Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free? - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free? - Linux ; On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 07:13:04 -0700, TheLetterK wrote (in article ): > George Graves wrote: >> On Mon, 3 Sep 2007 15:39:40 -0700, mycarisfast@yahoo.com wrote >> (in article ): >> >>> Linux? >>> Why? >>> Does my college support ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free?

  1. Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free?

    On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 07:13:04 -0700, TheLetterK wrote
    (in article ):

    > George Graves wrote:
    >> On Mon, 3 Sep 2007 15:39:40 -0700, mycarisfast@yahoo.com wrote
    >> (in article <1188859180.043173.320040@22g2000hsm.googlegroups.c om>):
    >>
    >>> Linux?
    >>> Why?
    >>> Does my college support Linux?
    >>> No.
    >>> Does my Church support Linux for their online ministry?
    >>> No.
    >>> Does my stock broker support Linux?
    >>> No.
    >>> Does my trading program support Linux?
    >>> No.
    >>> Does my Logitech Quickcam 5000 support Linux?
    >>> No.
    >>>
    >>> So why Linux?
    >>>
    >>> Why on earth would I wish to be the square peg in the round hole?
    >>> Everyone else I know is using either Windows or Mac.
    >>> Why would I want to use Linux?
    >>>
    >>> FWIW I have tried Linux, Ubuntu, and I found it to be of very poor
    >>> quality.
    >>> The applications lack help systems and frankly they look like ****.
    >>>
    >>> So why Linux?
    >>> My time isn't free BTW.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I think that I can, at least partially, address this.
    >>
    >> There seem to be two types of people who are drawn to Linux:

    >
    > You are discussing only home users, I hope?


    Well, fairly obviously, yes.

    >> The hobbyist and
    >> the cheapskate. Both of these personality types are somewhat inexplicable
    >> (at
    >> least as far as motivation is concerned) but their attitudes are pretty
    >> straightforward.
    >>
    >> The hobbyist mentality (any hobby) is very strange, yet very human. Hobbies
    >> are designed to be engaging pastimes which relax the hobbyist by taking him
    >> away from the real world. Whether this be via standing in a stream flicking
    >> a
    >> fly rod, building RC model airplanes, fiddling almost neurotically with an
    >> expensive stereo system, or playing with computers, the higher the "play"
    >> component in the hobby, the more engaging it seems to be to those drawn to
    >> it. Both Windows and especially the Mac are designed as tools and as such
    >> their "job" is to get out of the way of productivity by the user.

    >
    > Neither platform does as good a job at this as GNU/Linux can. Which is
    > why I prefer doing real work on GNU/Linux.


    Now that's a matter of opinion that I'm sure you'll get a lot of argument
    about. I can't comment, because I don't use Linux, but I will say that I've
    heard Linux supporters claim a lot of things about the platform, but this is
    the first time I've heard any suggestion that Linux "gets out of the user's
    way" using any GUI shell!

    I've snipped the rest of your comments as I have nothing to say about them.
    You have your reasons for running Linux, other people have different
    motivations, and I choose to use a platform that is fun to use and has the
    standard, "shrink-wrapped" apps I need to do the work I do, I.E., the Mac. If
    there were another platform with those characteristics, I'd likely use it,
    but for the here and now, its the Mac.


  2. Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free?

    George Graves wrote:

    > On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 07:13:04 -0700, TheLetterK wrote
    > (in article ):
    >
    >> George Graves wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 3 Sep 2007 15:39:40 -0700, mycarisfast@yahoo.com wrote
    >>> (in article <1188859180.043173.320040@22g2000hsm.googlegroups.c om>):
    >>>
    >>>> Linux?
    >>>> Why?
    >>>> Does my college support Linux?
    >>>> No.
    >>>> Does my Church support Linux for their online ministry?
    >>>> No.
    >>>> Does my stock broker support Linux?
    >>>> No.
    >>>> Does my trading program support Linux?
    >>>> No.
    >>>> Does my Logitech Quickcam 5000 support Linux?
    >>>> No.
    >>>>
    >>>> So why Linux?
    >>>>
    >>>> Why on earth would I wish to be the square peg in the round hole?
    >>>> Everyone else I know is using either Windows or Mac.
    >>>> Why would I want to use Linux?
    >>>>
    >>>> FWIW I have tried Linux, Ubuntu, and I found it to be of very poor
    >>>> quality.
    >>>> The applications lack help systems and frankly they look like ****.
    >>>>
    >>>> So why Linux?
    >>>> My time isn't free BTW.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I think that I can, at least partially, address this.
    >>>
    >>> There seem to be two types of people who are drawn to Linux:

    >>
    >> You are discussing only home users, I hope?

