Making Linux Bullet Proof - Linux

This is a discussion on Making Linux Bullet Proof - Linux ; http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/ Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1 CPU and memory troubleshooting Level: Introductory Daniel Robbins (drobbins@gentoo.org), President/CEO, Gentoo Technologies, Inc. One of Linux's claims to fame is its legendary stability. However, the most stable operating system in the world won't ...

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  1. Making Linux Bullet Proof

    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/

    Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1

    CPU and memory troubleshooting

    Level: Introductory

    Daniel Robbins (drobbins@gentoo.org), President/CEO, Gentoo
    Technologies, Inc.

    One of Linux's claims to fame is its legendary stability.
    However, the most stable operating system in the world won't do
    you any good if your hardware is defective or misconfigured. In
    this article, Daniel Robbins shows you how to diagnose and fix
    CPU flakiness, as well as how to test your RAM for defects. By
    the end of this article, you'll have the skills to ensure that
    your Linux system is as stable as it possibly can be.

    [....]

    Rescuing your CPU

    If your CPU is experiencing random intermittent errors when
    placed under heavy load, it's possible that your CPU isn't
    defective at all -- maybe it simply isn't being cooled properly.
    Here are some things that you can check:

    * Is your CPU fan plugged in?
    * Is it relatively dust-free?
    * Does the fan actually spin (and spin at the proper speed)
    when the power is on?
    * Is the heat sink seated properly on the CPU?
    * Is there thermal grease between the CPU and the heat sink?
    * Does your case have adequate ventilation?

    If everything seems fine, then you may want to rerun the kernel
    compile tests with an open case. Let the kernel compile go for
    about five minutes and then put your hand inside the running
    machine and touch the outside metal casing of the power supply to
    ground yourself. Then, carefully test the temperature of the heat
    sink with the tip of your finger. If it's unusually hot, then
    it's very possible that your heatsink/fan combo just isn't
    adequate for your particular CPU. In that case, upgrade your
    system's cooling hardware -- hopefully, your CPU hasn't sustained
    any permanent damage and is still functional.
    --
    HPT

  2. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:

    > http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >
    > [quote]
    > Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1


    Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and counting
    of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution in site.


    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof


    "High Plains Thumper" wrote in
    message news:4806b6ba$0$22075$6e1ede2f@read.cnntp.org...
    > http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >
    >
    > Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
    >
    > CPU and memory troubleshooting
    >
    > Level: Introductory
    >
    > Daniel Robbins (drobbins@gentoo.org), President/CEO, Gentoo
    > Technologies, Inc.
    >
    > One of Linux's claims to fame is its legendary stability. However,
    > the most stable operating system in the world won't do you any good if
    > your hardware is defective or misconfigured. In this article, Daniel
    > Robbins shows you how to diagnose and fix CPU flakiness, as well as
    > how to test your RAM for defects. By the end of this article, you'll
    > have the skills to ensure that your Linux system is as stable as it
    > possibly can be.
    >
    > [....]
    >
    > Rescuing your CPU
    >
    > If your CPU is experiencing random intermittent errors when placed
    > under heavy load, it's possible that your CPU isn't defective at
    > all -- maybe it simply isn't being cooled properly. Here are some
    > things that you can check:
    >
    > * Is your CPU fan plugged in?
    > * Is it relatively dust-free?
    > * Does the fan actually spin (and spin at the proper speed) when
    > the power is on?
    > * Is the heat sink seated properly on the CPU?
    > * Is there thermal grease between the CPU and the heat sink?
    > * Does your case have adequate ventilation?
    >
    > If everything seems fine, then you may want to rerun the kernel
    > compile tests with an open case. Let the kernel compile go for about
    > five minutes and then put your hand inside the running machine and
    > touch the outside metal casing of the power supply to ground yourself.
    > Then, carefully test the temperature of the heat sink with the tip of
    > your finger. If it's unusually hot, then it's very possible that your
    > heatsink/fan combo just isn't adequate for your particular CPU. In
    > that case, upgrade your system's cooling hardware -- hopefully, your
    > CPU hasn't sustained any permanent damage and is still functional.
    >
    >
    > --
    > HPT


    Very good point! I took off the cooling assembly from the cpu of a
    machine I had purchased assembled, and surprise, it had been installed
    on top of a paper label left on the cpu. Some people say, if your
    hardware works, don't mess with it. They have a point. Mine is,
    when you bring in something new, first make sure you can pull it
    apart and reassemble it after a common-sense eyeball test of each
    component and then making sure each component fits well and
    comfortably into the place where it belongs. It usually works if
    you don't do this, but it's risky, you're trusting a mystery box.

