Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System" - Linux

This is a discussion on Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System" - Linux ; LMAO!!! Gently now - let's tenderly fix that frozen-up junk of an operating system. "Linux users: On your next system freeze, when CTRL + ALT + BACKSPACE leaves you high and dry, don't reach for the power button. Rather than ...

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Thread: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

  1. Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    LMAO!!! Gently now - let's tenderly fix that frozen-up junk of an operating
    system.


    "Linux users: On your next system freeze, when CTRL + ALT + BACKSPACE leaves
    you high and dry, don't reach for the power button. Rather than forcing the
    system to shut down (which can do quite a bit of damage to your
    system-especially if data is being written to the hard drive), the FOSSwire
    web site explains a safer technique for restarting your system.

    1. Hold down the Alt and SysRq (Print Screen) keys.

    2. While holding those down, type the following in order. Nothing will
    appear to happen until the last letter is pressed: REISUB

    3. Watch your computer reboot magically.

    This sequence of keystrokes will kill all programs, unmount your drives and
    restart. FOSSwire recommends remembering this key sequence with the phrase
    "Raising Elephants Is So Utterly Boring.""

    http://lifehacker.com/software/linux...tem-298891.php






  2. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Tue, 15 Apr 2008 23:56:58 -0400, DFS wrote:

    > LMAO!!! Gently now - let's tenderly fix that frozen-up junk of an operating
    > system.
    >
    >
    > "Linux users: On your next system freeze, when CTRL + ALT + BACKSPACE leaves
    > you high and dry, don't reach for the power button. Rather than forcing the
    > system to shut down (which can do quite a bit of damage to your
    > system-especially if data is being written to the hard drive), the FOSSwire
    > web site explains a safer technique for restarting your system.
    >
    > 1. Hold down the Alt and SysRq (Print Screen) keys.
    >
    > 2. While holding those down, type the following in order. Nothing will
    > appear to happen until the last letter is pressed: REISUB
    >
    > 3. Watch your computer reboot magically.
    >
    > This sequence of keystrokes will kill all programs, unmount your drives and
    > restart. FOSSwire recommends remembering this key sequence with the phrase
    > "Raising Elephants Is So Utterly Boring.""
    >
    > http://lifehacker.com/software/linux...tem-298891.php


    But I thought Linux never freezes?
    According to what I read in COLA, Windows is the only operating system that
    has these kinds of problems.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  3. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (aka: Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

    Traits:

    * Nym shifting (see below)
    * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    * Homophobic
    * Racist
    * Habitual liar
    * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA

  4. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    Moshe Goldfarb :
    > On Tue, 15 Apr 2008 23:56:58 -0400, DFS wrote:
    >
    >> LMAO!!! Gently now - let's tenderly fix that frozen-up junk of an operating
    >> system.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Linux users: On your next system freeze, when CTRL + ALT + BACKSPACE leaves
    >> you high and dry, don't reach for the power button. Rather than forcing the
    >> system to shut down (which can do quite a bit of damage to your
    >> system-especially if data is being written to the hard drive), the FOSSwire
    >> web site explains a safer technique for restarting your system.
    >>
    >> 1. Hold down the Alt and SysRq (Print Screen) keys.
    >>
    >> 2. While holding those down, type the following in order. Nothing will
    >> appear to happen until the last letter is pressed: REISUB
    >>
    >> 3. Watch your computer reboot magically.
    >>
    >> This sequence of keystrokes will kill all programs, unmount your drives and
    >> restart. FOSSwire recommends remembering this key sequence with the phrase
    >> "Raising Elephants Is So Utterly Boring.""
    >>
    >> http://lifehacker.com/software/linux...tem-298891.php

    >
    > But I thought Linux never freezes?


    Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    instead of actually understanding them.

    > According to what I read in COLA, Windows is the only operating system that
    > has these kinds of problems.