    >
    > Well, fairly obviously, yes.
    >
    >>> The hobbyist and
    >>> the cheapskate. Both of these personality types are somewhat
    >>> inexplicable (at
    >>> least as far as motivation is concerned) but their attitudes are pretty
    >>> straightforward.
    >>>
    >>> The hobbyist mentality (any hobby) is very strange, yet very human.
    >>> Hobbies are designed to be engaging pastimes which relax the hobbyist by
    >>> taking him away from the real world. Whether this be via standing in a
    >>> stream flicking a
    >>> fly rod, building RC model airplanes, fiddling almost neurotically with
    >>> an expensive stereo system, or playing with computers, the higher the
    >>> "play" component in the hobby, the more engaging it seems to be to those
    >>> drawn to it. Both Windows and especially the Mac are designed as tools
    >>> and as such their "job" is to get out of the way of productivity by the
    >>> user.

    >>
    >> Neither platform does as good a job at this as GNU/Linux can. Which is
    >> why I prefer doing real work on GNU/Linux.

    >
    > Now that's a matter of opinion that I'm sure you'll get a lot of argument
    > about. I can't comment, because I don't use Linux, but I will say that
    > I've heard Linux supporters claim a lot of things about the platform, but
    > this is the first time I've heard any suggestion that Linux "gets out of
    > the user's way" using any GUI shell!
    >
    > I've snipped the rest of your comments as I have nothing to say about
    > them. You have your reasons for running Linux, other people have different
    > motivations, and I choose to use a platform that is fun to use and has the
    > standard, "shrink-wrapped" apps I need to do the work I do, I.E., the Mac.
    > If there were another platform with those characteristics, I'd likely use
    > it, but for the here and now, its the Mac.


    Good for you.
    As you yourself admit, you have about as much knowledge about linux as some
    arbitrary cow has about quantum physics. Which would probably be true for
    most Mac users, as those tend to be rather simple minded and more after
    the "glitz" of their preferred platform, less after the functionality
    (always following the lofty "Steve standard": "why do it simple, rational
    and straightforward, when you can do it the Mac way")

    Can we hope now that you will post your Mac garbage in non-linux groups
    starting from now?
    --
    Law of Probable Dispersal:
    Whatever it is that hits the fan will not be evenly distributed.


  3. Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free?

    "Peter Köhlmann" stated in post
    fcpeed$mkt$03$1@news.t-online.com on 9/18/07 2:03 PM:

    >> Now that's a matter of opinion that I'm sure you'll get a lot of argument
    >> about. I can't comment, because I don't use Linux, but I will say that
    >> I've heard Linux supporters claim a lot of things about the platform, but
    >> this is the first time I've heard any suggestion that Linux "gets out of
    >> the user's way" using any GUI shell!
    >>
    >> I've snipped the rest of your comments as I have nothing to say about
    >> them. You have your reasons for running Linux, other people have different
    >> motivations, and I choose to use a platform that is fun to use and has the
    >> standard, "shrink-wrapped" apps I need to do the work I do, I.E., the Mac.
    >> If there were another platform with those characteristics, I'd likely use
    >> it, but for the here and now, its the Mac.

    >
    > Good for you.
    > As you yourself admit, you have about as much knowledge about linux as some
    > arbitrary cow has about quantum physics. Which would probably be true for
    > most Mac users, as those tend to be rather simple minded and more after
    > the "glitz" of their preferred platform, less after the functionality
    > (always following the lofty "Steve standard": "why do it simple, rational
    > and straightforward, when you can do it the Mac way")


    I have *never* heard a Mac user state anything similar to what you just
    wrote. You know as much about OS X as your above listed cow might.

    > Can we hope now that you will post your Mac garbage in non-linux groups
    > starting from now?


    Will you stop posting to CSMA?


