How do i do this in Windows III - Linux

This is a discussion on How do i do this in Windows III - Linux ; windows ust be broken. In GNU/Linux I can run any program anywhere I just type ssh -X -l ruben flatbush.mrbrklyn.com log in and then run my program pan and it just then pops up to use, GUI and everything. Why ...

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Thread: How do i do this in Windows III

  1. How do i do this in Windows III

    windows ust be broken. In GNU/Linux I can run any program anywhere

    I just type

    ssh -X -l ruben flatbush.mrbrklyn.com
    log in

    and then run my program

    pan

    and it just then pops up to use, GUI and everything. Why does Windows
    not do this? It must be broken.

    Ruben

  2. Re: How do i do this in Windows III

    mrbrklyn wrote:

    > windows ust be broken. In GNU/Linux I can run any program anywhere
    >
    > I just type
    >
    > ssh -X -l ruben flatbush.mrbrklyn.com
    > log in
    >
    > and then run my program
    >
    > pan
    >
    > and it just then pops up to use, GUI and everything. Why does Windows
    > not do this? It must be broken.
    >
    > Ruben


    Just to rewrite it slightly...

    ssh -X -l username ipaddress
    log in

    and then run programs available on remote pc with the ipaddress given above
    e.g. gedit, kwrite etc...


    I can't tell you how much that command means to me now!!!
    You can do this with the secure 128 bit encryption
    of ssh over the internet with your home machine - and access all the
    local files, cut and paste!!!

    Its absolutely awesome man!

    I opened up office in the remote machine

    > ooffice -write


    And hey presto office is running on my local machine - very fast - because
    most of the work is done in the remote machine. (The local would have
    been very slow if it had to do it.)
    And then opened up remote document in open office
    and cut and paste to a locally
    running open office. The remote was running open office 2.3,
    while the local one was running Open Office 1.1 and it still
    cut and paste!

    Then I ran virtual box

    > VirtualBox


    And hey presto, my virtual box machines were all available to run
    there and then. Some of these virtual machines have taken hours
    to set up with exotic software and I had contemplated just moving
    them around with 16Gb flash, but now I can just run remotely
    (providing I have a net connection) which is perfect!


    Thank you Mr. Ruben, you have done wonders today by revisiting this
    command!!!




  3. Re: How do i do this in Windows III


    "7" wrote in message
    news:OVnTj.19758$yD2.47@text.news.virginmedia.com. ..
    > mrbrklyn wrote:
    >
    >> windows ust be broken. In GNU/Linux I can run any program anywhere
    >>
    >> I just type
    >>
    >> ssh -X -l ruben flatbush.mrbrklyn.com
    >> log in
    >>
    >> and then run my program
    >>
    >> pan
    >>
    >> and it just then pops up to use, GUI and everything. Why does Windows
    >> not do this? It must be broken.
    >>
    >> Ruben

    >
    > Just to rewrite it slightly...
    >
    > ssh -X -l username ipaddress
    > log in


    Useless for most people. Average people don't want to go to the
    command-line and type in strange commands. "What's an IP address" is what
    most people will be asking.

    Windows has remote desktop. You can use any other Windows machine (or even
    a linux machine) to connect remotely without needing to do this complicated
    command line stuff.


    > and then run programs available on remote pc with the ipaddress given
    > above
    > e.g. gedit, kwrite etc...


    What if people don't know the name of the program? Regular people start
    apps from the menu or by clicking on icons. How are normal people supposed
    to know what the filename of their app is and why do they need to start it
    from the command line?

    Windows Remote Desktop is better because it shows users the exact same
    desktop and menu that they would normally see on their computer.


    > I can't tell you how much that command means to me now!!!
    > You can do this with the secure 128 bit encryption
    > of ssh over the internet with your home machine - and access all the
    > local files, cut and paste!!!


    So it's just like remote desktop. Except that it's worse because users get
    some funky "command line (CLI)" that they're not used to and they have to
    memorize the filenames of the applications they want to run.


    > Its absolutely awesome man!


    By 1986 standards it probably is.


    > I opened up office in the remote machine
    >
    >> ooffice -write


    So you had to memorize the names of the apps you want to run so that you
    can start them from the command line. Normal people will not be able to, or
    want to do this. They would rather click and run apps with the mouse the
    way they normally do. Normal people prefer to do this the Windows way.


    > And hey presto office is running on my local machine - very fast -
    > because
    > most of the work is done in the remote machine. (The local would have
    > been very slow if it had to do it.)


    Just like Remote Desktop on Windows. The application runs on the "remote
    machine" with the display on the local machine. Except that Windows makes
    it possible for normal people to do this and with linux you need to be a
    command line expert and have to memorize the filenames of your programs.


    > And then opened up remote document in open office
    > and cut and paste to a locally


    Copy and paste over the network. Big deal. Windows has been doing this for
    years.

    > running open office. The remote was running open office 2.3,
    > while the local one was running Open Office 1.1 and it still
    > cut and paste!


    You're so excited about copy-and-paste. Is it because you can do this one
    thing without having to go to the command line?

    > Then I ran virtual box
    >
    >> VirtualBox


    VMWare is much better.


    > And hey presto, my virtual box machines were all available to run
    > there and then. Some of these virtual machines have taken hours
    > to set up with exotic software and I had contemplated just moving
    > them around with 16Gb flash, but now I can just run remotely
    > (providing I have a net connection) which is perfect!
    >
    >
    > Thank you Mr. Ruben, you have done wonders today by revisiting this
    > command!!!