    --
    Did an Italian CRANE OPERATOR just experience uninhibited sensations in
    a MALIBU HOT TUB?

    www.websterscafe.com

  5. Re: Vista ME tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    Paul Wannamaker wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (aka: Gary Stewart)
    >
    > http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    > http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html
    >
    > Traits:
    >
    > * Nym shifting (see below)
    > * Self confessed thief and proud of it
    > * Homophobic
    > * Racist
    > * Habitual liar
    > * Frequently cross posts replies to other non-Linux related newsgroups
    > * Frequently cross posts articles originally not posted to COLA


    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  6. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    [snips]

    On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:

    > Moshe Goldfarb :


    >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >
    > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    > instead of actually understanding them.


    He *reads*?


  7. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    > > Moshe Goldfarb :
    > >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >
    > > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    > > instead of actually understanding them.

    >
    > He *reads*?


    If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in
    this way, however.

  8. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"


    wrote in message
    news:83ea4bee-67c8-42e5-adcd-d9ac0b130a97@m1g2000pre.googlegroups.com...
    > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >>
    >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    >> > instead of actually understanding them.

    >>
    >> He *reads*?

    >
    > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in
    > this way, however.


    Works fine so long as X doesn't lockup your keyboard in which case you're
    screwed. Unless of course you expect households to keep a 2nd computer
    around so that they can telnet/ssh into the linux box and kill X remotely.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  9. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    "nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu" writes:

    > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >>
    >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    >> > instead of actually understanding them.

    >>
    >> He *reads*?

    >
    > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in
    > this way, however.


    If C-A-BS doesnt work then the chance of ctl-alt-f1 working is almost
    zero. As you well know.

  10. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:

    > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >>
    >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put
    >> > here instead of actually understanding them.

    >>
    >> He *reads*?

    >
    > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and kill
    > X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in this
    > way, however.


    I have, but not in some time. Nowadays, if the system freezes like that,
    the whole system is frozen, usually due to flaky hardware. It happens -
    I went through three new drives, each of which failed shortly after
    install, until I got a good one. That caused me no end of fun.


  11. Re: Vista ME tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    Don't bother, it's hopeless. Convert your computer into a paper weight and
    buy a new one with Linux pre-installed.

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  12. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Apr 21, 1:15 pm, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700, ness...@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    > > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > >> [snips]

    >
    > >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    > >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    > >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >
    > >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put
    > >> > here instead of actually understanding them.

    >
    > >> He *reads*?

    >
    > > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    > > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and kill
    > > X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in this
    > > way, however.

    >
    > I have, but not in some time. Nowadays, if the system freezes like that,
    > the whole system is frozen, usually due to flaky hardware. It happens -
    > I went through three new drives, each of which failed shortly after
    > install, until I got a good one. That caused me no end of fun.


    Sounds bad. What were the brands of the bad drives? Were they on
    warranty? It must have made you doubt what the problem really was.

  13. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 14:09:49 -0700, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:

    > On Apr 21, 1:15 pm, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700, ness...@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    >> > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> >> [snips]

    >>
    >> >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >> >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >> >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >>
    >> >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put
    >> >> > here instead of actually understanding them.

    >>
    >> >> He *reads*?

    >>
    >> > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    >> > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    >> > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me
    >> > in this way, however.

    >>
    >> I have, but not in some time. Nowadays, if the system freezes like
    >> that, the whole system is frozen, usually due to flaky hardware. It
    >> happens - I went through three new drives, each of which failed shortly
    >> after install, until I got a good one. That caused me no end of fun.
    >>

    >
    > Sounds bad. What were the brands of the bad drives? Were they on
    > warranty? It must have made you doubt what the problem really was.


    I don't recall whether the first two were WD or Maxtor, but they were the
    same brand - store special that week. Third time, I dropped in a Seagate
    of the same size, it worked.

    Oh, whoops - I said three new drives, each of which failed. My bad; the
    first two failed, the third has been running, round the clock, as my
    media storage drive, since then.

    And no, it was the drives; I had the boys at the shop check 'em. One
    wouldn't respond at all - just the unpleasant sound of the heads banging
    against the stops, over and over and over, while the other did respond
    but spewed out an endless series of errors, including a SMART report
    which, in short, said "The drive's dead. Replace it."


