Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor? - Linux

This is a discussion on Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor? - Linux ; Chris Mattern wrote: > On 2008-03-05, Bill Baka wrote: >> The Ghost In The Machine wrote: >>>> No. You were claiming that they're accessing people's computers >>>> at the time, by an included backdoor. And that's obviously nonsense. >> How ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6
Results 101 to 104 of 104

Thread: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

  1. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    Chris Mattern wrote:
    > On 2008-03-05, Bill Baka wrote:
    >> The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >>>> No. You were claiming that they're accessing people's computers
    >>>> at the time, by an included backdoor. And that's obviously nonsense.

    >> How do you know for sure? The government can easily tell them to include
    >> a piece of code for them to use, and if it can be abused the government
    >> will abuse it, Republicans or Democrats.

    >
    > In order to put such a piece of code in a proprietary system, it'd
    > have to pass under the eyes of dozens if not hundreds of programmers
    > who do not owe their sole loyalty to whatever government department
    > decreed it. It would never be kept secret.
    >
    > Open source is even more ridiculous.
    >
    >

    Yep. ~The only way to do that sort of trick is to restrict development
    oto a small company owned by an interested party with some highly paid
    and carefully vetted employees and make sure all your e.g. vote
    rigging^H^H^H^H^Hrecording machines DO have a neat back door. :-)



  2. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    In comp.security.misc plenty900@yahoo.com wrote:
    > I've learned that there are bits of NSA's SELinux in various
    > places in kernel 2.6. How can I be sure that Big Brother isn't
    > using back doors or bugs to break into my computer?


    You can't. You have to trust in people reading the source code detecting
    what's going on.

    > How much safer would it be to just switch back to 2.4 or 2.5?


    I cannot see any safety in it.

    Yours,
    VB.
    --
    The file name of an indirect node file is the string "iNode" immediately
    followed by the link reference converted to decimal text, with no leading
    zeroes. For example, an indirect node file with link reference 123 would
    have the name "iNode123". - HFS Plus Volume Format, MacOS X

  3. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On 2008-03-11, Volker Birk wrote:
    > In comp.security.misc plenty900@yahoo.com wrote:
    >> I've learned that there are bits of NSA's SELinux in various
    >> places in kernel 2.6. How can I be sure that Big Brother isn't
    >> using back doors or bugs to break into my computer?

    >
    > You can't. You have to trust in people reading the source code detecting
    > what's going on.
    >
    >> How much safer would it be to just switch back to 2.4 or 2.5?

    >
    > I cannot see any safety in it.
    >

    Bingo. If you're paranoid, you can see the possibility of being
    pwned by anything (and I'm not saying such paranoia is completely
    wrong). But if you're asking if SELinux makes it more likely,
    the answer has to be no. The risks, like a trojan compiler,
    that have been discussed here are no riskier for SELinux
    than for ealier Linux editions.

    --
    Christopher Mattern

    NOTICE
    Thank you for noticing this new notice
    Your noticing it has been noted
    And will be reported to the authorities

  4. Re: Does kernel 2.6 include an NSA backdoor?

    On Mar 5, 1:06 pm, Moshe Goldfarb wrote:

    > Yea they can and they will, but you can avoid it by being honest.


    Moshe, isn't that a little like saying you can avoid Hitler's wrath
    by being a good Jew who does what Hitler says to do?


+ Reply to Thread
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6