Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter - Linux

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  1. Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    Note Linux is losing its mojo.

    Drink the Kool Aid you Linux cultards (tards).

    RL

    November 29, 2007
    Cult Watch 2007: Who's Drinking the Kool-Aid?
    By Mike Elgan


    As we wind down another year in technology, it's a good time to check
    in on the cults and see how they're doing.

    For companies who inspire them, user cults are nice because they
    motivate customers to overlook strategic blunders, exaggerate product
    successes and -- most importantly -- walk the earth "virally"
    marketing products without pay.

    Cult members themselves get an enhanced feeling of self-worth through
    group association. "I'm better than you! I have an iPhone!" Consumers
    can become one of the "chosen people" for $399, plus a two-year
    contract.

    Let's have a look at the major tech cults, and see how they're doing.

    Apple

    The biggest and most religiously zealous of the cults, of course, is
    Apple. The company and cult had a banner year, highlighted by the
    shipment of the iPhone and a new version of OS X, among other things.
    On balance, longtime devotees are just as faithful as always, but the
    iPhone phenomenon and Mac conversion from Windows brought new members
    into the fold. They've made missteps (Apple TV, security issues,
    iPhone "bricking" controversy, etc.) But the iPhone and Leopard are so
    sublimely transcendent that such minor problems pale in comparison.

    In 2007, Apple moved from 4 1/2 to 4 3/4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid on the
    cult scale (from zero to five cups, five being maximum).

    Microsoft

    It's hard to inspire a cult when you're an uncharismatic market share
    leader. Nonetheless, a Microsoft cult does exist. In 2007, however,
    the group lost a lot of members, and those who remain have lost faith.
    Why? In a word: Vista.

    This false prophet of an operating system is slow, buggy, confusing
    and problematic. Vista's main benefit to the cult is that it makes
    members realize how much they liked XP. Microsoft has been slowly
    improving its Windows Mobile OS, and various online offerings, but
    these incremental gains mean little when Apple and Google are
    dominating the cultosphere so thoroughly with their respective
    products and services.

    The cult got a minor revelation in the form of the new Zunes, which
    turned out to be surprisingly nice. Unfortunately, Apple preemptively
    PWNED this whole line with its new iPods.

    The Microsoft cult plummets this year from two Dixie cups of Kool-Aid
    to just one.

    Linux

    Success is hurting the Linux cult. As Linux grows more respectable in
    enterprises, its cult value wanes. Huge companies like IBM, HP and
    others now dominate public enthusiasm for the platform, which erodes
    its outlaw image and makes it harder to enlist new cult members. On
    the consumer desktop, it seems, pretty much everyone who is going to
    embrace it already has. So the faithful remain so, but their numbers
    are at best remaining constant and at worse, declining.

    The Linux cult moved this year from 4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to 3
    1/2.

    Google

    The Cult of Google was pulled in both directions in 2007. On the one
    hand, Google keeps hitting grand slams by increasing Gmail storage
    capacity, offering super great mobile applications, providing a near
    perfect platform for maps mashups, and continuing to deliver great
    search without bloated UI.

    They've also unveiled a staggering number of promising new
    initiatives, such as OpenSocial and Android. On the other hand, Google
    is becoming so big, so rich and so powerful that it's hard to be too
    devoted to the cause. Their stated desire and actual practice of
    gathering and retaining as much private user data further erodes
    religious support.

    On balance, however, they're up. Google moved this year from 3 Dixie
    cups of Kool-Aid to 3 1/2.

    Amazon

    Is there an Amazon cult?

    Absolutely. This small but loyal congregation was given a huge boost
    late this year by the Kindle, which is a cult enabler. Yes, Amazon's
    first physical product is a nice gadget. But its over-riding purpose
    is to interact with the Amazon.com Web site. Features such as free
    wireless search of the Kindle store, one-minute book downloads and the
    ability to write and post reviews directly on the device is like the
    coming of the Messiah for Amazon cultists.

