DRM is Theft ~~still - Linux

This is a discussion on DRM is Theft ~~still - Linux ; Interview: Microsoft's Rob Bennett defends DRM decision Posted by Greg Sandoval | 13 comments Rob Bennett knew people were going to be angry. Bennett is the Microsoft executive who notified former customers of the now defunct MSN Music service on ...

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  1. DRM is Theft ~~still


    Interview: Microsoft's Rob Bennett defends DRM decision
    Posted by Greg Sandoval | 13 comments

    Rob Bennett knew people were going to be angry.

    Bennett is the Microsoft executive who notified former customers of the now defunct MSN Music service on Tuesday that the company would no longer issue DRM keys for their songs after August 31. This means that, while former customers can listen to their music on authorized computers for as long as the hardware lasts, they won't be able to transfer songs to a new PC after that deadline.
    "Had we had the ability to deliver DRM-free tracks at the time, we absolutely would have done that. We talked to the labels at the time about that."
    --Rob Bennett, Microsoft executive

    In an interview with CNET News.com, Bennett said that continuing to support the DRM keys was impractical, that the issue only affects a "small number" of people and that focusing exclusively on Zune was the best way to go. He also noted that it wasn't Microsoft's decision to wrap music into digital rights management.

    The reason for shutting down the DRM-licensing servers was "every time there is an OS upgrade, the DRM equation gets complex very quickly," said Bennett, general manager of entertainment, video, and sports for MSN. "Every time, you saw support issues. People would call in because they couldn't download licenses. We had to write new code, new configurations each time...We really believe that, going forward, the best thing to do is focus exclusively on Zune."

    Microsoft shut down MSN Music in November 2006, following a failed effort to turn the site into a legitimate iTunes challenger. Redmond threw its resources behind the Zune digital music player and its music store, Marketplace.

    For the past 18 months, Microsoft has continued to enable former customers of MSN Music to move their song libraries to new computers. Discontinuing that service has been widely criticized. Critics have long said that DRM was a means to control legally purchased music at the expense of consumers. To them, the current situation with MSN proves it.

    Bennett defended Microsoft. He said the company never wanted DRM on its songs.

    "Had we had the ability to deliver DRM-free tracks at the time, we absolutely would have done that," Bennett said. "We talked to the labels at the time about that. As a company, we have continued to push for this. Zune has a subset in their catalog of DRM-free MP3s. Now, the industry is making progress. The labels are understanding the downside of DRM when its used the way they wanted to use it, they end up punishing the users who bought music legally more than those who want to circumvent the system."

    Bennett added that Microsoft believes in protecting intellectual property, but the company also wants people to enjoy their media without unreasonable restrictions.

    "No one ever foresaw being in this situation," Bennett said. "It's not something we like to do. We want to make it easy and as painless for our customers as possible. We really feel, in the long term, what's best for people who want to buy music from Microsoft is to move to Zune."

    Bennett said that former MSN Music customers can back up their songs by burning them to CDs. But what about the loss of sound quality should they decide to rerip the music?

    "We (delivered) music at 160 kbps," Bennett said. "In my personal (experience), you're not going to lose that much fidelity."

    --
    http://www.mrbrklyn.com - Interesting Stuff
    http://www.nylxs.com - Leadership Development in Free Software

    So many immigrant groups have swept through our town that Brooklyn, like Atlantis, reaches mythological proportions in the mind of the world - RI Safir 1998

    http://fairuse.nylxs.com DRM is THEFT - We are the STAKEHOLDERS - RI Safir 2002

    "Yeah - I write Free Software...so SUE ME"

    "The tremendous problem we face is that we are becoming sharecroppers to our own cultural heritage -- we need the ability to participate in our own society."

    "> I'm an engineer. I choose the best tool for the job, politics be damned.<
    You must be a stupid engineer then, because politcs and technology have been attached at the hip since the 1st dynasty in Ancient Egypt. I guess you missed that one."

    Copyright for the Digital Millennium


  2. Re: DRM is Theft ~~still

    In article ,
    Ruben quoted:
    > Bennett said that former MSN Music customers can back up their songs by
    > burning them to CDs. But what about the loss of sound quality should they
    > decide to rerip the music?
    >
    > "We (delivered) music at 160 kbps," Bennett said. "In my personal
    > (experience), you're not going to lose that much fidelity."


