Capital Letters in File and Directory Permission Bits - Linux

This is a discussion on Capital Letters in File and Directory Permission Bits - Linux ; Sometimes, if I issue the command: chmod +t mydir or chmod g+s mydir The permission bit on the directory appears as a capital letter, instead of a lower case letter. For example: drwxrwx--T 1 mark sticky 1024 Jan 1 1990 ...

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Thread: Capital Letters in File and Directory Permission Bits

  1. Capital Letters in File and Directory Permission Bits

    Sometimes, if I issue the command:

    chmod +t mydir

    or

    chmod g+s mydir

    The permission bit on the directory appears as a capital letter, instead of a
    lower case letter.

    For example:

    drwxrwx--T 1 mark sticky 1024 Jan 1 1990 mydir

    Why is there a capital T instead of a lower case one ?

    The same happens with the sgid bit, I sometimes get a capital S.

    drwxr-S--x 1 mark sticky 1024 Jan 1 1990 mydir

    What is happing, and what do the capitals in the permission bits mean ?

    Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
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  2. Re: Capital Letters in File and Directory Permission Bits

    markhobley@hotpop.deletethisbit.com (Mark Hobley) writes:

    > The permission bit on the directory appears as a capital letter, instead of a
    > lower case letter....
    > What is happing, and what do the capitals in the permission bits mean ?


    From:

    info coreutils ls

    The permissions listed are similar to symbolic mode specifications
    (*note Symbolic Modes:. But `ls' combines multiple bits into the
    third character of each set of permissions as follows:
    `s'
    If the setuid or setgid bit and the corresponding executable
    bit are both set.

    `S'
    If the setuid or setgid bit is set but the corresponding
    executable bit is not set.

    `t'
    If the sticky bit and the other-executable bit are both set.

    `T'
    If the sticky bit is set but the other-executable bit is not
    set.

    `x'
    If the executable bit is set and none of the above apply.

    `-'
    Otherwise.


    -- HASM

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