    The Amazon cult is moving up like the Jeffersons, from 1/2 a Dixie cup
    of Kool-Aid to 2 cups.

    Palm

    The only suicide cult among the bunch, Palm has been slowly taking its
    own life for two years, and, as a result, cult members are losing
    faith. A conspicuous lack of innovation in precisely the space (smart
    phones) where Apple is "changing the world," has made carrying a Treo
    -- which used to be a badge of pride -- almost embarrassing. Other
    missteps, such as promoting, then killing, the Foleo, made remaining
    cult members question the divine origins of leader Jeff Hawkins.

    The Palm cult moved in 2007 from 3 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to just 1.

    BlackBerry

    Two factors have boosted BlackBerry Cult devotion. First, real
    innovation in Pearl and Curve lines have thrilled longtime cult
    members, and given them something to fawn over.

    The second factor is the rise of the iPhone, which places RIM devices
    in a kind of underdog position, at least in terms of trendiness.
    CrackBerry addicts are as addicted as ever, and are still having fun
    with their devices.

    The Cult of BlackBerry moved this year from 3 1/2 Dixie cups of Kool-
    Aid to 4.

    In addition to writing for Datamation, where this column first
    appeared, Mike Elgan is a technology writer and former editor of
    Windows Magazine.



    Send Feedback

  2. Re: Windummie users named as bum boyees by savvy IT reporter

    Michoshaft Asstroturfer raylopez99 wrote one behalf of micoshaft
    corporation:

    > N


    Note Windummies are losing their mumbo jumbo.

    Drink the Kool Aid you Windummy cultards (tards).

    No chrismas presents for you wintards.

    Santa Claus is gonna poop down your shoots
    and give it a miss
    while true Linux believers will get plenty
    of Christmas presents this Christmas

    All the presents are now ready and waiting to be downloaded.
    http://www.livecdlist.com
    http://www.distrowatch.com



  3. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 11:35:10 -0800, raylopez99 wrote:

    > Note Linux is losing its mojo.
    >
    > Drink the Kool Aid you Linux cultards (tards).
    >
    > RL



    Piss off asswipe, you can't even properly understand your own references.

