installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions - Linux

This is a discussion on installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions - Linux ; I just put together a pc with lots of disk, a spare 30gb partition as well as 2 X 250gb drives running striped on the built in promise controller on the ASUS P4PE board. I only have 250GB of this ...

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  1. installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    I just put together a pc with lots of disk, a spare 30gb partition as
    well as 2 X 250gb drives running striped on the built in promise
    controller on the ASUS P4PE board. I only have 250GB of this formatted
    (NTFS) so far.

    I am running XP pro on this machine currently, as I need it for work
    stuff, and plan to dual boot it. I am going to install linux on the 30
    gb partition on the main drive, and perhaps use some of the unformatted
    250gb for linux if I need it. I havent used linux a lot since Suse 7.3
    and IIRC linux can read NTFS partitions but not write to them, is this
    still the case?

    But my main question is, which distro, if any, has built in virtual
    machine capability? I was at a trade show recently where I thought I saw
    the latest offering from SuSE having a built in VM capability, quite
    slick from what I remember, being able to rotate through desktops. Or is
    this just virtual desktops like any distro has? This is going to make my
    decision which distro I am going with, if a distro has built in VM
    capability so I can boot up my XP from within linux then thats what I am
    giong with.

    Currently two I am considering are Ubuntu and open SuSE 10, but thats
    just from my previous SuSE experience and good things I have heard about
    Ubuntu. I am open to anything, but ease of installing new apps will also
    be a deciding factor.

    Given that I would like to be able to run windows virtually (not wine
    etc) from within linux, which distro will best suit my needs?

  2. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 21:04:52 +0000, GS wrote:

    > I just put together a pc with lots of disk, a spare 30gb partition as
    > well as 2 X 250gb drives running striped on the built in promise
    > controller on the ASUS P4PE board. I only have 250GB of this formatted
    > (NTFS) so far.
    >
    > I am running XP pro on this machine currently, as I need it for work
    > stuff, and plan to dual boot it. I am going to install linux on the 30
    > gb partition on the main drive, and perhaps use some of the unformatted
    > 250gb for linux if I need it. I havent used linux a lot since Suse 7.3
    > and IIRC linux can read NTFS partitions but not write to them, is this
    > still the case?


    No. NTFS-3g is now sufficiently mature that most individuals have no
    qualms using it to write to NTFS partitions.

    >


  3. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    GS wrote:

    > I just put together a pc with lots of disk, a spare 30gb partition as
    > well as 2 X 250gb drives running striped on the built in promise
    > controller on the ASUS P4PE board. I only have 250GB of this formatted
    > (NTFS) so far.
    >
    > I am running XP pro on this machine currently, as I need it for work
    > stuff, and plan to dual boot it. I am going to install linux on the 30
    > gb partition on the main drive, and perhaps use some of the unformatted
    > 250gb for linux if I need it. I havent used linux a lot since Suse 7.3
    > and IIRC linux can read NTFS partitions but not write to them, is this
    > still the case?
    >
    > But my main question is, which distro, if any, has built in virtual
    > machine capability? I was at a trade show recently where I thought I saw
    > the latest offering from SuSE having a built in VM capability, quite
    > slick from what I remember, being able to rotate through desktops. Or is
    > this just virtual desktops like any distro has? This is going to make my
    > decision which distro I am going with, if a distro has built in VM
    > capability so I can boot up my XP from within linux then thats what I am
    > giong with.
    >
    > Currently two I am considering are Ubuntu and open SuSE 10, but thats
    > just from my previous SuSE experience and good things I have heard about
    > Ubuntu. I am open to anything, but ease of installing new apps will also
    > be a deciding factor.
    >
    > Given that I would like to be able to run windows virtually (not wine
    > etc) from within linux, which distro will best suit my needs?



    Trying to dual boot is so old hat.
    A new PC powerful enough to run Linux at extreme speeds (AMD Semprom 3600)
    is 135 pounds inc vat at www.ebuyer.com (Acer Business PC) - cheaper than
    expee. The whole thing comes with Linux pre-installed so you can get
    Qemu from that brand of linux or say download and
    install Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com) and download qemu
    using synaptic. Run most things in qemu without problems.



  4. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    7 wrote:
    > GS wrote:
    >
    >> I just put together a pc with lots of disk, a spare 30gb partition as
    >> well as 2 X 250gb drives running striped on the built in promise
    >> controller on the ASUS P4PE board. I only have 250GB of this formatted
    >> (NTFS) so far.
    >>
    >> I am running XP pro on this machine currently, as I need it for work
    >> stuff, and plan to dual boot it. I am going to install linux on the 30
    >> gb partition on the main drive, and perhaps use some of the unformatted
    >> 250gb for linux if I need it. I havent used linux a lot since Suse 7.3
    >> and IIRC linux can read NTFS partitions but not write to them, is this
    >> still the case?
    >>
    >> But my main question is, which distro, if any, has built in virtual
    >> machine capability? I was at a trade show recently where I thought I saw
    >> the latest offering from SuSE having a built in VM capability, quite
    >> slick from what I remember, being able to rotate through desktops. Or is
    >> this just virtual desktops like any distro has? This is going to make my
    >> decision which distro I am going with, if a distro has built in VM
    >> capability so I can boot up my XP from within linux then thats what I am
    >> giong with.
    >>
    >> Currently two I am considering are Ubuntu and open SuSE 10, but thats
    >> just from my previous SuSE experience and good things I have heard about
    >> qemu . I am open to anything, but ease of installing new apps will also
    >> be a deciding factor.
    >>
    >> Given that I would like to be able to run windows virtually (not wine
    >> etc) from within linux, which distro will best suit my needs?

