Re: OpenOffice: now Made in China - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: OpenOffice: now Made in China - Linux ; On Sep 10, 2:07 pm, "DFS" wrote: > ray wrote: > > On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 13:33:34 -0400, DFS wrote: > >> Let me know when the OSS "community" develops some innovative new > >> software. > > > ...

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Thread: Re: OpenOffice: now Made in China

  1. Re: OpenOffice: now Made in China

    On Sep 10, 2:07 pm, "DFS" wrote:
    > ray wrote:
    > > On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 13:33:34 -0400, DFS wrote:
    > >> Let me know when the OSS "community" develops some innovative new
    > >> software.

    >
    > > You mean like Netscape?

    >
    > NetScape - courtesy of cola nutcaseRexBallard- was a closed source
    > product until MS put the beatdown on them.


    Netscape was a closed source project led by Marc Andreeson.
    Mosaic was an OSS project led by Marc Andreeson.

    Netscape hired many Mosaic contributors, and offered jobs to nearly
    all of them. Many, including myself, had other interests, and chose to
    decline their offer. Netscape offered twice.

    When AOL purchased Netscape, they initially planned to compete toe to
    toe with IE against Microsoft/MSN. Microsoft threatened to terminate
    an existing contract with AOL that included an icon on the Windows
    Desktop that made it really easy to run sign up for AOL. Though the
    details of the contract were sealed by NDA, the gist of it was that
    AOL could not make enhancements to Netscape, only bug fixes.

    AOL got around this by publishing the gecko core as an Open Source
    project (Mozilla). The OSS developers could add features and
    enhancements, then the Netscape team could "fix" the bugs.

    Shortly after Microsoft started offering IE bundled with Windows 95B,
    I sent an e-mail to Jim Barksdale saying something to the effect of
    "If Microsoft wants to throw in a free browser with their operating
    system, why don't you throw in a free operating system - Linux - with
    your browser?".

    The logistics weren't practical, but about a week after I sent that e-
    mail, Caldera announced that they would be including Netscape with
    their Linux distribution. A few weeks later, Red Hat made a similar
    announcement.

    It's probably a coincidence. I didn't even get a confirmation of
    delivery, or an acknowledgement of the e-mail. Even if he got it, the
    idea is of little value without having someone do what it takes to
    implement it. I would guess that I wasn't the only one making that
    suggestion.



  2. Re: OpenOffice: now Made in China

    Rex Ballard wrote:
    > On Sep 10, 2:07 pm, "DFS" wrote:
    >> ray wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 13:33:34 -0400, DFS wrote:
    >>>> Let me know when the OSS "community" develops some innovative new
    >>>> software.

    >>
    >>> You mean like Netscape?

    >>
    >> NetScape - courtesy of cola nutcaseRexBallard- was a closed source
    >> product until MS put the beatdown on them.

    >
    > Netscape was a closed source project led by Marc Andreeson.
    > Mosaic was an OSS project led by Marc Andreeson.



    "Meanwhile, I was making recommendations to the publisher's mailing
    list. I was making recommendations on how the Mosaic browser could
    be modified to provide electronic commerce, royalty distribution,
    and advertising accounting. In a few weeks, the author's of Mosaic
    implemented those changes in a new browser called Netscape. After a
    bit of tuning and a few thousand downloads, Netscape issued it's IPO
    and made headlines everywhere. In a matter of six months, I had
    generated a 4 billion dollar industry."


    Rex Ballard, on previous versions of www.open4success.org



    > Netscape hired many Mosaic contributors, and offered jobs to nearly
    > all of them. Many, including myself, had other interests, and chose to
    > decline their offer. Netscape offered twice.


    Considering you alone are responsible for the web browsing industry, I hope
    they saw fit to reward you.



    > When AOL purchased Netscape, they initially planned to compete toe to
    > toe with IE against Microsoft/MSN. Microsoft threatened to terminate
    > an existing contract with AOL that included an icon on the Windows
    > Desktop that made it really easy to run sign up for AOL. Though the
    > details of the contract were sealed by NDA, the gist of it was that
    > AOL could not make enhancements to Netscape, only bug fixes.


    Though the details were sealed, your X-ray vision let you read it.


    > AOL got around this by publishing the gecko core as an Open Source
    > project (Mozilla). The OSS developers could add features and
    > enhancements, then the Netscape team could "fix" the bugs.
    >
    > Shortly after Microsoft started offering IE bundled with Windows 95B,
    > I sent an e-mail to Jim Barksdale saying something to the effect of
    > "If Microsoft wants to throw in a free browser with their operating
    > system, why don't you throw in a free operating system - Linux - with
    > your browser?".
    >
    > The logistics weren't practical, but about a week after I sent that e-
    > mail, Caldera announced that they would be including Netscape with
    > their Linux distribution. A few weeks later, Red Hat made a similar
    > announcement.
    >
    > It's probably a coincidence.


    Give yourself more credit here. It was another of your miracle ideas that
    drives IT forward.


    > I didn't even get a confirmation of
    > delivery, or an acknowledgement of the e-mail.


    That doesn't matter. What matters is you sent it. That's all the proof you
    need that you're responsible for Netscape - among many other technologies.



    > Even if he got it, the
    > idea is of little value without having someone do what it takes to
    > implement it. I would guess that I wasn't the only one making that
    > suggestion.


    You must be taking your meds.






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