[News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux - Linux ; Compiz is Cool – and Why That Matters ,----[ Quote ] | One of the most vexed questions within the open source world is when, if | ever, GNU/Linux will take off on the desktop. Strangely, this isn't really | ...

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Thread: [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

  1. [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

    Compiz is Cool – and Why That Matters

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | One of the most vexed questions within the open source world is when, if
    | ever, GNU/Linux will take off on the desktop. Strangely, this isn't really
    | about capabilities: as someone who has Ubuntu running on both of his main
    | systems, I can attest to the fact that GNU/Linux is not just usable, it's a
    | downright pleasure to use. In fact, I constantly marvel at how transparent
    | open source has become: most of the time I'm simply not aware that I'm using
    | it – it just works.
    |
    | This raises the interesting question: so what's missing? What more does open
    | source need to do in order to capture the attention of the general user? I
    | think the answer can be found on this YouTube video.
    `----

    http://www.computerworlduk.com/toolb...=701&blogid=14


    Recent:

    New Cylinder Effect For Compiz Fusion

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Another new compiz fusion effect is being developed called cylinder it looks
    | like the famouse cube plugin for compiz fusion except for the fact that
    | instead of a cube to switch workspaces with compiz fusion you are rotating
    | around a cylinder! *
    `----

    http://neverendinginternet.wordpress...compiz-fusion/


    Compiz is the Most Important Thing to Ever Happen to Linux.

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | If the Linux community wants to wipe Windows and Mac out of the OS business
    | all they need to do in focus all of their collective efforts on developing
    | Compiz. With the combine intelligence of hundreds of thousands of nerds we
    | could develop the most pimped out windows management system known to mankind.
    | The kids don’t want stability, they want an OS w/ rims that spin. * *
    `----

    http://fffff.at/compiz-is-the-most-i...appen-to-linux

  2. Re: [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

    Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    > Compiz is Cool ? and Why That Matters
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    >| One of the most vexed questions within the open source world is when, if
    >| ever, GNU/Linux will take off on the desktop. Strangely, this isn't really
    >| about capabilities: as someone who has Ubuntu running on both of his main
    >| systems, I can attest to the fact that GNU/Linux is not just usable, it's a
    >| downright pleasure to use. In fact, I constantly marvel at how transparent
    >| open source has become: most of the time I'm simply not aware that I'm using
    >| it ? it just works.
    >|
    >| This raises the interesting question: so what's missing? What more does open
    >| source need to do in order to capture the attention of the general user? I
    >| think the answer can be found on this YouTube video.
    > `----
    >
    > http://www.computerworlduk.com/toolb...=701&blogid=14
    >


    Marketing people often refer to the "Wow" factor as the "USP" of a given
    product. It could well be argued (correctly, in my view), that
    Linux distributions are in the main /not/ products in a corporate sense,
    although it's clearly a "product of someone's labour" which is not quite
    the same thing.

    Even so, Linux distributions are certainly up against proprietary
    commercial products, namely Mac OSX and Microsoft Windows Vista, then
    it's worth a rapid consideration of the marketing proposition which
    Linux offers. I rather like this site:
    http://marketing.about.com/od/advert...etmistakes.htm which
    indicates commonly made errors in marketing. Let's take a quick peak
    from a Linux perspective...

    1. Lack of Research and Testing
    2. Improper Focus and Positioning
    3. Marketing without a USP
    4. Failing to Capture Repeat Customers
    5. Lack of Focus on Potential Customer's Needs

    Of the above, it can certainly be said that Linux has had more Research
    and Testing than either Windows Vista or Apple's OSX, considerably more,
    in fact, so we've passed the first hurdle, but what next?

    The second item is about correctly positioning an offering into the
    market, thus avoiding the "solution searching for a problem" so often
    seen in the pitches of sales people to the jaded middle-managers, you
    know, the ones being asked "what's the biggest problem you have right
    now?" and other great leading questions... For Linux distributions,
    though, this has not been too much of an issue. Linux is great where
    the customer wants freedom from vendor lock-in, freedom from malware,
    viruses and so on, security, stability and no licensing costs. Oh yeah,
    and the capability to run on relatively slim, low-power hardware
    platforms. So, it looks like there are enough niche opportunities,
    market segments and so on to keep any marketing guru salivating for
    months, if not more.