    Titeotwawki -- mha [comp.os.linux.advocacy 2008 Apr 17]



  4. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    Verily I say unto thee, that Martha Adams spake thusly:

    > Very good point! I took off the cooling assembly from the cpu of a
    > machine I had purchased assembled, and surprise, it had been
    > installed on top of a paper label left on the cpu. Some people say,
    > if your hardware works, don't mess with it. They have a point. Mine
    > is, when you bring in something new, first make sure you can pull it
    > apart and reassemble it after a common-sense eyeball test of each
    > component and then making sure each component fits well and
    > comfortably into the place where it belongs. It usually works if you
    > don't do this, but it's risky, you're trusting a mystery box.


    It stands to reason that there'll be some loosening of components in
    transit, so it really makes sense to reseat everything after delivery.
    Of course, as you've discovered, there can be other reasons

    An even more common problem than ineffective/broken cooling is bad
    memory, which is highly prone to damage from electrostatic discharge,
    and produces the kind of random errors that confuse people into
    attributing the problem to software issues, leading to a great deal of
    frustration and wasted time. This is why Fedora (and many other distros)
    comes with memtest86 on the install disc, as a boot option. I've found,
    however, that a continuous kernel recompile is a better burn-in test
    than memtest86, which doesn't stress things like DMA and I/O memory in
    it's tests, and thus often misses error conditions. If a kernel compile
    segfaults, that's a fairly good indication that you have bad RAM.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | 'When it comes to knowledge, "ownership" just doesn't make sense'
    | ~ Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. http://tinyurl.com/22bgx8
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.23.8-63.fc8
    16:41:50 up 118 days, 13:17, 3 users, load average: 0.01, 0.01, 0.00

  5. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    > On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>
    >> [quote]
    >> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1

    >
    > Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and
    > counting of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution
    > in site.


    Make Linux bullet-proof; encase your setup in perspex - Now there's an
    interesting case-mod.

    --
    http://www.kustomkomputa.co.uk
    - Personalised Desktop Computers



  6. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>
    >> [quote]
    >> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1

    >
    >Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and counting
    >of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution in site.



    What version of Ubuntu are you using?

    I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is hasn't
    locked/froze or crashed yet.

  7. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    thetruthhurts @homail.com writes:

    > On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>>
    >>> [quote]
    >>> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1

    >>
    >>Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and counting
    >>of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution in site.

    >
    >
    > What version of Ubuntu are you using?
    >
    > I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is hasn't
    > locked/froze or crashed yet.


    What part of "65+ pages" confuses you so?

    When will you people understand - it's not about YOU. It's about other
    people and perception. All this "works for me" in the face of so many
    other people having issues marks you out as a liar OR your needs are so
    minimal that you do not stress the install in any way.

    I'm a committed Debian user but its far from bug free - how could it be?
    99.999% of the SW on it is the same more or less as the other distros
    having issues.

    --
    Looks like the channel is back to normal
    You mean it's not scrolling faster than anyone can read?
    -- Seen on #Debian after the release of Debian 2.0

  8. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 19:56:29 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > thetruthhurts @homail.com writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>>>
    >>>> [quote]
    >>>> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
    >>>
    >>>Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and counting
    >>>of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution in site.

    >>
    >>
    >> What version of Ubuntu are you using?
    >>
    >> I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is hasn't
    >> locked/froze or crashed yet.

    >
    > What part of "65+ pages" confuses you so?
    >
    > When will you people understand - it's not about YOU. It's about other
    > people and perception. All this "works for me" in the face of so many
    > other people having issues marks you out as a liar OR your needs are so
    > minimal that you do not stress the install in any way.
    >
    > I'm a committed Debian user but its far from bug free - how could it be?
    > 99.999% of the SW on it is the same more or less as the other distros
    > having issues.


    Well stated.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  9. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On Thursday 17 April 2008 13:56, Hadron wrote:

    > thetruthhurts @homail.com writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>>>
    >>>> [quote]
    >>>> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
    >>>
    >>>Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and
    >>>counting of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution
    >>>in site.

