by Scot Colford - Linux

This is a discussion on by Scot Colford - Linux ; http://dbinfo.bpl.org/dbblog/ Digital Rights Management February 7th, 2008 by Scot Colford We often get questions about why people can't download OverDrive audio books or video to their iPods. Or sometimes, users are unhappy that they cannot preserve that downloaded material on ...

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  1. by Scot Colford

    http://dbinfo.bpl.org/dbblog/
    Digital Rights Management

    February 7th, 2008 by Scot Colford

    We often get questions about why people can't
    download OverDrive audio books or video to their
    iPods. Or sometimes, users are unhappy that they
    cannot preserve that downloaded material on their
    computers forever. Well, the Boston Public Library
    does not necessarily own the material you download --
    we license it. Part of the agreement that allows us
    to license the material is the use of Digital Rights
    Managment (DRM). DRM is a software add-on that
    prevents digital files from being copied and
    redistributed, just like the software that prevents
    you from copying a DVD or a commercial VHS tape.

    Listen, we all know that DRM is annoying at best. But
    we're able to offer content that would not be
    available to anyone in digital format otherwise
    because publishers feel comfortable with DRM. I hope
    that changes, but until then, we'll keep trying to
    offer the best content to the most people.

    Here's the official BPL response. Rest assured that
    it was written by a real human being who knows what
    he's talking about, namely me:

    One of the most popular new services provided by
    the Boston Public Library is OverDrive, a
    vendor-supplied lending system for electronic
    books, audio books, music, and videos. Digital
    Library Reserve, the vendor from whom we license
    this content has secured thousands of popular,
    high-quality titles from many major publishers
    under the condition that digital rights management
    (DRM) measures are taken to ensure that the
    material cannot be redistributed. Furthermore, the
    specific DRM schema used on OverDrive titles allow
    material to circulate for distinct periods of
    time, permitting the library to honor its
    licensing contract and to provide a service
    paralleling the loan of physical material. No
    personal patron information is shared with
    OverDrive or other third-parties in the download
    or DRM process. Please see the BPL privacy policy
    for more information
    http://www.bpl.org/general/policies/privacy.htm

    While we are well aware of the frustration DRM
    schema can cause end users, we feel that the high
    numbers of use (nearly 100,000 downloads since
    September, 2005) send a strong signal that our
    customers want access to the material OverDrive
    provides. For many years, the BPL has offered
    material in a variety of formats that require
    specific hardware and/or contain copy-protection
    technologies (DVDs, Macrovision-protected VHS
    tapes), but we've never been asked to discontinue
    circulation of this material because not every
    customer has the ability to use them.

    Almost all of the titles available through
    OverDrive are also available in other formats.
    Customers who are unable to use DRM-protected
    content can certainly access the same content via
    CDs, DVDs, print books, and magnetic media. We
    also provide links to several other sources for
    digital eBooks, audio, and video that are in the
    public domain, and therefore do not require DRM.

    Boston Public Library is committed to providing
    free access to community-owned resources and will
    continue to search for partners who can provide
    material to the most number of users possible.

    Scot Colford
    Applications Manager
    Boston Public Library
    scolford at bpl.org

    Posted in General
    http://dbinfo.bpl.org/dbblog/

  2. Re: by Scot Colford

    by Scot Colford
    > http://dbinfo.bpl.org/dbblog/


    > Digital Rights Management
    >
    > February 7th, 2008 by Scot Colford
    >
    > We often get questions about why people can't
    > download OverDrive audio books or video to their
    > iPods. Or sometimes, users are unhappy that they
    > cannot preserve that downloaded material on their
    > computers forever. Well, the Boston Public Library
    > does not necessarily own the material you download --
    > we license it. Part of the agreement that allows us
    > to license the material is the use of Digital Rights
    > Managment (DRM). DRM is a software add-on that
    > prevents digital files from being copied and
    > redistributed, just like the software that prevents
    > you from copying a DVD or a commercial VHS tape.
    >
    > Listen, we all know that DRM is annoying at best. But
    > we're able to offer content that would not be
    > available to anyone in digital format otherwise
    > because publishers feel comfortable with DRM. I hope
    > that changes, but until then, we'll keep trying to
    > offer the best content to the most people.
    >
    > Here's the official BPL response. Rest assured that
    > it was written by a real human being who knows what
    > he's talking about, namely me:
    >
    > One of the most popular new services provided by
    > the Boston Public Library is OverDrive, a
    > vendor-supplied lending system for electronic
    > books, audio books, music, and videos. Digital
    > Library Reserve, the vendor from whom we license
    > this content has secured thousands of popular,
    > high-quality titles from many major publishers
    > under the condition that digital rights management
    > (DRM) measures are taken to ensure that the
    > material cannot be redistributed. Furthermore, the
    > specific DRM schema used on OverDrive titles allow
    > material to circulate for distinct periods of
    > time, permitting the library to honor its
    > licensing contract and to provide a service
    > paralleling the loan of physical material. No
    > personal patron information is shared with
    > OverDrive or other third-parties in the download
    > or DRM process. Please see the BPL privacy policy
    > for more information
    > http://www.bpl.org/general/policies/privacy.htm
    >
    > While we are well aware of the frustration DRM
    > schema can cause end users, we feel that the high
    > numbers of use (nearly 100,000 downloads since
    > September, 2005) send a strong signal that our
    > customers want access to the material OverDrive
    > provides. For many years, the BPL has offered
    > material in a variety of formats that require
    > specific hardware and/or contain copy-protection
    > technologies (DVDs, Macrovision-protected VHS
    > tapes), but we've never been asked to discontinue
    > circulation of this material because not every
    > customer has the ability to use them.
    >
    > Almost all of the titles available through
    > OverDrive are also available in other formats.
    > Customers who are unable to use DRM-protected
    > content can certainly access the same content via
    > CDs, DVDs, print books, and magnetic media. We
    > also provide links to several other sources for
    > digital eBooks, audio, and video that are in the
    > public domain, and therefore do not require DRM.
    >
    > Boston Public Library is committed to providing
    > free access to community-owned resources and will
    > continue to search for partners who can provide
    > material to the most number of users possible.
    >
    > Scot Colford
    > Applications Manager
    > Boston Public Library
    > scolford at bpl.org
    >
    > Posted in General
    > http://dbinfo.bpl.org/dbblog/


