HELP: System suddenly fails to boot - Linux

This is a discussion on HELP: System suddenly fails to boot - Linux ; I am ripping my hair out with a linux 2.6 system that has worked reliably for a number of years, but which now this morning suddenly failed to boot. What happens is that the boot sequence gets to the point ...

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Thread: HELP: System suddenly fails to boot

  1. HELP: System suddenly fails to boot

    I am ripping my hair out with a linux 2.6 system that has worked reliably for a number of years, but which now this morning suddenly
    failed to boot.

    What happens is that the boot sequence gets to the point where it does swapon, and then can't find the swap partition. The
    subsequent attempt to mount the primary partition readonly appears to work, but when it tries to go read/write, it fails with the
    error:

    fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/sda3

    It then prints out a message about the superblock possibly being corrupt and suggesting I run e2fsck against it. Iit doesn't drop
    into single-user mode; it just processes a few more boot script instructions and hangs...apparently forever.

    The really weird thing is this: I keep a backup Slackware partition on this same computer, and when I boot into it everything works
    fine. More importantly, I can mount and browse the partitions I normally use (which are /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda4 in my normal boot
    sequence, but are /dev/hdc3 and /dev/hdc4 when running under Slackware).

    Most importantly of all, e2fsck reports no errors of any kind on the primary boot partition, not even bad blocks (I did the
    non-destructive read/write test). I ran it against those partitions from within Slackware.

    What the heck is going on?? How can a partition have a clean bill of health when run under one distribution and fail to mount when
    booted under a different distribution on the same hardware??

    FYI, my primary distro is LinuxFromScratch.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated as I am totally dead in the water here, and am facing having to rebuild my entire system for
    no reason that I can see.

    - Mark

  2. Re: HELP: System suddenly fails to boot

    Check the configuration of your loader(Grub or Lilo)

  3. Re: HELP: System suddenly fails to boot

    I'm not sure what you mean. I believe the GRUB configuration is fine, because (a) it can boot into my alternative Linux partition
    (Slackware), which is on the same hard disk as the partition that fails and (b) because the "primary" partition appears to get all
    the way through processing rcsysinit.d before dying.

    I discovered that part of the problem involved some corruption or what not of the udev rules. That's what was keeping the system
    from recognizing the SATA drive. I've fixed that -- the partitions are recognized now -- but the boot still fails.

    - Mark

  4. Re: HELP: System suddenly fails to boot

    In ,
    Mark Olbert mentions:

    >I'm not sure what you mean. I believe the GRUB configuration is fine, because
    >(a) it can boot into my alternative Linux partition (Slackware), which is on
    >the same hard disk as the partition that fails and (b) because the "primary"
    >partition appears to get all the way through processing rcsysinit.d before
    >dying.
    >
    >I discovered that part of the problem involved some corruption or what not of
    >the udev rules. That's what was keeping the system from recognizing the SATA
    >drive. I've fixed that -- the partitions are recognized now -- but the boot
    >still fails.


    Hard to say without actually being there, but, if you've got fsck installed
    (and available) you could try running it against the root partition. It sounds
    like it can't mount something and is insisting on running fsck.

    If you've got access to the slackware partition, you can most likely
    run fsck from within slackware (against the other partition) and then
    try a reboot.

    Do a 'man fsck' before running it so you're familiar with what it's doing.

    Something like fsck /dev/

    (This can take a very long time)

    Jamie
    --
    http://www.geniegate.com Custom web programming
    Perl * Java * UNIX User Management Solutions

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