[News] Verizon Uses Lawyers and Shills to Fight Freedom of Choice, Openness - Linux

This is a discussion on [News] Verizon Uses Lawyers and Shills to Fight Freedom of Choice, Openness - Linux ; Verizon sues FCC over open-access auction ,----[ Quote ] | Media reform group Free Press, a supporter of the open-access rules, accused | Verizon Wireless of sending "lawyers, FUD and money" in an attempt to | overturn the FCC's decision. ...

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Thread: [News] Verizon Uses Lawyers and Shills to Fight Freedom of Choice, Openness

  1. [News] Verizon Uses Lawyers and Shills to Fight Freedom of Choice, Openness

    Verizon sues FCC over open-access auction

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Media reform group Free Press, a supporter of the open-access rules, accused
    | Verizon Wireless of sending "lawyers, FUD and money" in an attempt to
    | overturn the FCC's decision.
    `----

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/infoworld/20...nfoworld/91833

    Business as usual in Verizon then...

    Google vs. Verizon: The 'open access' saga continues

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | First with Net neutrality and now with so-called "open access" rules for
    | forthcoming wireless networks, there seems to be no end to the discord
    | between Google and Verizon.
    `----

    http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-977...=2547-1_3-0-20


    Related:

    Verizon to support the Linux desktop, but only if your rich...

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Verizon has been supporting the linux desktop for Red Hat for
    | various applications for a while now. It wasn't until recently
    | that with the help of some unpaid employees that they got it
    | working for Ubuntu.
    `----

    http://www.treeninjas.com/?p=12


    Thin clients in, PCs out at Verizon Wireless

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Sun's Sun Ray is unique among thin clients, many of which still use
    | some kind of embedded Windows or Linux operating system, even though
    | the applications are shifted to servers.
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | With about 5,000 Sun Ray terminals installed at three Western call
    | centers, and a fourth in progress, Verizon has seen a 60% to 70%
    | drop in desktop problems and a 30% decline in electrical use at
    | each center.
    `----

    http://www.linuxworld.com/news/2007/...rss-linux-news


    Verizon Business Expands OS Support for Enterprises

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "Windows is our most deployed system, but Linux is our fastest-growing
    | one..."
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | He also said that AIX and UX also have strong cross-platform
    | compatibility with systems like Linux, and are well designed to
    | handle applications requiring huge memory and scalability.
    `----

    http://www.linuxinsider.com/rsstory/53095.html


    Verizon takes over Microsoft TV code

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Unhappy over the memory footprint of applications and delays in rolling
    | them out, Verizon has ditched some of Microsoft's television software and
    | has chosen instead to write its own.
    `----

    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060914-7742.html

  2. Re: Verizon Uses Lawyers and Shills to Fight Freedom of Choice, Openness

    On Sep 15, 7:35 am, Roy Schestowitz
    wrote:
    > Verizon sues FCC over open-access auction
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    > | Media reform group Free Press, a
    > | supporter of the open-access rules, accused
    > | Verizon Wireless of sending "lawyers, FUD
    > | and money" in an attempt to
    > | overturn the FCC's decision.
    > `----


    > http://news.yahoo.com/s/infoworld/20...nfoworld/91833


    Keep in mind that common carriers, including Verizon, AT&T, and most
    other carriers have been offering ATM and other digital signalling
    services at different "quality of service" tiers for years. Remember,
    both TCP/IP, Audio, and even Video circuits use the same wires and the
    same "link layer" protocol to pass information. Video and telephone
    circuits are time-critical. Delays in traffic occurr as clicks,
    static, or fade-outs on the audio circuits, and tiles or freezes on
    the digital Video circuits.

    Typically, the TCP/IP traffic is routed through the "whatever's left"
    channels. Media viewers deal with the possible delays by caching up a
    few seconds worth of content. This allows the application to sound
    normal even if a few packets are delayed. The technology was
    originally used in UNIX systems by using pipelines of "cat" to smooth
    the flow of audio. For example, could use:

    cat file.wav | cat | cat | player

    The first cat would pull sectors from the hard drive, the second and
    third cat permit the operating system to cache and queue inputs to
    smooth the flow of data into player.

    As more and more individuals and corporations switch to Voice over IP
    and Video Conferencing over IP, the carriers are more and more pressed
    for revenue. Many commercial customers are willing to pay a premium
    to have their VOIP traffic routed over higher priority circuits
    previously used by their traditional voice lines.

    New Jersey was the original home of AT&T. After Divestiture, the NJ
    organization was Bell Atlantic, which resisted and subverted attempts
    to create toll-free TCP/IP networks. At one point, a super-net of
    almost 500 POPs was required to get toll free access to 90% of New
    Jersey.

    Later Bell Atlantic merged with several other "Baby Bells" to become
    Verizon. Verizon continued to drag their feet in the deployement of
    internet capable lines. In many cases, the cable companies introduced
    high speed internet first, and Verizon would enter the local market
    2-5 years later.

    I lived in one place for almost 6 years. When I first moved in, I had
    cable download, but dial-up upload. About 2 years later, 2-way cable
    arrived. Finally, 6 years later, I received an invitation to sign up
    for their DSL service, just as I had moved to a new place, where the
    cable company offered 8 Mb download and 2 Mb upload speeds.

    Verizon never integrated their wireless service either. Even when I
    was a Verizon phone customer and Verizon Wireless customer, I got two
    different phone bills, two different phone numbers, and neither
    provided high speed internet access.

    I still use Verizon Wireless, primarily because I get coverage in
    numerous places that don't support AT&T and other carriers. I very
    rarely get a dropped call because I am passing through a bad coverage
    area, and I've only had to pay a total of $80 domestic roaming
    charges, once when I was in southern Missouri, and once when I was in
    the southern Colorado Rockies. I was even able to add international
    service when I went to India. I've even been able to use my cell
    phone as a modem when at an airport that didn't support WiFi.



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