Ever really read a EULA? - Linux

This is a discussion on Ever really read a EULA? - Linux ; There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read but the blue EULA on XP Pro. (We realised that we had left the extra ram at the office and my cohort was driving back to get ...

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Thread: Ever really read a EULA?

  1. Ever really read a EULA?

    There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read but
    the blue EULA on XP Pro. (We realised that we had left the extra ram at
    the office and my cohort was driving back to get it.)

    Anyway, like 99.99...9 percent of all Win installers, I had seen the top
    of that blue screen for years but never read it. Now I had a chance,
    since there was not so much as a calendar to stare at. After reading
    through it three or four times, I came to the following conclusions.

    Unlike some current indecipherable EULAS, this one is fairly
    understandable - to wit...

    1. MS claims all rights to control its use.

    2. MS claims all rights to inspect it at any time.

    3. MS claims all rights to limit any use at any time, including uses that
    haven't been thought of yet.

    4. MS (apparently) insists that nobody connect to it with anything but
    another legal windows OS (and only up to 10 users at once).

    5. You have to contact MS within 30 days of installaton and tell them you
    are using it. (Although this version of Pro doesn't have validation
    function and never calls home).

    6. You may not use this as a commercial server. (Didn't suspect this. Why
    would they care?)

    7. The Internet Gaming paragraph I did not understand, despite several
    readings.

    8. MS can download any DRM, including third party DRM at anytime without
    your notification or approval.

    9. If this product doesn't work, or breaks, all you can do is ask for your
    money back, and only in the first 90 days.



    Now, to compare with Debian's "Eula".

    Debian may be used, altered, changed or reverse engineered, by anybody,
    for any use, on as many machines as you can afford, for free, without
    limits, forever... well, you get the idea. Just remember to reboot it
    every few months to allow the hardware to be checked. (Windows has this
    built in, since it either reboots itself, or is required to be rebooted on
    an irregular schedule - usually about once a day or so.)

    horizon


  2. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    horizon :
    > There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read but
    > the blue EULA on XP Pro. (We realised that we had left the extra ram at
    > the office and my cohort was driving back to get it.)


    Been there, done that. I carry reading material now and actually
    consider MS EULAs to be very educational! If I ever decide to sell a
    closed source proggy, I'll do it that way. Lots and lots of fancy words
    saying "**** you, gimme the cash".

    --
    If you love someone, set them free.
    If they don't come back, then call them up when you're drunk.

    http://www.websterscafe.com

  3. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    Verily I say unto thee, that horizon spake thusly:

    > There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read
    > but the blue EULA on XP Pro.


    Sounds like the start of a Steven King novel.

    > 7. The Internet Gaming paragraph I did not understand, despite
    > several readings.


    Despite the confusing reference to games, it has nothing whatsoever to
    do with gaming. It is, in fact, a privacy statement.

    Maybe this'll help:

    http://slated.org/windows_xp_eula_in_plain_english

    > Now, to compare with Debian's "Eula".
    >
    > Debian may be used, altered, changed or reverse engineered, by
    > anybody, for any use, on as many machines as you can afford, for
    > free, without limits, forever.


    Incredibly, some people actually /pay/ to have /less/ Freedom.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    01:49:17 up 39 days, 44 min, 2 users, load average: 1.36, 1.39, 1.40

  4. Re: Ever really read a EULA?


    >
    > http://slated.org/windows_xp_eula_in_plain_english
    >


    A good link. I wonder why MS doesn't just use the plain English version.
    Maybe because they don't want to make it plain that the purchaser is being
    screwed?

    I really like the part that says...
    "Microsoft is not liable even if they break the terms of this agreement."

    I assume that they would be understanding if I decide to break the terms
    also. (Of course, also assuming that I was dumb enough to use their
    bloatware in the first place).

    horizon


  5. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    ____/ Handover Phist on Monday 17 September 2007 00:51 : \____

    > horizon :
    >> There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read but
    >> the blue EULA on XP Pro. (We realised that we had left the extra ram at
    >> the office and my cohort was driving back to get it.)

    >
    > Been there, done that. I carry reading material now and actually
    > consider MS EULAs to be very educational! If I ever decide to sell a
    > closed source proggy, I'll do it that way. Lots and lots of fancy words
    > saying "**** you, gimme the cash".