  14. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    Kelsey Bjarnason writes:

    > On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 14:09:49 -0700, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    >
    >> On Apr 21, 1:15 pm, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700, ness...@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    >>> > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>> >> [snips]
    >>>
    >>> >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >>> >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >>> >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?
    >>>
    >>> >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put
    >>> >> > here instead of actually understanding them.
    >>>
    >>> >> He *reads*?
    >>>
    >>> > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    >>> > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    >>> > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me
    >>> > in this way, however.
    >>>
    >>> I have, but not in some time. Nowadays, if the system freezes like
    >>> that, the whole system is frozen, usually due to flaky hardware. It
    >>> happens - I went through three new drives, each of which failed shortly
    >>> after install, until I got a good one. That caused me no end of fun.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Sounds bad. What were the brands of the bad drives? Were they on
    >> warranty? It must have made you doubt what the problem really was.

    >
    > I don't recall whether the first two were WD or Maxtor, but they were the
    > same brand - store special that week. Third time, I dropped in a Seagate
    > of the same size, it worked.
    >
    > Oh, whoops - I said three new drives, each of which failed. My bad; the
    > first two failed, the third has been running, round the clock, as my
    > media storage drive, since then.
    >
    > And no, it was the drives; I had the boys at the shop check 'em. One
    > wouldn't respond at all - just the unpleasant sound of the heads banging
    > against the stops, over and over and over, while the other did respond
    > but spewed out an endless series of errors, including a SMART report
    > which, in short, said "The drive's dead. Replace it."



    Only in Kelsey land could you possibly get 2 HDs in a row playing up. I
    never once in over 20 years of using "personal" HDs had one fail. Not so
    much as once.

    And in COLA they then rush to blame the manufacturer -even IF they are
    the most commonly used brand in the world. Do ANY of you believe his
    garbage? Unless someone was right when they said Kelsey digs his HW out
    of the local trash pile.



  15. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:12:58 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > Kelsey Bjarnason writes:
    >
    >> On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 14:09:49 -0700, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Apr 21, 1:15 pm, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>>> On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700, ness...@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:
    >>>> > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >>>> >> [snips]
    >>>>
    >>>> >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >>>> >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >>>> >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?
    >>>>
    >>>> >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put
    >>>> >> > here instead of actually understanding them.
    >>>>
    >>>> >> He *reads*?
    >>>>
    >>>> > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    >>>> > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    >>>> > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me
    >>>> > in this way, however.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have, but not in some time. Nowadays, if the system freezes like
    >>>> that, the whole system is frozen, usually due to flaky hardware. It
    >>>> happens - I went through three new drives, each of which failed shortly
    >>>> after install, until I got a good one. That caused me no end of fun.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Sounds bad. What were the brands of the bad drives? Were they on
    >>> warranty? It must have made you doubt what the problem really was.

    >>
    >> I don't recall whether the first two were WD or Maxtor, but they were the
    >> same brand - store special that week. Third time, I dropped in a Seagate
    >> of the same size, it worked.
    >>
    >> Oh, whoops - I said three new drives, each of which failed. My bad; the
    >> first two failed, the third has been running, round the clock, as my
    >> media storage drive, since then.
    >>
    >> And no, it was the drives; I had the boys at the shop check 'em. One
    >> wouldn't respond at all - just the unpleasant sound of the heads banging
    >> against the stops, over and over and over, while the other did respond
    >> but spewed out an endless series of errors, including a SMART report
    >> which, in short, said "The drive's dead. Replace it."

    >
    >
    > Only in Kelsey land could you possibly get 2 HDs in a row playing up. I
    > never once in over 20 years of using "personal" HDs had one fail. Not so
    > much as once.
    >
    > And in COLA they then rush to blame the manufacturer -even IF they are
    > the most commonly used brand in the world. Do ANY of you believe his
    > garbage? Unless someone was right when they said Kelsey digs his HW out
    > of the local trash pile.


    Like I've said before, Kelsey should not even be allowed in the computer
    room let alone near a computer.