    >>
    >>
    >> What version of Ubuntu are you using?
    >>
    >> I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is
    >> hasn't
    >> locked/froze or crashed yet.

    >
    > What part of "65+ pages" confuses you so?
    >
    > When will you people understand - it's not about YOU. It's about other
    > people and perception. All this "works for me" in the face of so many
    > other people having issues marks you out as a liar OR your needs are
    > so minimal that you do not stress the install in any way.
    >
    > I'm a committed Debian user but its far from bug free - how could it
    > be? 99.999% of the SW on it is the same more or less as the other
    > distros having issues.
    >


    It's not difficult to spot the Micro$oft propagandists. Just ignoite
    the troll.

    No O/S is going to be 100% bulletproof, but Linux is far better that
    Vista or anything that Micro$ucks ever put out, period!
    --
    Peace,
    Fred

  10. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof


    >
    > What version of Ubuntu are you using?


    It's a new one, called DFSubuntu. It freezes and locks up on any
    hardware it is installed on.

    I didn't notice the cross posting before I hit Send.

  11. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    Homer wrote:

    > I've found, however, that a continuous kernel recompile is a
    > better burn-in test than memtest86, which doesn't stress
    > things like DMA and I/O memory in it's tests, and thus often
    > misses error conditions. If a kernel compile segfaults, that's
    > a fairly good indication that you have bad RAM.


    ..... or need to reseat first, then try again. Sometimes even
    simple things such as reseating chipsets, processor, jumpers
    help. In places with high humidity, motherboards are more apt to
    collect hard to see fungi, oxidation on connectors, so reseating
    everything is a good prophylactic measure.

    Another way is to install slopware like Vista. But then you have
    to figure out whether it is the hardware or software.

    --
    HPT

  12. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 19:56:29 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > thetruthhurts @homail.com writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>>>
    >>>> [quote]
    >>>> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
    >>>
    >>>Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and
    >>>counting of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution
    >>>in site.

    >>
    >>
    >> What version of Ubuntu are you using?
    >>
    >> I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is hasn't
    >> locked/froze or crashed yet.

    >
    > What part of "65+ pages" confuses you so?
    >


    So go use windows already...

    --
    Stephan
    1986 Pontiac Fiero GT

    君の事思い出す日なんてないのは
    君の事忘れたときがないから

  13. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    > No O/S is going to be 100% bulletproof, but Linux is far better
    > that
    > Vista or anything that Micro$ucks ever put out, period!


    Fred? wrong Fred

    now what?

    Rich

    one wonders, how many bullets have you taken using Linux?


  14. Re: Making Linux Bullet Proof

    On 2008-04-17, Hadron wrote:
    > thetruthhurts @homail.com writes:
    >
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 22:56:06 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 20:32:25 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-hw1/
    >>>>
    >>>> [quote]
    >>>> Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
    >>>
    >>>Try posting it in the Ubuntu forums where they have 65+ pages and counting
    >>>of people with Linux freezing and locking up and no solution in site.

    >>
    >>
    >> What version of Ubuntu are you using?
    >>
    >> I installed Ubuntu 7 in about 20 minutes, 2 months ago and is hasn't
    >> locked/froze or crashed yet.

    >
    > What part of "65+ pages" confuses you so?
    >
    > When will you people understand - it's not about YOU. It's about other


    Well... it's not just about me but it's about a large number of other
    people and CORPORATIONS that run Linux for important work without trouble.

    > people and perception. All this "works for me" in the face of so many
    > other people having issues marks you out as a liar OR your needs are so
    > minimal that you do not stress the install in any way.


    OTOH, some people could just have hardware bad or they could be doing
    something strange and then not telling the nice people that try to help
    them afterwards.

    There was a nice dual audio card situation a while back that you weenies
    were getting all hot and bothered about.

    >
    > I'm a committed Debian user but its far from bug free - how could it be?
    > 99.999% of the SW on it is the same more or less as the other distros
    > having issues.
    >


    Now what's really interesting is when some joker like you says "it can't
    be done" or "it isn't supported" and it's something that one of us is
    doing at that very moment.


    --
    OpenDoc is moot when Apple is your one stop iShop. |||
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