billg predicts the digital future .. - Linux

This is a discussion on billg predicts the digital future .. - Linux ; "The way people interact with computers is going to dramatically change in the next five years, Microsoft chief Bill Gates has told BBC News" "We're adding the ability to touch and directly manipulate, we're adding vision so the computer can ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: billg predicts the digital future ..

  1. billg predicts the digital future ..

    "The way people interact with computers is going to dramatically
    change in the next five years, Microsoft chief Bill Gates has told BBC
    News"

    "We're adding the ability to touch and directly manipulate, we're
    adding vision so the computer can see what you're doing, we're adding
    the pen, we're adding speech,"

    "Citing the success of the iPhone and the controller for the Nintendo
    Wii game console, Mr Gates said such interfaces were a big hit with
    consumers"

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7174333.stm

    The Multi-Touch Screen
    http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/...-touch-screen/

  2. Re: billg predicts the digital future ..

    On Jan 11, 7:46 am, Doug Mentohl wrote:

    > "The way people interact with computers is going to dramatically
    > change in the next five years, Microsoft chief Bill Gates has told BBC
    > News"


    This isn't a new prediction. We have been changing how we interact
    with computers for decades. Sometimes the problem is that the
    computer isn't fast enough to work with us. UNIX has been using
    sensory gloves, 3d goggles, and 3d scanners, and other sensors as
    input for years. The problem is that until recently, a pair of 3d
    goggles cost about $2,000. A 3D laser scanner would cost about
    $4,000. A fully articulated glove would cost $3,000 per hand.

    As computers become faster and cheaper, and UNIX/Linux appliances
    proliferate, the cost of these devices is gradually dropping. Goggles
    that create a 2D HDTV "screen" have dropped to about $300 per pair.
    Simplified input gloves have dropped to $400 each, and 3d laser
    scanners now used to emulate a keyboard are down to about $200 each.

    > "We're adding the ability to touch and directly manipulate, we're
    > adding vision so the computer can see what you're doing,


    Linux/Unix has not only had vision, but has been able to use camera
    images, combined with controlled inputs such as a black suit with key
    reference points highlighted by lights or reflectors, to capture human
    and animal motion in 3D, and convert these motions into 3D images
    using CAD technology.television

    > we're adding the pen,


    Linux/Unix had large drafting tables and large pens and pads back when
    Microsoft was still trying to sort out TSRs in MS-DOS 3.0. Much of
    this technology has been scaled down. In some cases, the peripheral
    controller uses a small embedded Linux or embedded UNIX system as the
    controller.

    The Wii interface was great. Of course, similar sensors have been
    used in the medical profession for decades. And those devices were
    orchestrated by UNIX or LInux.

    For $10,000 you can have a tank simulator that even shakes when you
    get hit, and has 4-5 screens. For $15,000 you can get a flight
    simulator based on Unix or Linux that will use 4-6 screens to simulate
    the windows of the ****pit, as well as the instrument panel. It even
    includes all of the switches joysticks, and levers of a real jet. For
    $25,000 you can even get a simulator that uses hydrolics to tilt the
    simulator "****pit" to give you the sensation of actually flying.

    I've just had two tests with a pair of goggles that could tell me
    where my eyes were looking, and could detect even the most subtle
    motions. The technology was originally developed by a quadrapelegic
    and team, starting in the 1970s and through the 1980s, powered by
    UNIX.

    Similar techniques are used for helecoptor contols, gun sites, and
    missle sites.

    And then there are sniper rifles that can be used to help target
    missles to within 4 inches of the desired target.

    > we're adding speech,"


    Speech recognition has been the "holy grail" of since the first
    Altairs were sold in 1977. The problem with speech recognition is
    that recognition schemes have always been limited. Speech recognition
    won't be practical until you can plug your computer (or appliance
    controller) into the telephone, dial into a conference call, and get a
    word-for-word accurate transcript of everything said by every person
    on the call, including who said it. There are intelligence agencies
    who have this capability using Unix or Linux systems, but my
    understanding is that it's still very expensive, possibly several
    thousand dollars per circuit.

    > "Citing the success of the iPhone and the controller for the Nintendo
    > Wii game console, Mr Gates said such interfaces were a big hit with
    > consumers"


    Microsoft has to explain why Windows PDA and X-Box did so poorly while
    iPhone and Nintendo had waiting lists and waiting lines. Even the
    Asus EEE 4g and OLPC were on back-order, while Vista PC sales in the
    christmas season seemed to falter even as prices droppet to "fire
    sale" prices.

    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7174333.stm


    > The Multi-Touch Screenhttp://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/03/27/the-multi-touch-screen/



+ Reply to Thread