[News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux - Linux ; What is Linux and how does it work? ,----[ Quote ] | This year, he predicts, between 20 and 25 per cent of user expenditures | allocated to Linux will be for mission-critical applications. `---- http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/eeebcc46-f...077b07658.html Open source’s green claims ...

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Thread: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

  1. [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    What is Linux and how does it work?

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | This year, he predicts, between 20 and 25 per cent of user expenditures
    | allocated to Linux will be for mission-critical applications.
    `----

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/eeebcc46-f...077b07658.html

    Open source’s green claims

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Alongside server consolidation, GNU/Linux and virtualisation are driving the
    | Web 2.0 trend, which sees businesses using the internet to interact with
    | customers and the wider public.
    `----

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/b42679a0-f...0779fd2ac.html


    Related:

    Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the Linux
    | operating system has been slow to penetrate – particularly in enterprise
    | workgroups. *
    `----

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1


    A gutsy new Linux system

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | As part of the installation process, the software checks that your hardware
    | is adequate – although, as with other versions of Linux, Ubuntu’s
    | requirements are minimal. You will need 256Mb of memory and 4Gb of free hard
    | drive space. *
    `----

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/988034e6-7...nclick_check=1

  2. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Coverand Praise GNU/Linux

    Roy Schestowitz wrote:

    > Related:
    >
    > Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    > | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the Linux
    > | operating system has been slow to penetrate – particularly in enterprise
    > | workgroups.
    > `----
    >
    > http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1


    My experience is that the CIO has to have a "real" companies supporting
    "their code". Seems like he wants a scapegoat top go after if it flubs,
    even if it is internal IT's fault. For this they are willing to pay
    extra for.

  3. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    ____/ Philip on Wednesday 19 March 2008 20:40 : \____

    > Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >
    >> Related:
    >>
    >> Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops
    >>
    >> ,----[ Quote ]
    >> | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the Linux
    >> | operating system has been slow to penetrate – particularly in enterprise
    >> | workgroups.
    >> `----
    >>
    >>

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1
    >
    > My experience is that the CIO has to have a "real" companies supporting
    > "their code". Seems like he wants a scapegoat top go after if it flubs,
    > even if it is internal IT's fault. For this they are willing to pay
    > extra for.


    Yes, but it's a myth. They just need to read the Windows EULA and other similar
    EULAs of Microsoft products.

    By the way, more articles about Linux keep coming from the Financial Times
    (just spotted more). What on earth of going on? :-)

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | http://debian.org
    http://Schestowitz.com | GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Mem: 515500k total, 470440k used, 45060k free, 704k buffers
    http://iuron.com - next generation of search paradigms

  4. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    > ____/ Philip on Wednesday 19 March 2008 20:40 : \____
    >
    >> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>
    >>> Related:
    >>>
    >>> Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops
    >>>
    >>> ,----[ Quote ]
    >>> | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the Linux
    >>> | operating system has been slow to penetrate ? particularly in enterprise
    >>> | workgroups.
    >>> `----
    >>>
    >>>

    > http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1
    >>
    >> My experience is that the CIO has to have a "real" companies supporting
    >> "their code". Seems like he wants a scapegoat top go after if it flubs,
    >> even if it is internal IT's fault. For this they are willing to pay
    >> extra for.

    >
    > Yes, but it's a myth. They just need to read the Windows EULA and other similar
    > EULAs of Microsoft products.
    >
    > By the way, more articles about Linux keep coming from the Financial Times
    > (just spotted more). What on earth of going on? :-)
    >


    I have a slide I use for this, it's essentially the "cost of blame".
    Politics in large organisations is based to a great extent about being
    able to blame someone else when there is a problem.

    There is a big fat business opportunity there *now* for companies to
    start offering openoffice.org support, they will be able to rake in the
    "blame" cost from their customers, and both the customer and they will
    benefit from being on open platforms, where the customer owns their data
    and services.

