Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores - Linux

This is a discussion on Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores - Linux ; In article , Rich wrote: > >going but no one ever thought of putting this in a bundle and click here to Think of Linux as the manual transmission of the desktop. You need to spend a little time learning ...

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Thread: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

  1. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    In article ,
    Rich wrote:
    >
    >going but no one ever thought of putting this in a bundle and click here to


    Think of Linux as the manual transmission of the desktop. You need
    to spend a little time learning how to start it without stalling but once
    you get the idea you'll never have to wait for some dumb piece of machinery
    to downshift so you can merge from an on-ramp.

    Personally, I think that if Ghu, the great, had meant us to drive
    automatics we'd have been born with one foot.




  2. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores


    "Matt" wrote in message
    news:MSwBj.5909$7d1.2067@news01.roc.ny...
    > Andy wrote:
    >> http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h...zQxvgD8VAQTSG0
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >> To test demand for systems with the open-source operating system,
    >> Wal-Mart stocked the $199 "Green gPC," made by Everex of Taiwan, in about
    >> 600 stores starting late in October.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If Wal-Mart is still selling any machines in that price range, they aren't
    > running Vista, which means that Linux will get another crack at those
    > machines when XP support ends.


    Why would you think that is so? Vista Home is the same price, apparently,
    as XP Home for the OEMs and will work just fine on the same hardware. It
    doesn't offer much of any advantage, but it is for sale and works as before.
    Current Walmart advertising seems to offer Vista machines across the board.

    Rather than hypothesizing or trying to derive an answer, it is a lot easier
    and more accurate to just look it up.



  3. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    In article <1r6rzh0c05kt0.6wceh671381n$.dlg@40tude.net>,
    Moshe Goldfarb wrote:
    >
    >People don't want to *build* a computer, at least not most people.
    >


    There's nothing inherent to Unix that requires you to build a
    computer.

    Interestingly enough, one of the first sites I ever ran was a
    Unix site, a couple of Vaxen and about 200 serial lines out to terminals
    on the desktops. Even the secretaries used Unix, wrote their memos in
    Emacs and used mailx instead of some fancy graphical client. Office ran
    just fine, too.

    To repeat an analogy: some people think they need cushy seats,
    ABS, traction control, electric windows, and an engine control system that
    takes a rocket scientist to troubleshoot. But the essence of the experience
    is four wheels, a clutch, and a few hundred horses under the hood.

    Although quad carbs is an acceptable complexity.


  4. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores


    "DFS" wrote in message
    news:sKwBj.2266$9O.944@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
    >
    > I smell MS bribery at work here, 'cause everyone really wants Linux (700
    > cola "advocates" told me so).
    >

    I think you miscounted. There are nowhere near 700 Linux advocates in COLA.
    You are about two orders of magnitude too high. You may have been misled by
    the 7 COLA advocates posting their same nonsense 100 times each.


  5. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores


    "Rich" wrote in message
    news:%23pCxvN5gIHA.4692@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> The truth is, average people are just not interested in Linux.
    >>

    > Were interested but not in going back 15 years to the command prompt to
    > type in arcane lines of code! I tried Umbutu and after 3 evenings of
    > cutting and pasting from the forums I got wireless networking going. Then
    > I discovered that I couldn't play an MP3 but could play a DVD. Had to
    > install a few players to get a simple MP3 to play and have control of FF
    > and the things that Winamp does with ease. I couldn't set a play list or
    > shuffle. Then I tried to look at my other window machines to share files
    > etc. WOW was that fun mounting and un-mounting drives etc....enough back
    > to windows and clicking to get most things done!
    >

    I had a much better experience with installing Ubuntu (not Umbutu, notice,
    but it is easy to get it wrong) although I do now remember that the MP3
    wouldn't play right out of the chute. I had to OK the download of a
    "codec", as it were, before the thing would play, but it was a sort of
    automatic activity. That was another think that I wonder why they didn't
    just do it to begin with rather than have you go around Robin Hood's barn to
    do things that everyone would be likely to do. Then I noticed that MP3
    playing is, at least theoretically, blocked by patents held by Phillips and
    others, although they seem to be in dispute. Microsoft has a license to use
    the technology and so WMP works out of the box. If Ubuntu did that, I guess
    they are worried about being sued by Philips or the others. Or else maybe
    Richard Stallman would call them impure and have them stoned.

