Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents - Linux ; Roy Schestowitz espoused: > Recent patent/copyright infringement cases filed in U.S. District Courts > > ,----[ Quote ] >| Electronic Data Systems of Plano claims it holds the rights to U.S. Patent >| Nos. 7,156,300 and 7,255,268 which generally relate ...

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Thread: Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

  1. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    > Recent patent/copyright infringement cases filed in U.S. District Courts
    >
    > ,----[ Quote ]
    >| Electronic Data Systems of Plano claims it holds the rights to U.S. Patent
    >| Nos. 7,156,300 and 7,255,268 which generally relate to a system and method
    >| for electronic purchase of prepaid telephone services. The plaintiff's
    >| original complaint describes the inventions whereby a customer can purchase a
    >| specified amount of telephone service through a personal computer or an ATM
    >| machine.
    > `----
    >
    > http://www.digitalmajority.org/forum...istrict-courts


    Telephone cards were first used in the 1980s in large numbers, before
    the explosion of the mobile market in Europe and Asia. We still have
    some card-phones around, but as pretty much everyone has a mobile, there
    are few call-boxes left.

    Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    of these things.

    Will someone *please* shut down the USPTO.

    --
    | Mark Kent -- mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | My (new) blog: http://www.thereisnomagic.org |

  2. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    Mark Kent wrote:

    > Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    > codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    > of these things.
    >
    > Will someone please shut down the USPTO.


    Or start knee-capping patent trolls.

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  3. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    In article ,
    Mark Kent wrote:
    > >| Electronic Data Systems of Plano claims it holds the rights to U.S. Patent
    > >| Nos. 7,156,300 and 7,255,268 which generally relate to a system and method
    > >| for electronic purchase of prepaid telephone services. The plaintiff's

    ....
    > Telephone cards were first used in the 1980s in large numbers, before
    > the explosion of the mobile market in Europe and Asia. We still have
    > some card-phones around, but as pretty much everyone has a mobile, there
    > are few call-boxes left.
    >
    > Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    > codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    > of these things.


    That's nice, Mark. But what does it have to do with those patents?

    --
    --Tim Smith

  4. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    In article ,
    RonB wrote:
    > Mark Kent wrote:
    >
    > > Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    > > codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    > > of these things.
    > >
    > > Will someone please shut down the USPTO.

    >
    > Or start knee-capping patent trolls.


    What patent troll is involved in this case?


    --
    --Tim Smith

  5. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    Tim Smith writes:

    > In article ,
    > Mark Kent wrote:
    >> >| Electronic Data Systems of Plano claims it holds the rights to U.S. Patent
    >> >| Nos. 7,156,300 and 7,255,268 which generally relate to a system and method
    >> >| for electronic purchase of prepaid telephone services. The plaintiff's

    > ...
    >> Telephone cards were first used in the 1980s in large numbers, before
    >> the explosion of the mobile market in Europe and Asia. We still have
    >> some card-phones around, but as pretty much everyone has a mobile, there
    >> are few call-boxes left.
    >>
    >> Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    >> codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    >> of these things.

    >
    > That's nice, Mark. But what does it have to do with those patents?


    It's astonishing isn't it what Mark Kent will waffle on about thinking
    he is educating the great unwashed. I just *know* he's a pompous, pumped
    up jackass of a teacher who is used to boring small children to death
    about his holidays and the death defying feats of derring do he
    committed during his National Service. Yawn.

  6. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    On Sun, 10 Feb 2008 11:52:40 +0100, Hadron wrote:

    > Tim Smith writes:
    >
    >> In article ,
    >> Mark Kent wrote:
    >>> >| Electronic Data Systems of Plano claims it holds the rights to U.S. Patent
    >>> >| Nos. 7,156,300 and 7,255,268 which generally relate to a system and method
    >>> >| for electronic purchase of prepaid telephone services. The plaintiff's

    >> ...
    >>> Telephone cards were first used in the 1980s in large numbers, before
    >>> the explosion of the mobile market in Europe and Asia. We still have
    >>> some card-phones around, but as pretty much everyone has a mobile, there
    >>> are few call-boxes left.
    >>>
    >>> Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    >>> codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    >>> of these things.

    >>
    >> That's nice, Mark. But what does it have to do with those patents?

    >
    > It's astonishing isn't it what Mark Kent will waffle on about thinking
    > he is educating the great unwashed. I just *know* he's a pompous, pumped
    > up jackass of a teacher who is used to boring small children to death
    > about his holidays and the death defying feats of derring do he
    > committed during his National Service. Yawn.


    Could you imagine having Mark Kent as your teacher?
    I'll bet he sounds supercilious and boring like Roy Schestowitz does.
    --
    Moshe Goldfarb
    Collector of soaps from around the globe.
    Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
    http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/

  7. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    In article ,
    Hadron wrote:
    > >> Telephone cards were first used in the 1980s in large numbers, before
    > >> the explosion of the mobile market in Europe and Asia. We still have
    > >> some card-phones around, but as pretty much everyone has a mobile, there
    > >> are few call-boxes left.
    > >>
    > >> Cards are now more frequently used in mobile pre-pay services, where
    > >> codes are entered and verified, so we're already on the 3rd generation
    > >> of these things.

    > >
    > > That's nice, Mark. But what does it have to do with those patents?

    >
    > It's astonishing isn't it what Mark Kent will waffle on about thinking
    > he is educating the great unwashed. I just *know* he's a pompous, pumped
    > up jackass of a teacher who is used to boring small children to death
    > about his holidays and the death defying feats of derring do he
    > committed during his National Service. Yawn.


    Actually, a lot of people blither on about this patent or that patent
    without actually having taken a peek at the actual patent. Mark is not
    along in this.

    The summaries of patents in the press, or even the abstract in the
    patent itself, do NOT tell you what the patent is claiming. To get
    that, you have to look at (prepare to be surprised, folks!) the claims.

    Hell, if someone were to invent a functioning bionic eye, the patent
    abstract would probably talk about a device for improving human vision,
    and Mark and others would blither on about how we've had eyeglasses for
    centuries.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  8. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    Tim Smith wrote:

    > Hell, if someone were to invent a functioning bionic eye, the patent
    > abstract would probably talk about a device for improving human vision,
    > and Mark and others would blither on about how we've had eyeglasses for
    > centuries.


    Apparently you wouldn't really have to invent the bionic eye. Merely come up
    with the idea -- patent that, and then wait until someone invents something
    that actually works.

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  9. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    RonB writes:

    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Hell, if someone were to invent a functioning bionic eye, the patent
    >> abstract would probably talk about a device for improving human vision,
    >> and Mark and others would blither on about how we've had eyeglasses for
    >> centuries.

    >
    > Apparently you wouldn't really have to invent the bionic eye. Merely come up
    > with the idea -- patent that, and then wait until someone invents something
    > that actually works.


    RonB, please don't interrupt when adults are talking.

    Just say things like "Yes roy" and "this distro rocks".

  10. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    Hadron wrote:

    > RonB, please don't interrupt when adults are talking.


    Let me know when they show up.

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  11. Re: [News] Telephone Card Patented, UK Talks Software Patents

    In article ,
    RonB wrote:
    > > Hell, if someone were to invent a functioning bionic eye, the patent
    > > abstract would probably talk about a device for improving human vision,
    > > and Mark and others would blither on about how we've had eyeglasses for
    > > centuries.

    >
    > Apparently you wouldn't really have to invent the bionic eye. Merely come up
    > with the idea -- patent that, and then wait until someone invents something
    > that actually works.


    Go ahead and try. Let us know how you get past the enablement
    requirement.

    --
    --Tim Smith

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