    The USP, the third item, has always been the achilles heel, the major
    criticism of the open-source movement, that it "always copies" but
    "never innovates". Anyone deeply involved in foss development will
    probably cringe at this, but looked at from the outside, from a
    non-technical perspective, which *is* most potential customers, Linux
    distributions were doing something a lot like windows, but just not
    quite as well (ie., it didn't *look* as good). Well, Compiz has finally
    tipped the board in this department. Everyone to whom I've shown the
    Compiz effects has gone from amazement to excitement, even to the point
    of wanting to try it themselves - whereas most people are rather nervous
    of computers, and would not normally want to do so. It's quite correct,
    of course, that there are many aspects of foss which are extremely
    innovative, but they're typically too technical for a non-expert to
    comprehend, whereas Compiz, on the other hand, is merely stunning.
    Linux, finally, has the right USP.

    So now we get to the fourth item. So far, Linux adoption has tended to
    be in small steps into different segments. It's been extremely sticky,
    there are very few examples of organisations migrating /to/ linux and
    then migrating away again afterwards (not zero, but very very few).
    Linux, up until recently, though, has not had a great deal of traction
    in the desktop or mobility space, where the end user plays directly.
    The newest generation of highly mobile devices, a segment enabled by
    Linux, and lead by Nokia's N810 and Asus's Eee, have not yet been around
    for long enough that this can be tested, but my last check of Amazon's
    sales showed Asus Eee, Nokia 810 and Apple's Airbook taking virtually
    all of the top-10 seller spots, with Asus Eee right at the top.

    The fifth item, lack of focus on potential customers, is the most
    complex of all of these biccies to bake. By its nature, Linux has been
    developed by people who like to and who want to use it. Perhaps
    counter-intuitively, this has resulted in an exceptionally functional
    and usable set of embedded, mobile, server and desktop environments, as
    well as supporting super-computing requirements to boot. The latest of
    the greatest distributions, Ubuntu and Android have taken this Focus to
    other environments, but in reality, we're probably at the point where
    connectivity and applications for communications of various kinds are
    likely to emerge as the major forward looking requirements.

    I retain my view that the desktop in its traditional sense (Microsoft's
    1980s-like disconnected world view) is very much dead, and that mobility
    and appliances are the future for normal people. I think that the
    future sits with MLI, Android, OLPC, Mythtv, Nokia's N810, Chumby,
    Excito's Bubba, Elonex, Asus Eee, OpenMoko and all those other new and
    innovative devices built around open platforms and open source.
    However, for what remains of the desktop, then Compiz is *the* USP which
    can reel in that market segment.

    --
    | mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | Open platforms prevent vendor lock-in. Own your Own services! |


  3. Re: [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

    Mark Kent wrote:

    > I rather like this site:
    > http://marketing.about.com/od/advert...etmistakes.htm which
    > indicates commonly made errors in marketing. Let's take a quick peak
    > from a Linux perspective...
    >
    > 1. Lack of Research and Testing
    > 2. Improper Focus and Positioning
    > 3. Marketing without a USP
    > 4. Failing to Capture Repeat Customers
    > 5. Lack of Focus on Potential Customer's Needs
    >
    > Of the above, it can certainly be said that Linux has had more
    > Research and Testing than either Windows Vista or Apple's OSX,
    > considerably more, in fact, so we've passed the first hurdle,


    No you haven't. Almost all Linux/OSS products are poorly designed, poorly
    coded, poorly featured, poorly documented, and receive small amounts of crap
    testing and QA. That's why they fail and freeze and lockup so much and have
    so many bugs when they're released in final form.

    Look at Ubuntu. Look at the KDE 4.0 release. Look at the history of MySQL.
    Of OpenOffice.
    Of Gambas. Of native Linux games, etc etc.

    You guys need to open your eyes and try to understand and accept something:
    open source cannot compete with commercial, closed-source programs. And the
    few exceptions proves the rule.



    > Well, Compiz has
    > finally tipped the board in this department. Everyone to whom I've
    > shown the Compiz effects has gone from amazement to excitement, even
    > to the point of wanting to try it themselves - whereas most people
    > are rather nervous of computers, and would not normally want to do
    > so. It's quite correct, of course, that there are many aspects of
    > foss which are extremely innovative, but they're typically too
    > technical for a non-expert to comprehend, whereas Compiz, on the
    > other hand, is merely stunning. Linux, finally, has the right USP.


