Microsoft shows Django running on IronPython

,----[ Quote ]
| This is a huge step for the team, to be able to run a widely-used framework,
| such as Django, on a dynamic language running on the .NET Framework. Django
| is a mature web application framework written for Python and intended to
| create applications very fast with a clean and pragmatic design. It is a
| framework developers normally use on Linux or some other platform where
| Apache and Python are found but this demo showed Django running on
| Microsoft's DLR, the IronPython language and SQL Server 2005.
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http://www.infoq.com/news/2008/03/django-and-ironpython

Microsoft: More Open, More Barriers

,----[ Quote ]
| As some of the attendees of the Microsoft Technology Summit have noted,
| Microsoft is making some genuine, good faith efforts to evolve its attitude
| about and work more effectively with open source. From Apache to Eclipse to
| Mozilla, Microsoft is working - and working effectively, by most accounts -
| with some of the more important open source projects on the planet. Projects,
| notably, that in every case compete directly with Microsoft products.
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http://redmonk.com/sogrady/2008/03/2...more-barriers/

It's done to improve them for Windows.


Related and recent:

Microsoft Partnerships, Open Source Software ISVs, and Culture and History

,----[ Quote ]
| Last week, Mary Jo Foley offered commentary on Microsoft's open source
| software strategy with respect to independent software vendors based on an
| interview with Microsoft's Sam Ramji. Matt Asay provides good colour
| commentary on his blog. Each post focuses on the trustworthiness and
| competitive history of the company. Let's look at things from a different
| perspective. Â* Â*
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http://stephesblog.blogs.com/my_webl...oft-partn.html


Microsoft’s open-source strategy: A picture is worth a thousand words

,----[ Quote ]
| Microsoft is looking at open-source software (OSS) as just another flavor of
| independent software vendors (ISV) software. Microsoft’s goal is to convince
| OSS vendors to port their software to Windows. But Microsoft doesn’t want OSS
| software to just sit on top of Windows; the company wants this software to be
| tied into the Windows ecosystem by integrating with Active Directory,
| Microsoft Office, Expression designer tools, System Center systems-management
| wares and SQL Server database. Â* Â* Â*
|
| In cases where customers and software vendors want/need Linux to still be
| part of the picture for some reason, Microsoft will suggest they use Hyper-V,
| its forthcoming virtualization hypervisor, to run Linux and Linux-dependent
| applications. Â* Â*
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http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=1142