What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported toLinux but that's a language, not a API) - Linux

This is a discussion on What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported toLinux but that's a language, not a API) - Linux ; On Dec 30 2007, 3:27 pm, Thufir wrote: > On Sun, 30 Dec 2007 10:22:54 -0800, Rex Ballard wrote: > > The result is that many of those who did adopt C# prefer to only > > implement the Mono ...

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Thread: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported toLinux but that's a language, not a API)

  1. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is portedto Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    On Dec 30 2007, 3:27 pm, Thufir wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Dec 2007 10:22:54 -0800, Rex Ballard wrote:
    > > The result is that many of those who did adopt C# prefer to only
    > > implement the Mono subset, which gives them portability to Linux and
    > > other OSS supported platforms, as well as Windows, without having to
    > > worry about "painting ourselves into a corner" by implementing Windows-
    > > Only calls and features that are not supported on teh OSS platforms.

    >
    > IronRuby is, or will be, in a similar position? Or is it different?


    I would stick with the industry standard Ruby implemenations. Ruby is
    a widely used programming language which is supported on all
    platforms. Ruby on Rails provides an industry standard interfaces
    between Ruby and numerous databases.

    > -Thufir



  2. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is portedto Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    On Jan 2, 1:23 am, Thufir wrote:
    > On Dec 31 2007, 9:55 am, raylopez99 wrote:
    > [...]
    >
    > > And if it looks good, it is good, and your client is happy and you get
    > > paid. Sounds like something COLA members have never experienced.


    Most of us COLA members have to meet even higher requirements. It not
    only has to look good, it has to look good on all browsers, and on all
    workstations, including OS/X. It has to be extremely reliable, able to
    run for weeks, even months at a time without a reboot or failure. It
    has to perform extremely well, enough to handle millions of
    transactions per day, in some cases, millions of transactions per
    hour. It's not uncommon to have customers expecting several thousand
    transactions per SECOND. It's also necessary to be able to
    interconnect with other services, including other servers, and even
    other companies. This often means strict compliance with PUBLISHED
    industry standards. We have to support industry standard LDAP (not
    Active Directory), we have to support industry standard XML (no .NET
    binaries embedded), industry standard SOAP (no Microsoft extensions),
    WSDL, SOAP, and industry standard HTML and Web 2.0 using standard
    javascript.

    We often have to interact with UNIX systems, Mainframes, and Windows
    systems, and make them look, to the end user, like they were a single
    system, and like that system was running on their local workstation,
    whether that workstation runs Windows, OS/X, or Linux, and whether
    that browser is FireFox, Internet Explorer, or Netscape, or even
    Opera.

    Often, the "Client" has to interface several different businesses.
    They have to interconnect with providers, vendors, customers,
    shippers, and regulators. There might be as many as 20 different
    businesses involved.

    Sure, there is a place for the "VB/.NET guy", but it's only a small
    percentage of the total work to be done. The bulk of the work
    requires Java and requires that the java code be truly platform
    independent.

    > -thufir



  3. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    * Rex Ballard fired off this tart reply:

    > It not
    > only has to look good, it has to look good on all browsers, and on all
    > workstations, including OS/X. It has to be extremely reliable, able to
    > run for weeks, even months at a time without a reboot or failure. It
    > has to perform extremely well, enough to handle millions of
    > transactions per day, in some cases, millions of transactions per
    > hour. It's not uncommon to have customers expecting several thousand
    > transactions per SECOND. It's also necessary to be able to
    > interconnect with other services, including other servers, and even
    > other companies. This often means strict compliance with PUBLISHED
    > industry standards. We have to support industry standard LDAP (not
    > Active Directory), we have to support industry standard XML (no .NET
    > binaries embedded), industry standard SOAP (no Microsoft extensions),
    > WSDL, SOAP, and industry standard HTML and Web 2.0 using standard
    > javascript.
    >
    > We often have to interact with UNIX systems, Mainframes, and Windows
    > systems, and make them look, to the end user, like they were a single
    > system, and like that system was running on their local workstation,
    > whether that workstation runs Windows, OS/X, or Linux, and whether
    > that browser is FireFox, Internet Explorer, or Netscape, or even
    > Opera.
    >
    > Often, the "Client" has to interface several different businesses.
    > They have to interconnect with providers, vendors, customers,
    > shippers, and regulators. There might be as many as 20 different
    > businesses involved.
    >
    > Sure, there is a place for the "VB/.NET guy", but it's only a small
    > percentage of the total work to be done. The bulk of the work
    > requires Java and requires that the java code be truly platform
    > independent.