    So you have to sort of pirate MP3 technology on your own.

    My experience with the built in HP wireless was that it worked on its own
    pretty much intuitively, as did the network discovery and sharing with my XP
    workstation, Vista workstations, and Win2K8 server.

    The main thing, though, is that it doesn't do anything noticeably better
    than Windows and I cannot find anything that might make someone want to
    switch to it. Since operations are annoyingly different from Windows, there
    is always a certain amount of inefficiency in selecting things, too, and
    that might make a new user tend to switch back since there is nothing to
    hold his interest.


  6. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores


    "Moshe Goldfarb" wrote in message
    newso6kv0n4s6bn.1a6m6d8l0vvwa$.dlg@40tude.net...
    >
    > Linux advocates need to stop the denial and start figuring out what is
    > wrong with Linux that is keeping it at so low a desktop market share.
    >

    That is pretty much a search for a Holy Grail, i.e. something that is
    mythical and doesn't really exist. It is a fruitless exercise that is often
    taken by fanatics and never results in any achievement. A lot of wasted
    effort.

    Anyone with a really compelling idea is either smart enough to take
    advantage of such a winner or would be so stupid as to lose control of the
    idea to someone who would take advantage. There is no likelyhood that Linux
    would profit from any such thing ever, ergo it is doomed to sit where it is
    at, i.e. a sort of generic Unix clone with the ability to serve as a Unix
    replacement in a wide range of applications, Windows desktop
    clients/workstations not being one of them.

    Rather than wasting all this time on such an ill fated mission, the Linux
    desktop advocacy forces should put their minds to figuring out how to really
    help the presumed hordes of Windows users who have difficulty with features,
    stability, malware, or whatever shortcoming that the Linux advocates see in
    the use of the status quo Windows. If they fixed real problems with Windows
    using their assumed superior intellects and incisive understanding of
    things, the Windows users would be very pleased and many would gladly even
    pay for the benefits obtained from this service to their needs. That is a
    much more fruitful course of action than trying to get them to venture out
    into unknown territory and berating their intelligence at every step. The
    so-called "Win-dopes" are to be assisted not abused as Linux advocates seem
    to delight in doing now.


  7. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    Bob Campbell wrote:

    >But as always, you get what you pay for.


    Really? Then why is Windows Visduh so ****ty?


  8. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    > Fsckwitted troll wrote:
    >>
    >> Linux advocates need to stop the denial and start figuring out what is
    >> wrong with Linux that is keeping it at so low a desktop market share.


    Fsckwitted troll needs to stop claiming that Linux "low desktop market
    share" is the result of something being "wrong" with it. Fsckwitted
    trolls has had the reasons explained to him countless times.
    Fsckwitted troll should FOAD, and the world would be a better place.


  9. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    Andy wrote:
    > http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h...zQxvgD8VAQTSG0
    >
    >
    >
    > NEW YORK (AP) Computers that run the Linux operating system instead of
    > Microsoft Corp.'s Windows didn't attract enough attention from Wal-Mart
    > customers, and the chain has stopped selling them in stores, a
    > spokeswoman said Monday.
    >
    > "This really wasn't what our customers were looking for," said Wal-Mart
    > Stores Inc. spokeswoman Melissa O'Brien.
    >
    > To test demand for systems with the open-source operating system,
    > Wal-Mart stocked the $199 "Green gPC," made by Everex of Taiwan, in
    > about 600 stores starting late in October.
    >
    >

    [quote}
    Paul Kim, brand manager for Everex, said selling the gPC online was
    "significantly more effective" than selling it in stores.
    [/quote]
    --
    Rick