    Compiz is Linux's 'unique selling proposition'? You're daft. It's an
    extremely buggy, nearly-useless toy. Fun to play with for a few minutes,
    but ultimately a waste of time and computer resources (so it's right where
    it belongs, on Linux).


    > So now we get to the fourth item. So far, Linux adoption has tended
    > to be in small steps into different segments. It's been extremely
    > sticky, there are very few examples of organisations migrating /to/
    > linux and then migrating away again afterwards (not zero, but very
    > very few).


    No duh. The few organizations that do migrate to Linux (vast, vast majority
    being govt and education institutions) do it for cost savings.



    > my last check of Amazon's sales showed Asus Eee, Nokia 810 and
    > Apple's Airbook taking virtually all of the top-10 seller spots, with
    > Asus Eee right at the top.


    And a large chunk of Eee buyers wipe Linux and install XP
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16834220244



    > I retain my view that the desktop in its traditional sense
    > (Microsoft's 1980s-like disconnected world view) is very much dead,


    What are you trying to say - that a computer with no Internet connection is
    in the minority?

    You're a frickin' genius, Kent!



    > and that mobility and appliances are the future for normal people. I
    > think that the future sits with MLI, Android, OLPC, Mythtv, Nokia's
    > N810, Chumby, Excito's Bubba, Elonex, Asus Eee, OpenMoko and all
    > those other new and innovative devices built around open platforms
    > and open source.


    My guess is you're typing this on a desktop system.



    > However, for what remains of the desktop, then
    > Compiz is *the* USP which can reel in that market segment.


    If Compiz eye-candy is desktop Linux's best hope, it's doomed.





  4. Re: [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

    DFS had de volgende lumineuze gedachte op 22-04-08 05:57:

    >
    > No you haven't. Almost all Linux/OSS products are poorly designed, poorly
    > coded, poorly featured, poorly documented, and receive small amounts of crap
    > testing and QA. That's why they fail and freeze and lockup so much and have
    > so many bugs when they're released in final form.
    >

    You mean they are like Windows Vista, a "work in progress"?

    > Look at Ubuntu. Look at the KDE 4.0 release. Look at the history of MySQL.
    > Of OpenOffice.
    > Of Gambas. Of native Linux games, etc etc.
    >
    > You guys need to open your eyes and try to understand and accept something:
    > open source cannot compete with commercial, closed-source programs. And the
    > few exceptions proves the rule.


    The problem is: in the case of a negative statement one exception
    disproves the rule.

    Erik Jan.

  5. Re: [News] Compiz and Compiz-Fusion a Digital Tipping Point for GNU/Linux

    * none peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > DFS had de volgende lumineuze gedachte op 22-04-08 05:57:
    >
    >> No you haven't. Almost all Linux/OSS products are poorly designed, poorly
    >> coded, poorly featured, poorly documented, and receive small amounts of crap
    >> testing and QA. That's why they fail and freeze and lockup so much and have
    >> so many bugs when they're released in final form.
    >>

    > You mean they are like Windows Vista, a "work in progress"?
    >
    >> Look at Ubuntu. Look at the KDE 4.0 release. Look at the history of MySQL.
    >> Of OpenOffice.
    >> Of Gambas. Of native Linux games, etc etc.
    >>
    >> You guys need to open your eyes and try to understand and accept something:
    >> open source cannot compete with commercial, closed-source programs. And the
    >> few exceptions proves the rule.

    >
    > The problem is: in the case of a negative statement one exception
    > disproves the rule.
    >
    > Erik Jan.


    Plus, DFS is simply lying his ass off.

    Linux applications are no more problematic than Windows applications.
    And there are many OSS projects with great QA procedures, /and/ direct
    access to their source-code control repositories based on solid OSS
    products like Subversion, Bazaar-NG, or Mercurial.

    One of the reasons Linux is making headway in servers and supercomputers
    is that it receives a /lot/ of testing.

    I'll bet it even compares favorably to FreeBSD. May need some more work
    to match OpenBSD's record, but I'm only guessing.

    --
    People always fear change. People feared electricity when it was invented,
    didn't they? People feared coal, they feared gas-powered engines...
    There will always be ignorance, and ignorance leads to fear. But with time,
    people will come to accept their silicon masters.
    -- Bill Gates

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