    MS is still only about 10%-15% of the IT industry. Very significant,
    but only a small part of the IT world. And it's more than just Java out
    there, too.

    --
    GNU/Linux rox, Tux!

  4. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is portedto Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    I find both of you hard to believe, though what you report is
    interesting. I doubt Java is the industry standard except for simple
    script files like a spinning web logo, and login stuff maybe. C#
    apparently has swept the industry by storm--look at the number of
    books on it. Java peaked in the mid to late 1990s. I think MSFT
    probably has the same market share in the programming environment as
    they do in desktop: around 90%.

    If you have links do provide them, but I doubt their authenticity if
    they are from Linux sources.

    BTW, logging onto my webmail account, I got this error today (for the
    first time), I think it's as simple as the Server timing out, but
    notice it runs on Apache (time to upsize the dB to Microsoft SQL
    Server!)

    RL

    message

    description The server encountered an internal error () that prevented
    it from fulfilling this request.

    exception
    java.lang.NullPointerException

    Apache Tomcat/4.1.24


    On Jan 2, 10:33*am, Linonut wrote:
    > * Rex Ballard fired off this tart reply:
    >
    >
    >
    > > It not
    > > only has to look good, it has to look good on all browsers, and on all
    > > workstations, including OS/X. It has to be extremely reliable, able to
    > > run for weeks, even months at a time without a reboot or failure. *It
    > > has to perform extremely well, enough to handle millions of
    > > transactions per day, in some cases, millions of transactions per
    > > hour. *It's not uncommon to have customers expecting several thousand
    > > transactions per SECOND. *It's also necessary to be able to
    > > interconnect with other services, including other servers, and even
    > > other companies. *This often means strict compliance with PUBLISHED
    > > industry standards. *We have to support industry standard LDAP (not
    > > Active Directory), we have to support industry standard XML (no .NET
    > > binaries embedded), industry standard SOAP (no Microsoft extensions),
    > > WSDL, SOAP, and industry standard HTML and Web 2.0 using standard
    > > javascript.

    >
    > > We often have to interact with UNIX systems, Mainframes, and Windows
    > > systems, and make them look, to the end user, like they were a single
    > > system, and like that system was running on their local workstation,
    > > whether that workstation runs Windows, OS/X, or Linux, and whether
    > > that browser is FireFox, Internet Explorer, or Netscape, or even
    > > Opera.

    >
    > > Often, the "Client" has to interface several different businesses.
    > > They have to interconnect with providers, vendors, customers,
    > > shippers, and regulators. *There might be as many as 20 different
    > > businesses involved.

    >
    > > Sure, there is a place for the "VB/.NET guy", but it's only a small
    > > percentage of the total work to be done. *The bulk of the work
    > > requires Java and requires that the java code be truly platform
    > > independent.

    >
    > MS is still only about 10%-15% of the IT industry. *Very significant,
    > but only a small part of the IT world. *And it's more than just Java out
    > there, too.
    >
    > --
    > GNU/Linux rox, Tux!



  5. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    raylopez99 wrote:
    > I find both of you hard to believe, though what you report is
    > interesting. I doubt Java is the industry standard except for simple
    > script files like a spinning web logo, and login stuff maybe. C#
    > apparently has swept the industry by storm--look at the number of
    > books on it. Java peaked in the mid to late 1990s. I think MSFT
    > probably has the same market share in the programming environment as
    > they do in desktop: around 90%.


    You think wrong. Perhaps you are confusing Java with Javascript.
    Java still commands more of the enterprise middleware market and will
    continue to do so until .Net is ported to big iron. .Net has certainly
    closed the gap in recent years, but a search on dice.com still turns up
    more Java jobs than .Net jobs.

    Later,

    Thad
    --
    Yeah, I drank the Open Source cool-aid... Unlike the other brand, it had
    all the ingredients on the label.