  10. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 18:58:23 +0100,
    Hadron wrote:
    > Matt writes:
    >
    >> Hadron wrote:
    >>> Matt writes:
    >>>
    >>>> Andy wrote:
    >>>>> http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h...zQxvgD8VAQTSG0
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> To test demand for systems with the open-source operating system,
    >>>>> Wal-Mart stocked the $199 "Green gPC," made by Everex of Taiwan, in
    >>>>> about 600 stores starting late in October.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> If Wal-Mart is still selling any machines in that price range, they
    >>>> aren't running Vista, which means that Linux will get another crack at
    >>>> those machines when XP support ends.
    >>>
    >>> Do read the article and come back with something that make some sense
    >>> and is relevant. You sound almost like Liarnut with that reply.

    >>
    >> Show that it doesn't make sense or is irrelevant.

    >
    > It's hyperbole and guess work.
    >


    oh! the irony! Hadron of all people, chiding someone else for hyperbole.

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    --
    Jim Richardson http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
    If you think you can tell me what to think,
    I think I will tell you where to go

  11. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    * Rich peremptorily fired off this memo:

    >> The truth is, average people are just not interested in Linux.
    >>

    > Were interested but not in going back 15 years to the command prompt to type
    > in arcane lines of code! I tried Umbutu and after 3 evenings of cutting and
    > pasting from the forums I got wireless networking going. Then I discovered
    > that I couldn't play an MP3 but could play a DVD. Had to install a few
    > players to get a simple MP3 to play and have control of FF and the things
    > that Winamp does with ease. I couldn't set a play list or shuffle. Then I
    > tried to look at my other window machines to share files etc. WOW was that
    > fun mounting and un-mounting drives etc....enough back to windows and
    > clicking to get most things done!


    You're posting from the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron x-ray
    research facility at Argonne National Labs and you can't get "Umbutu" to
    play and shuffle MP3 and automount drives without editing files?

    Surely you know how to navigate menus!

    --
    You see, antiquated ideas of kindness and generosity are simply bugs that
    must be programmed out of our world. And these cold, unfeeling machines will
    show us the way.
    -- Bill Gates

  12. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    * the wharf rat peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > In article ,
    > Rich wrote:
    >>
    >>going but no one ever thought of putting this in a bundle and click here to

    >
    > Think of Linux as the manual transmission of the desktop. You need
    > to spend a little time learning how to start it without stalling but once
    > you get the idea you'll never have to wait for some dumb piece of machinery
    > to downshift so you can merge from an on-ramp.
    >
    > Personally, I think that if Ghu, the great, had meant us to drive
    > automatics we'd have been born with one foot.


    Actually, in large part the state of wireless kernel modules in Linux is
    the fault of the manufacturers.

    Intel had a pretty decent driver with IWL3945, but somebody had to get a
    wild hair about binary blobs and now we have the problematic IWLWIFI
    series. Thanks, Intel.

    --
    We will never make a 32-bit operating system.
    -- Bill Gates, At the launch of MSX[3]

  13. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    * Steven Friel Jr. peremptorily fired off this memo:

    > It doesn't help that when Linux desktops are sold, it is typically installed
    > on the slowest/cheapest/worst computers at the store. Most people, even if
    > they are on a budget, are somewhat value conscious. When buying something
    > like a desktop and shelling out a few hundred bucks, people don't want to
    > buy the cheapest computer on the shelf. They feel better if they spend a
    > 'little more' and get what they perceive as being better quality machine and
    > a overall better value. These machines typically have MS-Windows so what's
    > implied the message here? Could people read the tea-leaves here and conclude
    > that Linux is for the bottom-end cheapo stuff and Windows is more of a
    > high-end upgrade?


    I wonder what they make of Vista, then.

