linux cult, rule #1 is NEVER admit Linux's faults.

    Always emphasize Windows faults and when confronted with questions
    concerning possible Linux faults, quickly change the topic to Windows.

    For some of these people saying something bad about Linux is like denying
    their birth mother or something.

    It's very, very strange behavior but typical of a cult like organization.



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  6. Re: Information week tests 7 distros. "You'll have to jump through hoops to get everything working"

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (in real life Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

+ Reply to Thread