  6. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    On Jan 3, 3:52*pm, tha...@tux.glaci.delete-this.com wrote:
    > You think wrong. *Perhaps you are confusing Java with Javascript. *


    Yes, I thought they are the same more or less.

    > Java still commands more of the enterprise middleware market and will
    > continue to do so until .Net is ported to big iron. *.Net has certainly
    > closed the gap in recent years, but a search on dice.com still turns up
    > more Java jobs than .Net jobs.


    OK, I believe you (for some reason). But in my mind "close the gap" =
    won the race.

    Glad I'm learning programming in C#.NET and not Java.

    RL

  7. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    On Jan 5, 10:09*am, Rex Ballard wrote:

    > > Glad I'm learning programming in C#.NET and not Java.

    >
    > It probably won't hurt, but don't risk becoming a "One Trick Pony".
    > By the time you graduate from college, you want to have breadth and
    > depth in your background. *You want to know Windows, but you also want
    > to know Linux and OS/X as well. *If you can get your hands on it, you
    > also want to get familiar with UNIX servers such as AIX, Solaris, and/
    > or HP_UX.


    What about Amiga and BeOS Rex?

    >
    > You also want to make sure that you know more than just the GUI. *You
    > need to know SQL programming LANGUAGE, not just how to play a video
    > game that just happens to generate a trivial database as a side
    > effect.


    SQL is not a programming language. It does have Stored Procedures but
    lacks (from what I can tell, I could be wrong) conditional logic
    (IF...THEN).

    >
    > You should also understand the physics of computers. *How fast does a
    > hard drive spin? *How many bytes does the system read in one spin?
    > How many instructions can be done during that one spin? *How long does
    > it take to move memory into cache? *How many CPU instructions can be
    > executed in that time. *This will help you think in terms of the big
    > picture.
    >


    OK, now you're showing your nuttiness. You remind me of the Roman
    architect Vitruvius who specified so many skills needed to become a
    master architect that even he admitted it would take more than a
    lifetime to master. So you can take your route, or, just learn .NET
    and be good to go. Choice is yours.

    RL

  8. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    raylopez99 wrote:

    > SQL is not a programming language. *It does have Stored Procedures but
    > lacks (from what I can tell, I could be wrong) conditional logic
    > (IF...THEN).


    http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.0/s...nditional.html

    9.13. Conditional Expressions

    This section describes the SQL-compliant conditional expressions available
    in PostgreSQL.

    Tip: If your needs go beyond the capabilities of these conditional
    expressions you might want to consider writing a stored procedure in a more
    expressive programming language.

    9.13.1. CASE

    The SQL CASE expression is a generic conditional expression, similar to
    if/else statements in other languages:

    CASE WHEN condition THEN result
    [WHEN ...]
    [ELSE result]
    END

    CASE clauses can be used wherever an expression is valid. condition is an
    expression that returns a boolean result. If the result is true then the
    value of the CASE expression is the result that follows the condition. If
    the result is false any subsequent WHEN clauses are searched in the same
    manner. If no WHEN condition is true then the value of the case expression
    is the result in the ELSE clause. If the ELSE clause is omitted and no
    condition matches, the result is null.

    --
    Regards,

    Gregory.
    Gentoo Linux - Penguin Power

  9. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ??to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    raylopez99 wrote:
    >
    > What about Amiga and BeOS Rex?


    Last I checked Amiga and BeOS were not running a substantial slice of
    enterprise computing; the legacy Unix is (at least where it hasn't
    already been converted to Linux).

    > architect Vitruvius who specified so many skills needed to become a
    > master architect that even he admitted it would take more than a
    > lifetime to master. So you can take your route, or, just learn .NET
    > and be good to go. Choice is yours.


    There is certainly nothing wrong with specializing... just as long
    as you are willing to accept a narrower range of employment
    opportunities. .Net has certainly expanded to where it now offers
    plenty of opportunities, but I personally would still combine it
    with at least some Java experience just cover your bases.

    Thad
    --
    Yeah, I drank the Open Source cool-aid... Unlike the other brand, it had
    all the ingredients on the label.