    >
    > November 29, 2007
    > Cult Watch 2007: Who's Drinking the Kool-Aid? By Mike Elgan
    >
    >
    > As we wind down another year in technology, it's a good time to check in
    > on the cults and see how they're doing.
    >
    > For companies who inspire them, user cults are nice because they
    > motivate customers to overlook strategic blunders, exaggerate product
    > successes and -- most importantly -- walk the earth "virally" marketing
    > products without pay.
    >
    > Cult members themselves get an enhanced feeling of self-worth through
    > group association. "I'm better than you! I have an iPhone!" Consumers
    > can become one of the "chosen people" for $399, plus a two-year
    > contract.
    >
    > Let's have a look at the major tech cults, and see how they're doing.
    >
    > Apple
    >
    > The biggest and most religiously zealous of the cults, of course, is
    > Apple. The company and cult had a banner year, highlighted by the
    > shipment of the iPhone and a new version of OS X, among other things. On
    > balance, longtime devotees are just as faithful as always, but the
    > iPhone phenomenon and Mac conversion from Windows brought new members
    > into the fold. They've made missteps (Apple TV, security issues, iPhone
    > "bricking" controversy, etc.) But the iPhone and Leopard are so
    > sublimely transcendent that such minor problems pale in comparison.
    >
    > In 2007, Apple moved from 4 1/2 to 4 3/4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid on the
    > cult scale (from zero to five cups, five being maximum).
    >
    > Microsoft
    >
    > It's hard to inspire a cult when you're an uncharismatic market share
    > leader. Nonetheless, a Microsoft cult does exist. In 2007, however, the
    > group lost a lot of members, and those who remain have lost faith. Why?
    > In a word: Vista.
    >
    > This false prophet of an operating system is slow, buggy, confusing and
    > problematic. Vista's main benefit to the cult is that it makes members
    > realize how much they liked XP. Microsoft has been slowly improving its
    > Windows Mobile OS, and various online offerings, but these incremental
    > gains mean little when Apple and Google are dominating the cultosphere
    > so thoroughly with their respective products and services.
    >
    > The cult got a minor revelation in the form of the new Zunes, which
    > turned out to be surprisingly nice. Unfortunately, Apple preemptively
    > PWNED this whole line with its new iPods.
    >
    > The Microsoft cult plummets this year from two Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to
    > just one.
    >
    > Linux
    >
    > Success is hurting the Linux cult. As Linux grows more respectable in
    > enterprises, its cult value wanes. Huge companies like IBM, HP and
    > others now dominate public enthusiasm for the platform, which erodes its
    > outlaw image and makes it harder to enlist new cult members. On the
    > consumer desktop, it seems, pretty much everyone who is going to embrace
    > it already has. So the faithful remain so, but their numbers are at best
    > remaining constant and at worse, declining.
    >
    > The Linux cult moved this year from 4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to 3 1/2.
    >
    > Google
    >
    > The Cult of Google was pulled in both directions in 2007. On the one
    > hand, Google keeps hitting grand slams by increasing Gmail storage
    > capacity, offering super great mobile applications, providing a near
    > perfect platform for maps mashups, and continuing to deliver great
    > search without bloated UI.
    >
    > They've also unveiled a staggering number of promising new initiatives,
    > such as OpenSocial and Android. On the other hand, Google is becoming so
    > big, so rich and so powerful that it's hard to be too devoted to the
    > cause. Their stated desire and actual practice of gathering and
    > retaining as much private user data further erodes religious support.
    >
    > On balance, however, they're up. Google moved this year from 3 Dixie
    > cups of Kool-Aid to 3 1/2.
    >
    > Amazon
    >
    > Is there an Amazon cult?
    >
    > Absolutely. This small but loyal congregation was given a huge boost
    > late this year by the Kindle, which is a cult enabler. Yes, Amazon's
    > first physical product is a nice gadget. But its over-riding purpose is
    > to interact with the Amazon.com Web site. Features such as free wireless
    > search of the Kindle store, one-minute book downloads and the ability to
    > write and post reviews directly on the device is like the coming of the
    > Messiah for Amazon cultists.
    >
    > The Amazon cult is moving up like the Jeffersons, from 1/2 a Dixie cup
    > of Kool-Aid to 2 cups.
    >
    > Palm
    >
    > The only suicide cult among the bunch, Palm has been slowly taking its
    > own life for two years, and, as a result, cult members are losing faith.
    > A conspicuous lack of innovation in precisely the space (smart phones)
    > where Apple is "changing the world," has made carrying a Treo -- which
    > used to be a badge of pride -- almost embarrassing. Other missteps, such
    > as promoting, then killing, the Foleo, made remaining cult members
    > question the divine origins of leader Jeff Hawkins.
    >
    > The Palm cult moved in 2007 from 3 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to just 1.
    >
    > BlackBerry
    >
    > Two factors have boosted BlackBerry Cult devotion. First, real
    > innovation in Pearl and Curve lines have thrilled longtime cult members,
    > and given them something to fawn over.
    >
    > The second factor is the rise of the iPhone, which places RIM devices in
    > a kind of underdog position, at least in terms of trendiness. CrackBerry
    > addicts are as addicted as ever, and are still having fun with their
    > devices.
    >
    > The Cult of BlackBerry moved this year from 3 1/2 Dixie cups of Kool-
    > Aid to 4.
    >
    > In addition to writing for Datamation, where this column first appeared,
    > Mike Elgan is a technology writer and former editor of Windows Magazine.
    >
    >
    >
    > Send Feedback






    --
    Rick

  4. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 11:35:10 -0800, raylopez99 wrote:

    > Note Linux is losing its mojo.


    Not that I noticed. And unlike you, I actually *know* Linux, and use it.

    >
    > Drink the Kool Aid you Linux cultards (tards).
    >
    > RL
    >
    > November 29, 2007
    > Cult Watch 2007: Who's Drinking the Kool-Aid?
    > By Mike Elgan



    And exactly why should we take the word of this bloke?