    --
    | mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | Open platforms prevent vendor lock-in. Own your Own services! |


  5. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    ____/ Mark Kent on Thursday 20 March 2008 11:52 : \____

    > Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    >> ____/ Philip on Wednesday 19 March 2008 20:40 : \____
    >>
    >>> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Related:
    >>>>
    >>>> Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops
    >>>>
    >>>> ,----[ Quote ]
    >>>> | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the
    >>>> | Linux operating system has been slow to penetrate ? particularly in
    >>>> | enterprise workgroups.
    >>>> `----
    >>>>
    >>>>

    >>

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1
    >>>
    >>> My experience is that the CIO has to have a "real" companies supporting
    >>> "their code". Seems like he wants a scapegoat top go after if it flubs,
    >>> even if it is internal IT's fault. For this they are willing to pay
    >>> extra for.

    >>
    >> Yes, but it's a myth. They just need to read the Windows EULA and other
    >> similar EULAs of Microsoft products.
    >>
    >> By the way, more articles about Linux keep coming from the Financial Times
    >> (just spotted more). What on earth of going on? :-)


    s/of/is/

    > I have a slide I use for this, it's essentially the "cost of blame".
    > Politics in large organisations is based to a great extent about being
    > able to blame someone else when there is a problem.
    >
    > There is a big fat business opportunity there *now* for companies to
    > start offering openoffice.org support, they will be able to rake in the
    > "blame" cost from their customers, and both the customer and they will
    > benefit from being on open platforms, where the customer owns their data
    > and services.


    I saw it a while ago (can't remember well and the context). A manager openly
    said in an article that he needs someone to blame/sue in case something goes
    wrong. Apparently that is now a selection criterion for software.

    "Can I sue?" [clue: look at the Windows EULA]


    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | http://debian.org
    http://Schestowitz.com | Free as in Free Beer | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Cpu(s): 26.1%us, 4.0%sy, 1.0%ni, 65.3%id, 3.2%wa, 0.3%hi, 0.2%si, 0.0%st
    http://iuron.com - semantic engine to gather information

  6. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    > ____/ Mark Kent on Thursday 20 March 2008 11:52 : \____
    >
    >> Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    >>> ____/ Philip on Wednesday 19 March 2008 20:40 : \____
    >>>
    >>>> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Related:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Did IT work: Putting Linux on desktops
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ,----[ Quote ]
    >>>>> | While Linux servers are now commonplace, the desktop version of the
    >>>>> | Linux operating system has been slow to penetrate ? particularly in
    >>>>> | enterprise workgroups.
    >>>>> `----
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>

    > http://www.ft.com/cms/s/d637fe7a-8c9...nclick_check=1
    >>>>
    >>>> My experience is that the CIO has to have a "real" companies supporting
    >>>> "their code". Seems like he wants a scapegoat top go after if it flubs,
    >>>> even if it is internal IT's fault. For this they are willing to pay
    >>>> extra for.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, but it's a myth. They just need to read the Windows EULA and other
    >>> similar EULAs of Microsoft products.
    >>>
    >>> By the way, more articles about Linux keep coming from the Financial Times
    >>> (just spotted more). What on earth of going on? :-)

    >
    > s/of/is/
    >
    >> I have a slide I use for this, it's essentially the "cost of blame".
    >> Politics in large organisations is based to a great extent about being
    >> able to blame someone else when there is a problem.
    >>
    >> There is a big fat business opportunity there *now* for companies to
    >> start offering openoffice.org support, they will be able to rake in the
    >> "blame" cost from their customers, and both the customer and they will
    >> benefit from being on open platforms, where the customer owns their data
    >> and services.

    >
    > I saw it a while ago (can't remember well and the context). A manager openly
    > said in an article that he needs someone to blame/sue in case something goes
    > wrong. Apparently that is now a selection criterion for software.


    Oh, it's been a criterion for as long as I can recall. It's entirely the
    reason why the shilcosystem used to refer to Linux distributions as "DIY"
    and support as "kids in garages" and so on; it was all about giving the
    impression that there'd be nobody to blame when things go wrong (things
    always go wrong, especially when there're vested interests around to
    make sure that even the smallest problem is blown to vast proportion),
    whereas "professional" software has someone to blame. It's about people
    protecting their own careers, rather than any kind of altruistic interest
    in wider corporate success, in the main.