    When you have a monopoly, you can write any EULA you want (make it more
    restrictive over time) and still get away with it.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | The most satisfying eXPerience is UNIX
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    run-level 2 2007-09-10 01:53 last=
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine

  6. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    [snips]

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 18:41:53 +0000, horizon wrote:

    > 6. You may not use this as a commercial server. (Didn't suspect this. Why
    > would they care?)


    Because it's a $200 copy of XP, instead of a $900 server version.

  7. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    Verily I say unto thee, that Kelsey Bjarnason spake thusly:
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 18:41:53 +0000, horizon wrote:
    >
    >> 6. You may not use this as a commercial server. (Didn't suspect
    >> this. Why would they care?)

    >
    > Because it's a $200 copy of XP, instead of a $900 server version.


    Yeah, a handful of Registry tweaks and a patched TCP/IP stack are really
    worth the extra 700 dollars.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    23:48:02 up 39 days, 22:42, 2 users, load average: 0.16, 0.22, 0.27

  8. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    [H]omer :
    > Verily I say unto thee, that Kelsey Bjarnason spake thusly:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 18:41:53 +0000, horizon wrote:
    >>
    >>> 6. You may not use this as a commercial server. (Didn't suspect
    >>> this. Why would they care?)

    >>
    >> Because it's a $200 copy of XP, instead of a $900 server version.

    >
    > Yeah, a handful of Registry tweaks and a patched TCP/IP stack are really
    > worth the extra 700 dollars.


    Tossing Apache on there: Priceless.

    --
    On the road, ZIPPY is a pinhead without a purpose, but never without a
    POINT ...

    http://www.websterscafe.com

  9. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    After takin' a swig o' grog, Handover Phist belched out this bit o' wisdom:

    > horizon :
    >> There I was... stuck in a bare maintenance room with nothing to read but
    >> the blue EULA on XP Pro. (We realised that we had left the extra ram at
    >> the office and my cohort was driving back to get it.)

    >
    > Been there, done that. I carry reading material now and actually
    > consider MS EULAs to be very educational! If I ever decide to sell a
    > closed source proggy, I'll do it that way. Lots and lots of fancy words
    > saying "**** you, gimme the cash".


    You'll be making money hand-over-fist, just like DFS!

    --
    Tux rox!

  10. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    horizon wrote:

    >Now, to compare with Debian's "Eula".
    >
    >Debian may be used, altered, changed or reverse engineered, by anybody,
    >for any use, on as many machines as you can afford, for free, without
    >limits, forever...


    Yet the filthy lying trolls claim that Linux' only advantage is that
    it costs nothing to buy.


  11. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Handover Phist

    wrote
    on Tue, 18 Sep 2007 00:11:23 GMT
    :
    > [H]omer :
    >> Verily I say unto thee, that Kelsey Bjarnason spake thusly:
    >>> [snips]
    >>>
    >>> On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 18:41:53 +0000, horizon wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 6. You may not use this as a commercial server.
    >>>> (Didn't suspect this. Why would they care?)
    >>>
    >>> Because it's a $200 copy of XP, instead of
    >>> a $900 server version.

    >>
    >> Yeah, a handful of Registry tweaks and a patched TCP/IP stack
    >> are really worth the extra 700 dollars.

    >
    > Tossing Apache on there: Priceless.
    >


    That would be a bit like mounting a precision
    telescope or mobile missile launcher/defense
    system on a soapbox derby go-kart. :-)

    Might work for light testing, but that's about it.

    (In this analogy, Linux is a caterpillar/multitrack
    drive, with interchangeable wheels. Very weird for those
    not used to it, but very flexible for system builders.
    Mac OSX is a pickup truck, FreeDOS a unicycle, but now
    with a very fat (phat?) tire, FreeBSD an even heavier
    caterpillar/multitrack drive, VMS a mine hauling chassis.
    Not sure what HURD will eventually look like.)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    "Woman? What woman?"

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  12. Re: Ever really read a EULA?

    Verily I say unto thee, that unionpenny@yahoo.com spake thusly:

    > This EULA business is all just a scam, isn't it? Just a flat out
    > fraud.


    IANAL but ... AFAIK consumer law supersedes contract conditions, or IOW
    contractual conditions that violate the law are null and void.

    I'd guess that quite a few EULAs qualify.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "OOXML is a superb standard"
    | - GNU/Linux traitor, Miguel de Icaza.
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    04:02:38 up 41 days, 2:57, 2 users, load average: 0.41, 0.31, 0.24

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