[News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising - Linux

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Thread: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

  1. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    Moshe Goldfarb is flatfish (aka: Gary Stewart)

    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2008/...arb-troll.html
    http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/2007/...ish-troll.html

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  2. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    On 2008-04-06, Hadron wrote:
    >
    > Tony Smith writes:
    >
    >> You say you prefer PCLinuxOS to Ubuntu - as this is based on Mandrake (Mandriva) but uses Synaptic, would
    >> this be like saying someone preferred Linux Mint or any one of the other Ubuntu-based distros to Ubuntu?
    >> Why are there so many distros based on one another, when everyone could pool their skills to make one great
    >> Linux system? I don't get it - perhaps I'll get an answer one day.

    >
    > According to COLA dweebs its better to be able to choose between 3
    > broken ones than have one broken one and one working one. Honestly - you


    "broken" means different things depending on how you intend to use something.

    You probably would view my truck as "broken".

    If you can't understand that different people have different preferences and
    requirements then the whole "Linux" thing is probably beyond you. The free market
    and consumer choice is also probably something that you don't really get either.

    > could not not make it up. It's all about choice.
    >


    There isn't even one version of Windows. Why should there be only one version of Linux?

    If IBM made the server version of Windows and Apple made the desktop version of Windows
    they would certainly diverge quickly and rather significantly. Both versions would also be
    better for it.


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  3. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    On 2008-04-07, Tony Smith wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Apr 2008 20:54:37 -0400, Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >
    >> What you say is true for the most part Tony. Yes, a lot of ready to go
    >> applications etc come with Linux and with Windows these need to be
    >> installed.
    >> For most people this is just a matter of inserting a DVD and hitting
    >> enter a couple of times.
    >> No big problem.
    >>
    >> Linux however DOES have the built in advantage of easy restore should
    >> the system crash due to software or hardware where as Windows requires
    >> the user to now go and locate all those disks, do all the individual
    >> updates etc.
    >>
    >> Of course a $40.00 investment in Acronis or even using one of the free
    >> tools to image the drive once in a while is a huge time saver.
    >>
    >> The average person doesn't however.
    >>
    >> As for your why so many closely related versions of Linux, Hadron
    >> answered you very well and I agree with what he said.

    >
    > A sincere Thank You for a polite and positive reply. Hadron has
    > a certain 'way' about his posts, but I get the gist.
    >
    > It confirms to me my feelings that maybe the way forward is to
    > concentrate on application improvement and developing the
    > PCLinuxOS's and Ubuntus etc, rather than developing a
    > closely related version of what is already available.
    > Does Linux Mint, for example, really need to exist?
    > There are good home-grown tools in Mint by Clem and his team that
    > future Ubuntu's could take on board, and the Mint 'look and feel' could
    > be included as an addition to Ubuntu's appearance/themes choice.
    > The same could be said for many of the Distros out there,
    > and so much time, effort and skill is going to waste by trying to re-invent
    > the wheel.


    You think that re-inventing the wheel is a waste of time. OTOH,
    many of us see this activity for what it is: progress. If it weren't
    for people wanting to re-invent the wheel you would still be driving
    a Model-T (or worse).

    This sort of "waste of energy" goes on all the time in meatspace
    and it yields very distinct measurable benefits. Technology improves
    and you are able to acquire those improvements from someone.

    The fact that 10 or 20 separate companies have their own R&D
    departments fiddling with 100 year old combustion engine technology
    is a necessary means to an end.

    [deletia]

    Your "concerns" about Linux could just as easily apply to cars.

    The forks are generally where the progress comes from.

    --
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    attempt to distort reality to do so. This is what separates |||
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  4. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    >Hadron puked:
    >>
    >> Tony Smith writes:
    >>
    >>> You say you prefer PCLinuxOS to Ubuntu - as this is based on Mandrake (Mandriva) but uses Synaptic, would
    >>> this be like saying someone preferred Linux Mint or any one of the other Ubuntu-based distros to Ubuntu?
    >>> Why are there so many distros based on one another, when everyone could pool their skills to make one great
    >>> Linux system? I don't get it - perhaps I'll get an answer one day.

    >>
    >> According to COLA dweebs its better to be able to choose between 3
    >> broken ones than have one broken one and one working one.


    According to snotty, lying trolls, the fact that there's a lot of
    distros to choose from, some of which are only "beta" quality, means
    that there are no "working ones" available.

    But there are "working ones" available, so there is no dilemma such as
    what the troll implies.

    >> Honestly - you could not not make it up.


    Right. You dishonestly made it up. You're a lying POS.


  5. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    Tony Smith wrote:

    >It confirms to me my feelings that maybe the way forward is to
    >concentrate on application improvement and developing the
    >PCLinuxOS's and Ubuntus etc, rather than developing a
    >closely related version of what is already available.