    > Linux
    >
    > Success is hurting the Linux cult. As Linux grows more respectable in
    > enterprises, its cult value wanes. Huge companies like IBM, HP and
    > others now dominate public enthusiasm for the platform, which erodes
    > its outlaw image and makes it harder to enlist new cult members. On


    Uniformed nonsense.

    > the consumer desktop, it seems, pretty much everyone who is going to
    > embrace it already has. So the faithful remain so, but their numbers
    > are at best remaining constant and at worse, declining.


    Nonsense again. Linux is becoming more mainstream, and gaining users.

    >
    > The Linux cult moved this year from 4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to 3
    > 1/2.


    All this bull**** about Linux being a cult is just that - bull****. Open
    source might be considered a way of life or philosophy, but it's not a
    religion.

    --
    Kier


  5. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Dec 22, 2:19*pm, Kier wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 11:35:10 -0800, raylopez99 wrote:
    > > Note Linux is losing its mojo.

    >
    > Not that I noticed. And unlike you, I actually *know* Linux, and use it.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Drink the Kool Aid you Linux cultards (tards).

    >
    > > RL

    >
    > > *November 29, 2007
    > > Cult Watch 2007: Who's Drinking the Kool-Aid?
    > > By Mike Elgan

    >
    > And exactly why should we take the word of this bloke?
    >
    >
    >
    > > Linux

    >
    > > Success is hurting the Linux cult. As Linux grows more respectable in
    > > enterprises, its cult value wanes. Huge companies like IBM, HP and
    > > others now dominate public enthusiasm for the platform, which erodes
    > > its outlaw image and makes it harder to enlist new cult members. On

    >
    > Uniformed nonsense.
    >
    > > the consumer desktop, it seems, pretty much everyone who is going to
    > > embrace it already has. So the faithful remain so, but their numbers
    > > are at best remaining constant and at worse, declining.

    >
    > Nonsense again. Linux is becoming more mainstream, and gaining users.
    >
    >
    >
    > > The Linux cult moved this year from 4 Dixie cups of Kool-Aid to 3
    > > 1/2.

    >
    > All this bull**** about Linux being a cult is just that - bull****. Open
    > source might be considered a way of life or philosophy, but it's not a
    > religion.
    >
    > --
    > Kier


    Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares
    to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    ideology.

  6. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    * eatfastnoodle fired off this tart reply:

    > Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    > attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares
    > to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    > be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    > places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    > choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    > ideology.


    I notice you count yourself in that group.

    Count me out.

    Now start counting Microsoft "nazis".

    --
    Tux rox!

  7. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 21:11:16 -0800, eatfastnoodle wrote:

    > Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    > attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares


    A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such a surprise in
    any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or Windows. And no, that doesn't make
    it a religion. A cause, possibly, but there are many causes far more
    strident.

    > to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    > be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    > places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    > choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    > ideology.


    You may be. I'm not.

    --
    Kier

    --
    Kier


  8. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    Kier wrote:
    > eatfastnoodle wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness
    >> its members attack anything or anybody that's different from
    >> them. Anybody dares

    >
    > A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such a
    > surprise in any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or Windows.
    > And no, that doesn't make it a religion. A cause, possibly,
    > but there are many causes far more strident.
    >
    >> to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its
    >> chest will be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup,
    >> in any nerd-gathering places. Regardless of the merit of
    >> criticism, we want open, we want choice, but we are willing
    >> to be nazi toward those who don't share our ideology.

    >
    > You may be. I'm not.