    Yes. The tart reminded everyone why Windows is much better than linux.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  4. Re: How do i do this in Windows III

    7 writes:

    > mrbrklyn wrote:
    >
    >> windows ust be broken. In GNU/Linux I can run any program anywhere
    >>
    >> I just type
    >>
    >> ssh -X -l ruben flatbush.mrbrklyn.com
    >> log in
    >>
    >> and then run my program
    >>
    >> pan
    >>
    >> and it just then pops up to use, GUI and everything. Why does Windows
    >> not do this? It must be broken.
    >>
    >> Ruben

    >
    > Just to rewrite it slightly...
    >
    > ssh -X -l username ipaddress
    > log in
    >
    > and then run programs available on remote pc with the ipaddress given above
    > e.g. gedit, kwrite etc...


    Dont be so ridiculous. Just use default x forwarding by modifying the
    server config file.

    In addition, set up public key authorization and you dont even need to
    login.

    You COLA nuts know nothing. It's all a big thrill to get something on
    the command line to work for you little amateurs isn't it?

  5. Re: How do i do this in Windows III

    Micoshaft fraudster Ezekiel wrote on behalf of half wits from Micoshaft
    Corporation:


    >> Just to rewrite it slightly...
    >>
    >> ssh -X -l username ipaddress
    >> log in



    > So it's just like remote desktop.



    You poor WINDUMMY thing you.
    Thats exactly what its not.

    WINDUMMIES ARE NOT EDUCATED ON LINUX AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

    Does that apply to you?


  6. Re: How do i do this in Windows III

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, 7

    wrote
    on Sun, 04 May 2008 21:01:30 GMT
    :
    > Micoshaft fraudster Ezekiel wrote on behalf of half wits from Micoshaft
    > Corporation:
    >
    >
    >>> Just to rewrite it slightly...
    >>>
    >>> ssh -X -l username ipaddress
    >>> log in

    >
    >
    >> So it's just like remote desktop.

    >
    >
    > You poor WINDUMMY thing you.
    > Thats exactly what its not.
    >
    > WINDUMMIES ARE NOT EDUCATED ON LINUX AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
    >
    > Does that apply to you?
    >


    So I'll fix that. ;-)

    I should point out that remote desktop is just that...it
    fires up a remote desktop, and displays it on the local
    screen. Linux has this capability as well -- 'rdesktop',
    which allows Linux to connect to WinServer boxes with
    appropriate privileges/logins.

    Not sure if there's a Linux daemon for rdesktop, but
    Unix/Linux does give several alternatives for Unix/Linux
    equivalents:

    [1] Remote window capability.

    ssh -CXY usernamemachine [command]

    (The -Y is needed for me; I'm not entirely sure why.
    It enables trusted X11 forwarding and bypasses X11 SECURITY
    extension controls, according to the ssh(1) manpage.
    -C is for compression and I specify it out of habit;
    it's probably redundant. man ssh(1) for more info on
    these options.)

    Dragging and dropping will work in this mode, as will
    copy/paste; both windows are on the same X server, but the
    clients can be scattered worldwide (and the client will
    think it's opened to a local X server, which is actually
    an X proxy implemented by sshd). Window management is
    the server's/local machine's responsibility.

    [2] Remote server/screen capability. This looks a bit strange but:

    Xnest :1 -auth
    DISPLAY=:1 ssh -CXY usernamemachine [command]

    DISPLAY=:1 [local]
    or
    [remote]

    This is identical to [1] except that everything's contained
    in the Xnest screen, which might be helpful for organizing
    windows.

    Drag and drop will *NOT* work in this mode; neither will
    copy/paste.

    The window manager can be put on either machine.

    [3] Remote session capability. See [2], but then also, on
    the remote machine:

    gnome-session
    or
    startkde
    or
    xsm

    depending on GUI preference. The window manager is on
    the remote machine (as it's usually bundled with the
    environment, except maybe for xsm, which is just the
    session manager -- but firing up xsm did start twm for me).

    [4] Linux does have a VNC client and VNC server. While I'm
    not sure VNC is standardized, it is very widely used, and
    is simple to set up; in Gnome all one has to do is enable
    "Allow other users to view your desktop" in Gnome's Remote
    Desktop Preferences.

    Note that vnc isn't all that secure unless one uses
    ssh or equivalent as an intermediary;
    http://members.shaw.ca/nicholas.fong/vnc/
    gives several example setups.

    Of these, [3] is the closest to rdesktop, and there's
    probably a fair amount of functionality missing on the
    Linux side -- for example, dragging and dropping file icons
    might work in rdesktop (I'd have to try it); it certainly
    will *not* work with Xnest. Of course workarounds such as
    scp and samba are entirely possible, and probably easier
    to control (at one point, one joke about Amiga/Intuition
    was that it was possible to watch all of one's folders
    vanish if one misdrops an icon; hopefully Windows is better
    controlled, but one does wonder).

    And for those of you out there who complain "oh, that's
    just wayyyyy too much typing", well, that's your problem;
    youngsters after all can text like crazy on mobile 10-pads,
    and probably can handle touch-typing on a QWERTY no
    problem; why can't you? :-)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux makes one use one's mind.
    Windows just messes with one's head.
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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