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  16. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu

    wrote
    on Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:27:24 -0700 (PDT)
    <83ea4bee-67c8-42e5-adcd-d9ac0b130a97@m1g2000pre.googlegroups.com>:
    > On Apr 21, 9:00 am, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 17:55:31 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >> > Moshe Goldfarb :
    >> >> But I thought Linux never freezes?

    >>
    >> > Probably because you've read what you want to read into posts put here
    >> > instead of actually understanding them.

    >>
    >> He *reads*?

    >
    > If Ctl-Alt-Backspace doesn't work, it means you can't kill X in the
    > usual way. I'd just go to a CLI terminal (ctl-F1 for example) and
    > kill X from there. No need to reboot. I've never had X fail on me in
    > this way, however.


    Easier said than done for some lockups. Ctrl-Alt-Backspace
    and Ctrl-Alt-F1 both assume a functional video system --
    and there's a fair number of possibilities in there.

    (The same could be said for Windows, of course; in theory,
    Windows always responds to Ctrl-Alt-Del, by popping up
    that six-option requester.)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux. Because life's too short for a buggy OS.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  17. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    [snips]

    On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 10:27:16 -0700, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

    > Easier said than done for some lockups. Ctrl-Alt-Backspace and
    > Ctrl-Alt-F1 both assume a functional video system -- and there's a fair
    > number of possibilities in there.
    >
    > (The same could be said for Windows, of course; in theory, Windows
    > always responds to Ctrl-Alt-Del, by popping up that six-option
    > requester.)


    Ooh, if only it _were_ "always".

    The girlfriend's sister's machine is sick. Sick, sick, sick.

    It was in somewhat sad shape a couple weeks back, but we got it all
    cleaned up, things were going well enough. Then she calls us, says the
    machine is seriously FUed.

    We've got her set up with VNC so I can remote in - she lives a good
    hour's drive away. I remote in and look around and good god, this box is
    a mess.

    There's something running, somewhere in the machine, which keeps popping
    up a window saying "Your machine may be infected, go to this site to do a
    scan" or words to that effect. It is, of course, a piece of malware,
    rather than a legit protection tool.

    Okay, first item - fire up the task manager, find out what processes are
    running. "Your administrator has disabled the task manager." No, the
    malware has.

    Grr. Let's try the registry editor - if we can maybe wipe any of the
    auto-run crud, there's a vague hope we might bypass this thing long
    enough to nuke it. "Your administrator has disabled the registry editor."

    Oh, goody.

    Right now, the machine is in such a bad state that she can't even get to
    the start menu to run real apps. Mind you, the malware app is happy to
    pop up regularly, letting her know she needs to scan the machine.

    So inside of about two weeks, she went from a machine as healthy as one
    can regard a Windows machine as being, complete with AV tools and the
    like, all updated (and auto-updating), to something so riddled with
    malware she cannot use it for any actual purpose.

    Fortunately, a month or three back, we set it up as a dual-boot with
    Ubuntu, which means she can boot into that to get her actual work done.
    Which is actually what she generally does anyhow, but she likes the
    gaming, so she keeps Windows around for that.

    Current leading suspects are either the latest batch of screensavers
    she's downloaded, or the latest batch of those "cute little games" she
    insists upon downloading from every random site on the net.

    Sigh.

    Windows: where do you want to be savaged today?


  18. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 16:00:10 GMT, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:


    > Ooh, if only it _were_ "always".
    >
    > The girlfriend's sister's machine is sick. Sick, sick, sick.
    >


    Her first problem Kelsey, was letting you anywhere near the machine.
    Some people should not be allowed near the innards of a computer.
    You are one of them.



    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  19. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Kelsey Bjarnason

    wrote
    on Mon, 28 Apr 2008 16:00:10 GMT
    :
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 10:27:16 -0700, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >
    >> Easier said than done for some lockups. Ctrl-Alt-Backspace and
    >> Ctrl-Alt-F1 both assume a functional video system -- and there's a fair
    >> number of possibilities in there.
    >>
    >> (The same could be said for Windows, of course; in theory, Windows
    >> always responds to Ctrl-Alt-Del, by popping up that six-option
    >> requester.)

    >
    > Ooh, if only it _were_ "always".