    >
    > "Can I sue?" [clue: look at the Windows EULA]
    >
    >


    A lot of companies use a third-party to manage their desktop
    infrastructure, even if its Windows in Intels. Whilst they might make
    licence payments to Microsoft, they also make Ops & Maintenance (support)
    payments to other companies in order to keep it all going. That means
    that if there are problems, they can take them up with the support
    company. Whilst still paying for their licences, of course.

    --
    | mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | Open platforms prevent vendor lock-in. Own your Own services! |


  7. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Coverand Praise GNU/Linux

    Mark Kent wrote:
    > Roy Schestowitz espoused:


    >> I saw it a while ago (can't remember well and the context). A
    >> manager openly said in an article that he needs someone to
    >> blame/sue in case something goes wrong. Apparently that is now a
    >> selection criterion for software.

    >
    > Oh, it's been a criterion for as long as I can recall.


    I've heard (urban myth?) that there are some companies that won't use
    free (beer) software because they think there needs to be a non-zero
    figure for procurement accounts of all inventory, since otherwise it's
    classed as corporate gifts or promotional material, and causes problems
    with tax and liability accounting. How much of that is real, and how
    much is just bull****, I have no idea.

    Then there was the Russian who posted to the Fedora mailing list last
    year, about problems he was having with the local authorities, who
    insisted he provide them with receipts for his *Free Software* (i.e.
    Fedora; OpenOffice, etc.). IIRC someone on the list suggested he simply
    print out a copy of the GPL. I never saw a follow up of how that turned out.

    It's quite amusing to see how much difficulty simple concepts such as
    Freedom causes some people who are stuck in the dark ages. Then again,
    given the mentality of some decision makers (such as the ATO CIO exposed
    this week), it shouldn't surprise me how backward they can be.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | 'When it comes to knowledge, "ownership" just doesn't make sense'
    | ~ Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. http://tinyurl.com/22bgx8
    `----

    Fedora release 8 (Werewolf) on sky, running kernel 2.6.23.8-63.fc8
    00:49:25 up 97 days, 22:25, 5 users, load average: 0.02, 0.01, 0.03

  8. Re: [News] A Couple of New Articles in The Financial Times Cover and Praise GNU/Linux

    ____/ [H]omer on Friday 28 March 2008 00:49 : \____

    > Mark Kent wrote:
    >> Roy Schestowitz espoused:

    >
    >>> I saw it a while ago (can't remember well and the context). A
    >>> manager openly said in an article that he needs someone to
    >>> blame/sue in case something goes wrong. Apparently that is now a
    >>> selection criterion for software.

    >>
    >> Oh, it's been a criterion for as long as I can recall.

    >
    > I've heard (urban myth?) that there are some companies that won't use
    > free (beer) software because they think there needs to be a non-zero
    > figure for procurement accounts of all inventory, since otherwise it's
    > classed as corporate gifts or promotional material, and causes problems
    > with tax and liability accounting. How much of that is real, and how
    > much is just bull****, I have no idea.
    >
    > Then there was the Russian who posted to the Fedora mailing list last
    > year, about problems he was having with the local authorities, who
    > insisted he provide them with receipts for his *Free Software* (i.e.
    > Fedora; OpenOffice, etc.). IIRC someone on the list suggested he simply
    > print out a copy of the GPL. I never saw a follow up of how that turned out.
    >
    > It's quite amusing to see how much difficulty simple concepts such as
    > Freedom causes some people who are stuck in the dark ages. Then again,
    > given the mentality of some decision makers (such as the ATO CIO exposed
    > this week), it shouldn't surprise me how backward they can be.


    Here it is for the record:

    Legality of Fedora in production environment

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Recently the appropriate laws in my country (Russia) have beens
    | ignificantly toughened. Now the police can check for illegal software
    | usage by their own initiative (without request from the owner). The
    | tax inspection demands that software should be registered at
    | accounts departments.
    |
    | During such a checking, the user is obliged now to show all hardcopy
    | license documents (with original signatures and stamps).
    `----

    http://www.redhat.com/archives/fedor.../msg00697.html


    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | No Makefile, no business
    http://Schestowitz.com | GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Swap: 1510068k total, 153824k used, 1356244k free, 70048k cached
    http://iuron.com - next generation of search paradigms

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