    --
    If people had understood how patents would be granted when most of today's
    ideas were invented, and had taken out patents, the industry would be at a
    complete standstill today.
    -- Bill Gates, Challenges and Strategy Memo (16 May 1991)

  14. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores


    "Linonut" wrote in message
    news:ILBBj.6129$by3.5723@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >* Steven Friel Jr. peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >
    >> It doesn't help that when Linux desktops are sold, it is typically
    >> installed
    >> on the slowest/cheapest/worst computers at the store. Most people, even
    >> if
    >> they are on a budget, are somewhat value conscious. When buying something
    >> like a desktop and shelling out a few hundred bucks, people don't want to
    >> buy the cheapest computer on the shelf. They feel better if they spend a
    >> 'little more' and get what they perceive as being better quality machine
    >> and
    >> a overall better value. These machines typically have MS-Windows so
    >> what's
    >> implied the message here? Could people read the tea-leaves here and
    >> conclude
    >> that Linux is for the bottom-end cheapo stuff and Windows is more of a
    >> high-end upgrade?

    >
    > I wonder what they make of Vista, then.


    I wonder why you left out the best part of my post - "I agree but with some
    reservations. Linux may very well be the best free -product- out there. But
    the public perception has always been what you describe... that you get what
    you pay for."

    Anywho - What do they make of Vista? Dunno. I don't run Vista but I've been
    in those consumer electronic stores and I checked it out. As far as the
    display-demo machines go it ran pretty well. They don't put Vista on the
    1.2Ghz Celeron machines but the machines I tried it on actually ran pretty
    decent.

    The point I'm trying to make and don't take this as a cheap shot against
    Linux is this. Most people don't know that much about computers. They go to
    the store and they are going to be very impressionable based on what they
    see. So they see all the "nice" computers, the expensive top-of-the-line
    computers that come with the big monitors and everything. They see all those
    computers running Windows. But over in the corner by the "bargain closeout
    section" they see a $199 computer running Linux. What are people going to
    think when they see that?

    Or let's use the tired old car analogy but with a twist. Say you know
    nothing about cars or tires. You go car shopping at a bunch of different
    dealerships and all the $600 clunkers in the lot have Goodyear tires. But
    the nice cars, the cars by BMW, Lexus, Benz all have Michelin tires. Most
    people are going to see this and think that Goodyear tires are crap and that
    Michelin tires are superior.

    That's the point I'm getting at. Linux needs to associate itself with
    quality in the eyes and minds of the consumer. If the only place people see
    Linux is on the el-cheapo computers then they're going to make the mental
    association with Linux and inferior systems. I ain't saying it's fair or
    accurate. But it is what it is.


    > --
    > If people had understood how patents would be granted when most of today's
    > ideas were invented, and had taken out patents, the industry would be at a
    > complete standstill today.
    > -- Bill Gates, Challenges and Strategy Memo (16 May 1991)




  15. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 16:51:35 -0400, Steven Friel Jr. wrote:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    > news:ILBBj.6129$by3.5723@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>* Steven Friel Jr. peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> It doesn't help that when Linux desktops are sold, it is typically
    >>> installed
    >>> on the slowest/cheapest/worst computers at the store. Most people,
    >>> even if
    >>> they are on a budget, are somewhat value conscious. When buying
    >>> something like a desktop and shelling out a few hundred bucks, people
    >>> don't want to buy the cheapest computer on the shelf. They feel better
    >>> if they spend a 'little more' and get what they perceive as being
    >>> better quality machine and
    >>> a overall better value. These machines typically have MS-Windows so
    >>> what's
    >>> implied the message here? Could people read the tea-leaves here and
    >>> conclude
    >>> that Linux is for the bottom-end cheapo stuff and Windows is more of a
    >>> high-end upgrade?

    >>
    >> I wonder what they make of Vista, then.

    >
    > I wonder why you left out the best part of my post - "I agree but with
    > some reservations. Linux may very well be the best free -product- out
    > there. But the public perception has always been what you describe...
    > that you get what you pay for."


