I guess they're still in the planning stage... - Linux

This is a discussion on I guess they're still in the planning stage... - Linux ; .... 'cause it's been 7.5 years and the results are pitiful. ================================================== =========== Linux Mounts MS Offense Leander Kahney 08.15.00 | 3:00 AM Some big names in the computer industry are teaming up to help create a free, easy-to-use operating ...

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  1. I guess they're still in the planning stage...

    .... 'cause it's been 7.5 years and the results are pitiful.
    ================================================== ===========

    Linux Mounts MS Offense

    Leander Kahney 08.15.00 | 3:00 AM

    Some big names in the computer industry are teaming up to help create a
    free, easy-to-use operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows.

    Sun Microsystems, IBM, and Compaq have joined with Red Hat, the Free
    Software Foundation, and VA Linux, among others, to form the Gnome
    Foundation, a coalition to develop and promote the Gnome desktop
    environment.

    http://www.wired.com/science/discove...?currentPage=1



  2. Re: I guess they're still in the planning stage...

    On Jan 7, 1:31 pm, "DFS" wrote:
    > ... 'cause it's been 7.5 years and the results are pitiful.
    > ================================================== ===========
    >
    > Linux Mounts MS Offense
    >
    > Leander Kahney 08.15.00 | 3:00 AM
    >
    > Some big names in the computer industry are teaming up to help create a
    > free, easy-to-use operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows.
    >
    > Sun Microsystems, IBM, and Compaq have joined with Red Hat, the Free
    > Software Foundation, and VA Linux, among others, to form the Gnome
    > Foundation, a coalition to develop and promote the Gnome desktop
    > environment.


    Let's see, that was published August 15, 2000.

    > http://www.wired.com/science/discove...8148?currentPa...


    Since then, Sun has elevated Linux to a primary platform for Java.
    IBM has sold thousands of servers powered by Linux, and when
    Microsoft's "all or nothing" strategy prevented IBM from selling Linux
    on their PCs, the sold the PC division to Lenovo. The one line they
    still make, the Intellistation line, can be ordered with either Linux
    or Windows.

    HP introduced AMD-64 based Laptop and Desktop systems and offered them
    with SUSE Linux. Even when people ordered it with XP, Linux could be
    installed in less than 30 minutes. The same was true with IBM
    Thinkpads.

    IBM has Client for E-Business (C4EB) which employees can install on
    their thinkpads as an alternative to Windows XP. Pretty much every
    desktop or laptop used by IBM employees for work, is capable of
    running C4EB.

    In 2000, it could take 2-4 hours and 1-2 telephone calls to Red Hat to
    get Linux installed on a computer, because it wasn't designed to run
    Linux. Today, about 90% of the computers sold in the last 5 years are
    "Linux Ready". Commercially supported Linux can be installed on these
    machines in as little as 30 minutes, without a phone call, and can be
    loaded with optimal drivers for that hardware in less than 15 minutes.

    Apple created an operating system based on UNIX, and put it on display
    in retail stores. The computers based on this system are selling as
    fast as they can be produced. Apple can't keep up with the demand,
    even at prices as high as double those of comparable Windows Vista
    computers.

    The industry, including companies like IBM, Lenovo, HP, Toshiba, Sony,
    Dell, and Acer have worked very hard to make Linux easier to install
    and use.

    Microsoft has been working very hard to keep the general public from
    seeing these Linux powered PCs on retail shelves. They have been
    working very hard to keep the general public from knowing which
    computers are Linux Ready, and from learning that their computer is
    ready to run Linux.

    The objectives stated in the press release has been achieved. And
    much beyond that. Other innovations such as Live-CDs, VMWare Player,
    desktop virtualization, and appliances has made it possible for
    millions of people to use Linux, without giving up Windows.






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