    >
    >
    > Trying to dual boot is so old hat.
    > A new PC powerful enough to run Linux at extreme speeds (AMD Semprom 3600)
    > is 135 pounds inc vat at www.ebuyer.com (Acer Business PC) - cheaper than
    > expee. The whole thing comes with Linux pre-installed so you can get
    > Qemu from that brand of linux or say download and
    > install Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com) and download qemu
    > using synaptic. Run most things in qemu without problems.
    >
    >


    No one is of any help in this NG. They just lip service. I suggest you
    post to a SuSe or Ubuntu NG if you expect to find anyone technical
    enough that can guide you. 7 is not the one.

  5. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    On Jan 26, 4:04 pm, GS wrote:

    > But my main question is, which distro, if any, has built in virtual
    > machine capability?


    Most Linux distributions support virtual machine capability, it's more
    a question of WHICH virtual machine technology you want to use.

    > I was at a trade show recently where I thought I saw
    > the latest offering from SuSE having a built in VM capability, quite
    > slick from what I remember, being able to rotate through desktops.


    SUSE is a very aggressive supporter of Xen, which is a popular system
    because it's completely free and available as an open source project.
    The Xen project has been very successful in getting Windows XP to run
    as a client.

    > Or is this just virtual desktops like any distro has?


    Yes. The virtual desktops are a function of the desktop system used,
    both GNOME and KDE support virtual desktops, as well as OLVWM and
    FVWM.

    > This is going to make my
    > decision which distro I am going with, if a distro has built in VM
    > capability so I can boot up my XP from within linux then thats what I am
    > giong with.


    You might want to consider which VM you want to go with. Personally,
    I prefer VMWare, because they have better support for various
    platforms and various mixes of 32 and 64 bit systems. Both VMWare and
    Xen are good at making exploiting the efficiencies of Linux as a host
    operating system to actually improve the performance and security of
    the clients, especially Windows.

    > Currently two I am considering are Ubuntu and open SuSE 10, but thats
    > just from my previous SuSE experience and good things I have heard about
    > Ubuntu. I am open to anything, but ease of installing new apps will also
    > be a deciding factor.


    I have used both SUSE and Ubuntu. I tend to prefer SUSE, just because
    there are options for commercial support, as well as numerous
    applications not offered by most of the other distributions. SUSE has
    always been aggressive about getting as many applications as possible
    supported and included in their distribution. I also like the YAST
    management tools.

    I also use Red Hat, because there is corporate support available. I'm
    not as impressed by the software offerings, but there is good support
    for commercial applications such as Lotus Notes 8, as well as other
    commercial applications.

    My suggestion would be to go with SUSE and try Xen first. If you
    don't like that, you can install VMWare player, on Linux and use that
    to run the Windows client. VMWare workstation can be used to
    configure the virtual client to boot from the Windows NTFS partition
    instead of a virtual file system, but VMWare Workstation isn't free.
    You can get an evaluation copy for 30 days and register it for around
    $150.

    > Given that I would like to be able to run windows virtually (not wine
    > etc) from within linux, which distro will best suit my needs?


    You might want to consider using VMWare Converter to capture your
    existing XP system and have it generate a virtual machine image into
    the Linux file system or a USB drive. Then you can have the security
    and performance of the ext3 filesystem, along with better disk caching
    and buffering, but at the same time, you can have an XP image that can
    be easily backed up and restored from a Windows PC. You can use
    VMWare player to use "play" that image. It starts like any other
    application, by double-clicking the images vmx file.

    You already have the legal XP license, the VMWare client cannot be
    used on a machine that is not licensed for XP, but you could use it on
    any machine that is licensed for XP.

    Rex Ballard
    http://open4success.org


  6. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 17:54:22 -0500, Cross Posting HO wrote a bunch of
    crap noone cares about. His real name is "Troll".

  7. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 23:03:13 GMT, alt wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 17:54:22 -0500, Cross Posting HO wrote a bunch of
    > crap noone cares about. His real name is "Troll".


    And your's is Donovan.
    Who cares?

  8. Re: installing a distro on new machine, virtual machine questions

    On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 21:04:52 +0000, GS wrote:

    > Given that I would like to be able to run windows virtually (not wine
    > etc) from within linux, which distro will best suit my needs?


    Pretty much any distro will as long as it runs the VM software of your
    choice. VMWare runs on pretty much all platforms and Qemu has also been
    ported quite widely. The real choice is in which distro you wish to use
    that supports the _linux_native_ applications that you want to run.

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