  10. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    On Jan 7, 3:29*am, Gregory Shearman wrote:
    > raylopez99 wrote:
    > > SQL is not a programming language. *It does have Stored Procedures but
    > > lacks (from what I can tell, I could be wrong) conditional logic
    > > (IF...THEN).

    >
    > http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.0/s...nditional.html
    >
    > 9.13. Conditional Expressions
    >


    Yeah, sorry I forgot about IF...Then. OK I modify my statement then
    by saying SQL doesn't have a WHILE or DO...WHILE or FOR EVERY clause.

    Doesnt' matter though--this thread is about loserdom...as in Linux
    loser.

    RL

  11. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ??to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    * thad05@tux.glaci.delete-this.com fired off this tart reply:

    > There is certainly nothing wrong with specializing... just as long
    > as you are willing to accept a narrower range of employment
    > opportunities. .Net has certainly expanded to where it now offers
    > plenty of opportunities, but I personally would still combine it
    > with at least some Java experience just cover your bases.


    ..NET (and C#, which is up to version 3.0) will certainly keep you on the
    training-seminar track. It's a real stable cross-vendor platform, isn't
    it ;0

    Side note: I've been subscribing to Dr. Dobb's Journal for the last
    decade or so. Today it is a pitiful shell of its former self. It is
    almost a People Magazine of programming.

    Worse, about half the articles now are about .NET topics, and most of
    the rest are about "agile" programming. One thing you do learn about
    ..NET though, from Dr. Dobb's -- it is Microsoft's baby, and Microsoft
    definitely churns it quite a bit. They embrace and extend their own
    stuff, and thereby extinguish your hope of untying yourself from
    Microsoft, if you want to support .NET.

    --
    This sig has expired. Please reactivate your sig by paying $0.25
    and entering the 30-character activation key that will be emailed to
    your account.

  12. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ??to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    Linonut writes:

    > * thad05@tux.glaci.delete-this.com fired off this tart reply:
    >
    >> There is certainly nothing wrong with specializing... just as long
    >> as you are willing to accept a narrower range of employment
    >> opportunities. .Net has certainly expanded to where it now offers
    >> plenty of opportunities, but I personally would still combine it
    >> with at least some Java experience just cover your bases.

    >
    > .NET (and C#, which is up to version 3.0) will certainly keep you on the
    > training-seminar track. It's a real stable cross-vendor platform, isn't
    > it ;0
    >
    > Side note: I've been subscribing to Dr. Dobb's Journal for the last
    > decade or so. Today it is a pitiful shell of its former self. It is
    > almost a People Magazine of programming.
    >
    > Worse, about half the articles now are about .NET topics, and most of
    > the rest are about "agile" programming. One thing you do learn about
    > .NET though, from Dr. Dobb's -- it is Microsoft's baby, and Microsoft
    > definitely churns it quite a bit. They embrace and extend their own
    > stuff, and thereby extinguish your hope of untying yourself from
    > Microsoft, if you want to support .NET.


    Like Gnome and Mono?

  13. Re: What Linux programming tools for SQL are there? (MySQL is ported ?to Linux but that's a language, not a API)

    In article
    <01bd0f6c-342d-4399-aa11-45923ed75114@x69g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    raylopez99 wrote:
    > > You should also understand the physics of computers. *How fast does a
    > > hard drive spin? *How many bytes does the system read in one spin?
    > > How many instructions can be done during that one spin? *How long does
    > > it take to move memory into cache? *How many CPU instructions can be
    > > executed in that time. *This will help you think in terms of the big
    > > picture.
    > >

    >
    > OK, now you're showing your nuttiness. You remind me of the Roman
    > architect Vitruvius who specified so many skills needed to become a
    > master architect that even he admitted it would take more than a
    > lifetime to master. So you can take your route, or, just learn .NET
    > and be good to go. Choice is yours.



    So you just learn .NET, and neglect to understand how things actually
    work. You get a job building the back end to a web site. The web site
    makes it to Slashdot, and the front page of Digg. The site grinds to a
    stop under the load.

    Your boss says you need to fix the site so that doesn't happen again.
    Unless you know how the parts of the system work, including performance
    characteristics, you'll have a hard time fixing the site in a way the
    boss will be happy with (unless he's happy with expensive solutions like
    "buy more servers and load balance them").

    --
    --Tim Smith

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