    It concerns me when someone comes with vague accusations without
    specific examples. Such is definitely not expressions or
    supporting expressions or related to comradery support of this
    newgroup's charter, "For discussion of the benefits of Linux
    compared to other operating systems." (Ref.
    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ and
    Paragraph 1.4)

    --
    HPT

  9. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 08:39:57 -0700, High Plains Thumper wrote:

    > Kier wrote:
    >> eatfastnoodle wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness
    >>> its members attack anything or anybody that's different from
    >>> them. Anybody dares

    >>
    >> A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such a
    >> surprise in any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or Windows.
    >> And no, that doesn't make it a religion. A cause, possibly,
    >> but there are many causes far more strident.
    >>
    >>> to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its
    >>> chest will be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup,
    >>> in any nerd-gathering places. Regardless of the merit of
    >>> criticism, we want open, we want choice, but we are willing
    >>> to be nazi toward those who don't share our ideology.

    >>
    >> You may be. I'm not.

    >
    > It concerns me when someone comes with vague accusations without
    > specific examples. Such is definitely not expressions or
    > supporting expressions or related to comradery support of this
    > newgroup's charter, "For discussion of the benefits of Linux
    > compared to other operating systems." (Ref.
    > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ and
    > Paragraph 1.4)


    Unfortunately, the 'charter' is not really binding, nor so far as I know,
    official.

    --
    Kier


  10. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 11:35:10 -0800, raylopez99 wrote:

    > Note Linux is losing its mojo.
    >
    > Drink the Kool Aid you Linux cultards (tards).
    >
    > RL
    >


    Go away you pathetic loser......

  11. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    Kier wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >> Kier wrote:
    >>> eatfastnoodle wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the
    >>>> viciousness its members attack anything or anybody
    >>>> that's different from them. Anybody dares
    >>>
    >>> A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such
    >>> a surprise in any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or
    >>> Windows. And no, that doesn't make it a religion. A cause,
    >>> possibly, but there are many causes far more strident.
    >>>
    >>>> to criticize anything that has a open label attached to
    >>>> its chest will be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in
    >>>> newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering places. Regardless of
    >>>> the merit of criticism, we want open, we want choice,
    >>>> but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't
    >>>> share our ideology.
    >>> You may be. I'm not.

    >>
    >> It concerns me when someone comes with vague accusations
    >> without specific examples. Such is definitely not
    >> expressions or supporting expressions or related to
    >> comradery support of this newgroup's charter, "For
    >> discussion of the benefits of Linux compared to other
    >> operating systems." (Ref.
    >> http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ and
    >> Paragraph 1.4)

    >
    > Unfortunately, the 'charter' is not really binding, nor so far
    > as I know, official.


    It is binding in the sense that many ISP's have etiquette rules
    in place through their AUP's or TOS's. That is to abide by the
    charter established for the newsgroup. Charter is officially
    established and FAQ is officially posted on a recognised website
    repository for such.

    Following substantiates that the charter is official. See

    ftp://ftp.isc.org/pub/usenet/news.an...ewgroups/comp/
    comp.os.linux-reorg3

    or http://tinyurl.com/egj8s

    for background.

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.os.linux.advocacy/
    browse_frm/thread/3a36eaf74cc73f/98fda11a5b066043?hl
    =en&lnk=gst&q=charter+official#98fda11a5b066043

    or http://tinyurl.com/2cvzn7

    starting with post #15 has a good explanation.

    Since COLA is a public and unmoderated forum, a certain amount of
    deviation can be tolerated. Much of this falls under
    camaraderie. People are people and such is to be expected. As
    long as there is a general consensus, such is not considered as
    off-topic.

    However, trolling to be disruptive, insultive, libelous, etc. is
    not conducive or constructive to normal, healthy conversation.
    It destroys camaraderie and chases people away from the forum,
    who otherwise would be healthy, contributing members.

    Thus, the appropriate way to deal with abuse is complaint to the
    abuser's ISP. Some ISP's may seem to be non-responsive. But if
    sufficient enough complaints are received, will usually net the
    desired effect of bringing abuse to a close.

    Prior to that, sometimes a simple warning by letting abuser know
    the charter helps. If that does not work, it gives more
    ammunition to show ISP that user has been supplied the charter.

    --
    HPT

  12. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    In article ,
    High Plains Thumper wrote:
    > > Unfortunately, the 'charter' is not really binding, nor so far
    > > as I know, official.