    Feel free to "concentrate" on whatever you like. That's the beauty of
    FOSS (Free and Open Source Software). Just don't expect that you, or
    anyone else, can control what other people do with their time.

    >Does Linux Mint, for example, really need to exist?
    >There are good home-grown tools in Mint by Clem and his team that
    >future Ubuntu's could take on board, and the Mint 'look and feel' could
    >be included as an addition to Ubuntu's appearance/themes choice.
    >The same could be said for many of the Distros out there,
    >and so much time, effort and skill is going to waste by trying to re-invent
    >the wheel.


    It's not "waste" and it's not "re-inventing". Quite the opposite, in
    fact. Open Source allows to to create new things WITHOUT
    "re-inventing the wheel". Mint is a good example - take something
    good, and add-to it to make it better (or what you think is better,
    anyway).

    Think about this: Let's say 100,000 people like ubuntu, but would
    prefer it to be more like a hypothetical "Mint-like" distro, somewhat
    flashier and with multimedia already installed.

    Scenario 1: Each of those 100,000 people spends an hour or so making
    the changes. 100,000 man-hours used.

    Scenario 2: A small team uses, say, 5,000 man-hours to create a new
    distro and make it available to anyone.

    Which scenario is more "wasteful"?


  6. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    JEDIDIAH wrote:

    >On 2008-04-07, Tony Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> The same could be said for many of the Distros out there,
    >> and so much time, effort and skill is going to waste by trying to re-invent
    >> the wheel.

    >
    >(snip)
    >
    > The fact that 10 or 20 separate companies have their own R&D
    >departments fiddling with 100 year old combustion engine technology
    >is a necessary means to an end.
    >
    > Your "concerns" about Linux could just as easily apply to cars.
    >
    > The forks are generally where the progress comes from.


    You make good points, but even you are selling-short the efficiencies
    of OSS.

    For car engines, it is true that things like "pistons" and "camshafts"
    are in the public domain, but it's also true that each company keeps
    new research and technology secret, in order to obtain a competitive
    advantage. How inefficient that multiple companies have redundant R&D
    going-on to achieve the same goal! This is analogous to the
    closed-source world. With OSS, such wasteful redundancies are largely
    eliminated.

    Example: You like Notepad.exe, but it lacks some features that you
    would like. With OSS, you grab the source for Notepad, add to it, and
    you're done! With closed-source, you're starting from scratch, TRULY
    "re-inventing the wheel!"


  7. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    On 2008-04-09, chrisv wrote:
    > JEDIDIAH wrote:
    >
    >>On 2008-04-07, Tony Smith wrote:
    >>>
    >>> The same could be said for many of the Distros out there,
    >>> and so much time, effort and skill is going to waste by trying to re-invent
    >>> the wheel.

    >>
    >>(snip)
    >>
    >> The fact that 10 or 20 separate companies have their own R&D
    >>departments fiddling with 100 year old combustion engine technology
    >>is a necessary means to an end.
    >>
    >> Your "concerns" about Linux could just as easily apply to cars.
    >>
    >> The forks are generally where the progress comes from.

    >
    > You make good points, but even you are selling-short the efficiencies
    > of OSS.


    Free software is a market response to the problem of how monopolies
    are prone to get entrenched with software producrts with no standardized
    interfaces. It is a likely (and probably inevitable) response of the
    unregulated market to address all it's customers. When there aren't
    exit barriers for the customers, the benefits of Free software are
    less dramatic.

    You see this to a lesser degree with cars even. The main market
    is healthy enough that it won't trigger the automotive equivalent of
    a free softwrae movement.

    >
    > For car engines, it is true that things like "pistons" and "camshafts"
    > are in the public domain, but it's also true that each company keeps
    > new research and technology secret, in order to obtain a competitive
    > advantage. How inefficient that multiple companies have redundant R&D
    > going-on to achieve the same goal! This is analogous to the
    > closed-source world. With OSS, such wasteful redundancies are largely
    > eliminated.
    >
    > Example: You like Notepad.exe, but it lacks some features that you
    > would like. With OSS, you grab the source for Notepad, add to it, and
    > you're done! With closed-source, you're starting from scratch, TRULY
    > "re-inventing the wheel!"


    Engineering costs are amortized over all users, so this isn't
    really that compelling of an argument. This also makes it more
    feasable for the existence of multiple similar tools.

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  8. Re: [News] Ubuntu GNU/Linux Too Easy to Set Up, New Release Promising

    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Apr 2008 15:57:10 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >> Ubuntu experiments in dynamic world

    >
    > Yea.
    > It's dynamic alright!
    >
    > The Ubuntu group has 62 pages worth of Ubuntu crashes, freezes up, locks up
    > etc on it's users.
    >
    > Great "dynamic" product you have there Roy.
    >
    > http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.p...ghlight=freeze
    >
    >

    Works great on every pc i have installed it on.... Love it!


    oz

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