Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content - Linux

This is a discussion on Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content - Linux ; Even though I'm an HDTV fanatic, it wasn't until this past weekend that I finally made the jump to an HD monitor.... Unfortunately, Hollywood isn't quite as thrilled about my new HD Media Dream Machine and they've decided to punish ...

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Thread: Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content

  1. Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content


    Even though I'm an HDTV fanatic, it wasn't until this past weekend
    that I finally made the jump to an HD monitor....

    Unfortunately, Hollywood isn't quite as thrilled about my new HD Media
    Dream Machine and they've decided to punish me by revoking my Watch
    Now privileges from Netflix (NFLX).

    [He finds he cannot use new monitor without agreeing to have his DRM
    "reset"...]

    Before nuking my entire digital library, I decided to call Netflix's
    technical support, to see if I could get to the bottom of my C00D11B1
    error message.

    When I called them they confirmed my worst fears. In order to access
    the Watch Now service, I had to give Microsoft's DRM sniffing program
    access to all of the files on my hard drive. If the software found any
    non-Netflix video files, it would revoke my rights to the content and
    invalidate the DRM. This means that I would lose all the movies that
    I've purchased from Amazon's (AMZN) Unbox, just to troubleshoot the
    issue....

    Netflix's software allows them to look at the video card, cables and
    the monitor that you are using and when they checked mine out, it was
    apparently a little too high def to pass their DRM filters. Because my
    computer allows me to send an unrestricted HDTV feed to my monitor,
    Hollywood has decided to revoke my ability to stream 480 resolution
    video files from Netflix. In order to fix my problem, Netflix
    recommended that I downgrade to a lower res VGA setup.

    As part of their agreement with Hollywood, Netflix uses a program
    called COPP (Certified Output Protection Protocol). COPP is made by
    Microsoft and the protocol restricts how you are able to transfer
    digital files off of your PC. When I ran COPP to identify the error on
    my machine, it gave me an ominous warning that "the exclusive
    semaphere is owned by another process."

    My Netflix technician told me that he had never heard of this
    particular error and thought that it was unique to my setup. When I
    consulted Microsoft, they suggested that I consult the creator of the
    program. Since Microsoft wrote the COPP software, I wasn't sure who to
    turn to after that....


    http://www.seekingalpha.com/article/...rotect-content

  2. Re: Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content


  3. Re: Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content

    nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu wrote:

    >
    > Even though I'm an HDTV fanatic, it wasn't until this past weekend
    > that I finally made the jump to an HD monitor....
    >
    > Unfortunately, Hollywood isn't quite as thrilled about my new HD Media
    > Dream Machine and they've decided to punish me by revoking my Watch
    > Now privileges from Netflix (NFLX).
    >
    > [He finds he cannot use new monitor without agreeing to have his DRM
    > "reset"...]
    >
    > Before nuking my entire digital library, I decided to call Netflix's
    > technical support, to see if I could get to the bottom of my C00D11B1
    > error message.
    >
    > When I called them they confirmed my worst fears. In order to access
    > the Watch Now service, I had to give Microsoft's DRM sniffing program
    > access to all of the files on my hard drive. If the software found any
    > non-Netflix video files, it would revoke my rights to the content and
    > invalidate the DRM. This means that I would lose all the movies that
    > I've purchased from Amazon's (AMZN) Unbox, just to troubleshoot the
    > issue....
    >
    > Netflix's software allows them to look at the video card, cables and
    > the monitor that you are using and when they checked mine out, it was
    > apparently a little too high def to pass their DRM filters. Because my
    > computer allows me to send an unrestricted HDTV feed to my monitor,
    > Hollywood has decided to revoke my ability to stream 480 resolution
    > video files from Netflix. In order to fix my problem, Netflix
    > recommended that I downgrade to a lower res VGA setup.
    >
    > As part of their agreement with Hollywood, Netflix uses a program
    > called COPP (Certified Output Protection Protocol). COPP is made by
    > Microsoft and the protocol restricts how you are able to transfer
    > digital files off of your PC. When I ran COPP to identify the error on
    > my machine, it gave me an ominous warning that "the exclusive
    > semaphere is owned by another process."
    >
    > My Netflix technician told me that he had never heard of this
    > particular error and thought that it was unique to my setup. When I
    > consulted Microsoft, they suggested that I consult the creator of the
    > program. Since Microsoft wrote the COPP software, I wasn't sure who to
    > turn to after that....
    >

    >
    >

    http://www.seekingalpha.com/article/...rotect-content

    And they wonder why people have the audacity to hack DRM restrictions. The
    stuff really scares the hell out of me and I can;t for the life of me
    understand why people even bother to buy into this crap...



    --

    Jerry McBride (jmcbride@mail-on.us)

  4. Re: Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content

    ____/ nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu on Friday 04 January 2008 16:43 : \____

    >
    >
    > Found this additional link:
    >

    http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2008/01...ying-customers

    They are trying very hard to make people understand the value of 'pirating' it
    would seem...

    Well done, RIAA/MPAA. You've already inspired Microsoft with pay-as-you-go
    Office+Windows, WGA and remote death switches. Vista market share in
    businesses after 1 years of hype: 1%.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | "I regularly SSH to God's brain and reboot"
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    17:05:01 up 25 days, 5:53, 4 users, load average: 1.09, 0.83, 0.88
    http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project

  5. Re: Hollywood Goes Too Far to Protect Content



    ____/ Jerry McBride on Friday 04 January 2008 17:06 : \____

    > And they wonder why people have the audacity to hack DRM restrictions. The
    > stuff really scares the hell out of me and I can;t for the life of me
    > understand why people even bother to buy into this crap...


    They don't know. Microsoft capitalises on such ignorance by using such things
    as 'default formats' that are proprietary. The company actually openly
    expressed this evil scheme in some leaked E-mails, IIRC (can't think of an
    easy way, e.g. a phrase, to find this ATM). Don't forget Gates' "the average
    PC user has the brain of a spidermonkey" remark, either.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Windows leaves me peckish
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    run-level 2 2007-12-10 11:12 last=
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine

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