    --
    "Innovation is not about saying yes to everything. It's about saying NO to
    all but the most crucial features." -- Steve Jobs




  4. Re: Linux is Free....So what? Is your Time Free?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Tue, 18 Sep 2007 14:15:18 -0700
    :
    > "Peter Köhlmann" stated in post
    > fcpeed$mkt$03$1@news.t-online.com on 9/18/07 2:03 PM:
    >
    >>> Now that's a matter of opinion that I'm sure you'll get a lot of argument
    >>> about. I can't comment, because I don't use Linux, but I will say that
    >>> I've heard Linux supporters claim a lot of things about the platform, but
    >>> this is the first time I've heard any suggestion that Linux "gets out of
    >>> the user's way" using any GUI shell!
    >>>
    >>> I've snipped the rest of your comments as I have nothing to say about
    >>> them. You have your reasons for running Linux, other people have different
    >>> motivations, and I choose to use a platform that is fun to use and has the
    >>> standard, "shrink-wrapped" apps I need to do the work I do, I.E., the Mac.
    >>> If there were another platform with those characteristics, I'd likely use
    >>> it, but for the here and now, its the Mac.

    >>
    >> Good for you.
    >> As you yourself admit, you have about as much knowledge about linux as some
    >> arbitrary cow has about quantum physics. Which would probably be true for
    >> most Mac users, as those tend to be rather simple minded and more after
    >> the "glitz" of their preferred platform, less after the functionality
    >> (always following the lofty "Steve standard": "why do it simple, rational
    >> and straightforward, when you can do it the Mac way")

    >
    > I have *never* heard a Mac user state anything similar to what you just
    > wrote. You know as much about OS X as your above listed cow might.


    It may indeed be more complicated internally...but who
    the bloody hell cares about internals except those that
    maintain them?

    Of course ideally it would be simpler, but never mind;
    there's a number of coding differences between a
    now-ancient, hypothetical CLI-based program that prompts:

    Command: new
    Name? John Q. Public
    Rank? Private
    Serial Number? 000-00-0000
    Sex? M
    Age? 19
    Start of service? 2007-01-01
    Settings are [John Q. Public, Private, 000-00-0000, M, 19, 2007-01-01]
    Correct? y
    000-00-0000 entered in database.
    Command:

    a screen-based text program that opens a window and
    presents a form, which the user can fill out in any order,
    by using TAB (the cursor shows the field into which the
    clerk is typing):

    Name: ______________
    Rank: Private v
    Serial Number: 000-00-0000
    Sex: [M]/ F
    Age: __
    Start of service: 2007-01-01
    [Enter] [Cancel]

    a custom graphical affair (one could use a Java applet a
    Flash file, or even a SVG file) with far fancier fonts,
    some graphical display capabilities (icons, background
    pictures, semitransparency, various other effects), and
    the ability for the clerk to use a pointer and a blinking
    "i-beam" cursor to indicate which field to type into, and
    a standard affair using HTML, which would structure the
    problem as a standard-fat-client (browser) and a server
    accepting the form, translating it into a URL:

    ..../newprivate.jsp?name=John+Q.+Public&rank=private&serial=000-00-0000&
    sex=m&age=19&start=2007-01-01

    or a POST request.

    Presumably, MacOSX includes many services that make
    drag-and-drop transparent to any application. Instead of
    printing to a file (a pseudo-printer in both Linux and
    Windows can generate such, or one can run an explicit
    converter) and then including the file in an emailer
    application (with the muckiness of fiddling with a file
    requester), one might simply generate an icon which
    represents the print action (that icon might contain
    some coded info), and then drag and drop that icon to
    the application that wants the printout. Presto--instant
    inclusion/transfer.

    Or the email application could simply take the last job
    from a pseudo-printer device queue. I don't know how
    MacOSX does it; I'm not a user thereof.

    I'm not sure what window (if any) would hold the icon
    admittedly, and whether the icon would be represented
    by some sort of a stub file, property attachment, or a
    desktop datastructure maintained by whoever redraws the
    root window, but for most users that's a technical detail
    -- MacOSX just works.

    X has some support for this notion, though I've forgotten
    the details offhand. Basically, a program has to get
    ownership of the select token; the user can then drag an
    icon -- provided by the program holding the token -- onto
    another application, which sees a synthetic drop event.
    Most of that is also technical details, of course.

    KDE and Gnome? I'd have to look.

    [rest snipped]

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Conventional memory has to be one of the most UNconventional
    architectures I've seen in a computer system.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


+ Reply to Thread