    I did say "in theory". ;-)

    >
    > The girlfriend's sister's machine is sick. Sick, sick, sick.
    >
    > It was in somewhat sad shape a couple weeks back, but we got it all
    > cleaned up,


    You thought. ;-) Sorry to have to mention this, but
    at least in Linux I can rebuild most of the system from
    scratch -- even the compiler -- if I absolutely had to.

    (Gentoo makes it easy. The only thing *not* built is the stage1 starter
    kit, though unfortunately they no longer support stage1 installs apart
    from a bare mention.)

    With Windows, viruses hide real well (an issue even back in the DOS
    days), and the more sophisticated ones polymorph to avoid detection.

    > things were going well enough. Then she calls us, says the
    > machine is seriously FUed.
    >
    > We've got her set up with VNC so I can remote in - she lives a good
    > hour's drive away. I remote in and look around and good god, this box is
    > a mess.


    I hope it's a secure channel, for your sake. :-/

    >
    > There's something running, somewhere in the machine, which keeps popping
    > up a window saying "Your machine may be infected, go to this site to do a
    > scan" or words to that effect. It is, of course, a piece of malware,
    > rather than a legit protection tool.
    >
    > Okay, first item - fire up the task manager, find out what processes are
    > running. "Your administrator has disabled the task manager." No, the
    > malware has.


    Ick #1.

    >
    > Grr. Let's try the registry editor - if we can maybe wipe any of the
    > auto-run crud, there's a vague hope we might bypass this thing long
    > enough to nuke it. "Your administrator has disabled the registry editor."


    Ick #2.

    >
    > Oh, goody.
    >
    > Right now, the machine is in such a bad state that she can't even get to
    > the start menu to run real apps. Mind you, the malware app is happy to
    > pop up regularly, letting her know she needs to scan the machine.


    With what? Something from the malware site that will allow
    it to become a fully invested zombie, as opposed to merely
    a partially infested one?

    Ye gods.

    >
    > So inside of about two weeks, she went from a machine as healthy as one
    > can regard a Windows machine as being, complete with AV tools and the
    > like, all updated (and auto-updating), to something so riddled with
    > malware she cannot use it for any actual purpose.
    >
    > Fortunately, a month or three back, we set it up as a dual-boot with
    > Ubuntu, which means she can boot into that to get her actual work done.
    > Which is actually what she generally does anyhow, but she likes the
    > gaming, so she keeps Windows around for that.


    Windows. When one really does want to play all sorts of
    games, such as Hunt The Malware.

    >
    > Current leading suspects are either the latest batch of screensavers
    > she's downloaded, or the latest batch of those "cute little games" she
    > insists upon downloading from every random site on the net.


    I'll admit to wondering how much malware is distributed
    through advertising channels. Orbitz in particular
    distributes Flash games on occasion through CNN (they're
    legit if slightly annoying, but I've seen ads stating
    "Your computer has been infected with a virus! Click here
    today!" on other sites I personally like to visit --
    I'm an avid Flash gamer).

    >
    > Sigh.
    >
    > Windows: where do you want to be savaged today?
    >


    That's pretty savage, that. Yowch. The good news: a lot
    of Flash games are playable through Mozilla Firefox, with
    the Adobe plugin. (Or one can use Galeon or Epiphany or
    even Kazehakase.)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. Now in nine exciting editions. Try them all!
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  20. Re: Linux tips: "Gently Restart A Frozen System"

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Moshe Goldfarb

    wrote
    on Mon, 28 Apr 2008 12:08:13 -0400
    <15svh3wnedair.byzbxey4bm88$.dlg@40tude.net>:
    > On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 16:00:10 GMT, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Ooh, if only it _were_ "always".
    >>
    >> The girlfriend's sister's machine is sick. Sick, sick, sick.
    >>

    >
    > Her first problem Kelsey, was letting you anywhere near the machine.
    > Some people should not be allowed near the innards of a computer.
    > You are one of them.
    >


    Oh, I see. So having her dump him would solve her
    machine's problems, then?

    Somehow, I doubt it...

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. Now in nine exciting editions. Try them all!
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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