    Introducing DRM changes the line between what is your own, and
    what belongs to the Englobulators.

  3. Re: by Scot Colford

    On Sun, 10 Feb 2008 21:09:20 +0000, [H]omer wrote:

    > Verily I say unto thee, that the zak spake thusly:
    >
    >>> Digital Rights Management
    >>>
    >>> February 7th, 2008 by Scot Colford
    >>>
    >>> We often get questions about why people can't download OverDrive
    >>> audio books or video to their iPods. Or sometimes, users are
    >>> unhappy that they cannot preserve that downloaded material on their
    >>> computers forever. Well, the Boston Public Library does not
    >>> necessarily own the material you download -- we license it. Part of
    >>> the agreement that allows us to license the material is the use of
    >>> Digital Rights Managment (DRM). DRM is a software add-on that
    >>> prevents digital files from being copied and redistributed, just
    >>> like the software that prevents you from copying a DVD or a
    >>> commercial VHS tape.

    >
    > And what DRM do they have in place to prevent people from copying the
    > physical books that they borrow, with a scanner or even just copying
    > them down with a pen and paper?
    >
    > The ultimate hypocrisy of copyrights on any form of media, be it films;
    > books; or music, is that everyone who consumes these works immediately
    > violates its copyright, merely by consuming the publish work. If one
    > thinks of the human mind as a storage device (which in part, it is),
    > then simply watching a film; reading a book; or listening to music
    > produces a copy of that material in the mind, which can be "reproduced"
    > in words or in hard copy. Indeed this was the historical basis for
    > preserving culture orally through stories, that has now been perverted
    > into the neon-lit world of slime called Hollywood, where stories are now
    > only as worthy as their box-office takings.
    >
    > So once someone has read a book, then the knowledge contained therein
    > has /already/ been transferred. Attempting to control the dissemination
    > of that knowledge with technology and the law, is gross perversion and
    > utterly pointless. The principle has already been broken at the first
    > point of contact.
    >
    > If public libraries are going to start restricting access to their
    > books, then they might as well all close down and reopen as book shops,
    > because that is essentially what they'll become ... the guardians of
    > commercially licensed "Intellectual Property", rather than places of
    > free access to information.
    >
    > Next time you read a book, or watch a film, or listen to music, please
    > make sure that you undertake a course of electro-shock therapy, and get
    > a lobotomy to purge that infringing material from your mind. Don't
    > discuss the material with anyone, never write about it in a diary or
    > blog, never sing a copyrighted song to yourself in the bath, and never
    > again even think about that copyrighted material, for fear of violating
    > some poor millionaire Intellectual Property holder's precious "rights".
    >
    >> Introducing DRM changes the line between what is your own, and what
    >> belongs to the Englobulators.

    >
    > The Englobulators may think they /own/ knowledge, but a man's /mind/ is
    > his own ... the ultimate circumvention device.


    Hey Scott,

    Meet [Homer] and Roy Schestowitz along with Mark Kent who should be chiming
    in shortly.

    As you can see, these three are a little bit unstable and have some twisted
    view that everything on earth should be given away for free.

    Yet, they don't even practice what they preach.

    [Homer] for example has a statistics program that everyone knows is totally
    bogus. He will not release the source code to this program.
    Yet he expects others to give away their source code.
    A total hypocrite.

    Then we have Roy Schestowitz, whose posts I am certain you see here by the
    thousands.
    Roy was caught using copyrighted graphics on his web site and even when
    asked to remove them by the author he delayed and lagged before he actually
    removed them.
    He is yet another total phony.

    Make Kent is just plain twisted.
    He believes that there is no such thing as intellectual property.
    Words haven't been invented yet that can describe Mark Kent.

    Also, I will advise you that if your library system starts having troubles,
    look to the radical, zealot Linux community for the source because these
    guys mean business with this crusade they are on.

    I would hope that Apple Mac support will be forthcoming because that is a
    market that is growing by leaps and bounds, unlike the Linux desktop market
    which most studies put at around 0.6 percent.

    Best of luck!

    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

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