    And then there's ... If it's free, it's for me.
    (snip)
    --
    Rick

  16. Re: Wal-Mart Ends Test of Linux in Stores

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 16:51:35 -0400, Steven Friel Jr. wrote:

    > "Linonut" wrote in message
    > news:ILBBj.6129$by3.5723@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >>* Steven Friel Jr. peremptorily fired off this memo:
    >>
    >>> It doesn't help that when Linux desktops are sold, it is typically
    >>> installed
    >>> on the slowest/cheapest/worst computers at the store. Most people,
    >>> even if
    >>> they are on a budget, are somewhat value conscious. When buying
    >>> something like a desktop and shelling out a few hundred bucks, people
    >>> don't want to buy the cheapest computer on the shelf. They feel better
    >>> if they spend a 'little more' and get what they perceive as being
    >>> better quality machine and
    >>> a overall better value. These machines typically have MS-Windows so
    >>> what's
    >>> implied the message here? Could people read the tea-leaves here and
    >>> conclude
    >>> that Linux is for the bottom-end cheapo stuff and Windows is more of a
    >>> high-end upgrade?

    >>
    >> I wonder what they make of Vista, then.

    >
    > I wonder why you left out the best part of my post - "I agree but with
    > some reservations. Linux may very well be the best free -product- out
    > there. But the public perception has always been what you describe...
    > that you get what you pay for."
    >
    > Anywho - What do they make of Vista? Dunno. I don't run Vista but I've
    > been in those consumer electronic stores and I checked it out. As far as
    > the display-demo machines go it ran pretty well. They don't put Vista on
    > the 1.2Ghz Celeron machines but the machines I tried it on actually ran
    > pretty decent.
    >
    > The point I'm trying to make and don't take this as a cheap shot against
    > Linux is this. Most people don't know that much about computers. They go
    > to the store and they are going to be very impressionable based on what
    > they see. So they see all the "nice" computers, the expensive
    > top-of-the-line computers that come with the big monitors and
    > everything. They see all those computers running Windows. But over in
    > the corner by the "bargain closeout section" they see a $199 computer
    > running Linux. What are people going to think when they see that?
    >
    > Or let's use the tired old car analogy but with a twist. Say you know
    > nothing about cars or tires. You go car shopping at a bunch of different
    > dealerships and all the $600 clunkers in the lot have Goodyear tires.
    > But the nice cars, the cars by BMW, Lexus, Benz all have Michelin tires.
    > Most people are going to see this and think that Goodyear tires are crap
    > and that Michelin tires are superior.
    >
    > That's the point I'm getting at. Linux needs to associate itself with
    > quality in the eyes and minds of the consumer. If the only place people
    > see Linux is on the el-cheapo computers then they're going to make the
    > mental association with Linux and inferior systems. I ain't saying it's
    > fair or accurate. But it is what it is.
    >
    >
    >> --
    >> If people had understood how patents would be granted when most of
    >> today's ideas were invented, and had taken out patents, the industry
    >> would be at a complete standstill today.
    >> -- Bill Gates, Challenges and Strategy Memo (16 May 1991)


    Let's use the car analogy again. Do you remember those days when the
    Japanese car industry was derided for producing cheap, high volume
    product for a mass market, and how the Ford, GM and the rest were never
    going to lose their dominance of the world car market?

    Now Toyota, Nissan and the rest have trounced them, and it will be the
    same in computing. As we speak, the MS dominance of world computing is
    history.


  17. Re: Who needs wallmart?

    Andy wrote:

    > http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h...zQxvgD8VAQTSG0
    >
    >
    >
    > NEW YORK (AP) ? Computers that run the Linux operating system instead of
    > Microsoft Corp.'s Windows didn't attract enough attention from Wal-Mart
    > customers, and the chain has stopped selling them in stores, a
    > spokeswoman said Monday.
    >
    > "This really wasn't what our customers were looking for," said Wal-Mart
    > Stores Inc. spokeswoman Melissa O'Brien.
    >
    > To test demand for systems with the open-source operating system,
    > Wal-Mart stocked the $199 "Green gPC," made by Everex of Taiwan, in
    > about 600 stores starting late in October.
    >
    >



    Who needs wallmart when Ausus alone is due to ship 5 million Linux EEE PCs?

    Sounds like wallmart isn't run very well.


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