    When using the burn/rip trick to strip DRM (from any online store, not
    just the old MSN store), the simplest thing to do is use lossless
    compression on the ripped music. Then there will be no quality loss.
    This will use more space, but if you are moving to a new computer, it
    probably has more space than your old computer, and considering that the
    MSN store didn't do well, so you probably don't have a lot of these
    songs in the first place, that's not going to significant. It will be a
    pain in the ass, of course.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  3. Re: DRM is Theft ~~still

    Ruben wrote:

    >
    > Interview: Microsoft's Rob Bennett defends DRM decision
    > Posted by Greg Sandoval | 13 comments
    >
    > Rob Bennett knew people were going to be angry.
    >


    Because people KNOW when they are getting screwed.

    > Bennett is the Microsoft executive who notified former customers of the
    > now defunct MSN Music service on Tuesday that the company would no longer
    > issue DRM keys for their songs after August 31. This means that, while
    > former customers can listen to their music on authorized computers for as
    > long as the hardware lasts, they won't be able to transfer songs to a new
    > PC after that deadline.


    Dear Microsoft consumer... we are going to screw you again.

    > "Had we had the ability to deliver DRM-free tracks
    > at the time, we absolutely would have done that. We talked to the labels
    > at the time about that." --Rob Bennett, Microsoft executive
    >


    It's not our fault...

    > In an interview with CNET News.com, Bennett said that con
    > tinuing to
    > support the DRM keys was impractical, that the issue only affects a "small
    > number" of people and that focusing exclusively on Zune was the best way
    > to go.


    What he's saying is... their customers are worth the effort. Screw them.

    > He also noted that it wasn't Microsoft's decision to wrap music
    > into digital rights management.
    >


    Yeah... right... When pigs fly, I'll believe that one.

    > The reason for shutting down the DRM-licensing servers was "every time
    > there is an OS upgrade, the DRM equation gets complex very quickly," said
    > Bennett, general manager of entertainment, video, and sports for MSN.
    > "Every time, you saw support issues. People would call in because they
    > couldn't download licenses. We had to write new code, new configurations
    > each time...We really believe that, going forward, the best thing to do is
    > focus exclusively on Zune."
    >


    So the DRM server code was a total, unmanageable mess to work with... not
    worth the effort to keep their customer base happy or satisfied.

    > Microsoft shut down MSN Music in November 2006, following a failed effort
    > to turn the site into a legitimate iTunes challenger. Redmond threw its
    > resources behind the Zune digital music player and its music store,
    > Marketplace.
    >
    > For the past 18 months, Microsoft has continued to enable former customers
    > of MSN Music to move their song libraries to new computers. Discontinuing
    > that service has been widely criticized. Critics have long said that DRM
    > was a means to control legally purchased music at the expense of
    > consumers. To them, the current situation with MSN proves it.
    >


    Proves it to a lot of people. Most of us already KNEW IT...

    > Bennett defended Microsoft. He said the company never wanted DRM on its
    > songs.
    >


    Blah...Blah...Blah... What a bag of dirt...

    > "Had we had the ability to deliver DRM-free tracks at the time, we
    > absolutely would have done that," Bennett said. "We talked to the labels
    > at the time about that. As a company, we have continued to push for this.
    > Zune has a subset in their catalog of DRM-free MP3s. Now, the industry is
    > making progress. The labels are understanding the downside of DRM when its
    > used the way they wanted to use it, they end up punishing the users who
    > bought music legally more than those who want to circumvent the system."
    >
    > Bennett added that Microsoft believes in protecting intellectual property,
    > but the company also wants people to enjoy their media without
    > unreasonable restrictions.
    >


    I wonder how he kept from breaking out into uncontrollable laughter?

    > "No one ever foresaw being in this situation," Bennett said. "It's not
    > something we like to do. We want to make it easy and as painless for our
    > customers as possible. We really feel, in the long term, what's best for
    > people who want to buy music from Microsoft is to move to Zune."
    >
    > Bennett said that former MSN Music customers can back up their songs by
    > burning them to CDs. But what about the loss of sound quality should they
    > decide to rerip the music?
    >
    > "We (delivered) music at 160 kbps," Bennett said. "In my personal
    > (experience), you're not going to lose that much fidelity."
    >


    But a lot of people will loose faith. Close down one method of music storage
    and try to push them into another. Most people won't go...

    --

    Jerry McBride (jmcbride@mail-on.us)

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