    >
    > It is binding in the sense that many ISP's have etiquette rules
    > in place through their AUP's or TOS's. That is to abide by the
    > charter established for the newsgroup. Charter is officially


    Too bad you aren't at such an ISP.

    --
    --Tim Smith

  13. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Dec 23, 8:47*am, Kier wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 21:11:16 -0800, eatfastnoodle wrote:
    > > Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    > > attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares

    >
    > A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such a surprise in
    > any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or Windows. And no, that doesn't make
    > it a religion. A cause, possibly, but there are many causes far more
    > strident.
    >
    > > to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    > > be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    > > places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    > > choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    > > ideology.

    >
    > You may be. I'm not.
    >


    Fundamentalist always consider themselves humanitarian. You are no
    exception.


  14. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 12:37:23 -0800, eatfastnoodle wrote:

    > On Dec 23, 8:47*am, Kier wrote:
    >> On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 21:11:16 -0800, eatfastnoodle wrote:
    >> > Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    >> > attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares

    >>
    >> A few extreme characters might be so, but that's not such a surprise in
    >> any advocacy group, be it Linux, Mac or Windows. And no, that doesn't make
    >> it a religion. A cause, possibly, but there are many causes far more
    >> strident.
    >>
    >> > to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    >> > be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    >> > places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    >> > choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    >> > ideology.

    >>
    >> You may be. I'm not.
    >>

    >
    > Fundamentalist always consider themselves humanitarian. You are no
    > exception.


    Nonsense. I am no 'cultist' or 'nazi', and I don't use Linux for some
    religious reason. I like it, and find it better than Windows. I also agree
    with many (though not all) of the ideals of the FOSS community. But I
    wouldn't want to force it on anyone who really doesn't want it. I just
    happen to think it's by far the better OS.

    --
    Kier


  15. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Dec 23, 5:01*pm, Kier wrote:
    >
    > Nonsense. I am no 'cultist' or 'nazi', and I don't use Linux for some
    > religious reason. I like it, and find it better than Windows. I also agree
    > with many (though not all) of the ideals of the FOSS community. But I
    > wouldn't want to force it on anyone who really doesn't want it. I just
    > happen to think it's by far the better OS.


    Kier you're the opener (these are American baseball metaphors, as well
    as negotiation metaphors). The opener is the warm and fuzzy idealist
    that the Linux 'tards use to gain acceptance with the mainstream.
    It's a trap for the unwary. The opener is smooth and likeable, a real
    crowd pleaser. Typically an aged pitcher or aged negotiator who is in
    their autumn years. They talk the talk in broad brushstrokes and the
    don't have a killer repertoire or single knockout pitch anymore, just
    a medley of decent pitches. Then comes the middle reliever and the
    closer. These two are nasty, especially the closer. They seek to
    dominate and finish the game or negotiation with a win. Think racist
    John Rocker at his peak or dead serious Mariano Rivera or some other
    closer than doesn't mind being booed, but just wins.

    What will the closers of Linux do? They will disrupt the software
    industry. They will put a generation of coders out of work. Most
    importantly, they will decrease the stock price of MSFT, and as a
    Microsoft shareholder I resent that.

    And what will we gain? Certainly not better code, certainly not fewer
    viruses--to the contrary, more sloppy code and more viruses. Who do
    you trust more: an amateur pilot who flies a few times a year and is
    always a bit rusty, or a professional? And which code is easier to
    insert a virus into: a closed binary executable that has been
    scrambled prior to release so it's nearly impossible to follow the 1s
    and 0s even if you decrypt it line by line, or, an open source, ASCII
    text source code? Clearly the latter. The only reason Linux doesn't
    have viruses is that the virus writers don't target it, since it has
    such pathetic market share.

    Dems da facts Kier. And that's my pitch against Linux.

    RL

  16. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 14:52:18 -0800, raylopez99 wrote:

    > On Dec 23, 5:01*pm, Kier wrote:
    >>
    >> Nonsense. I am no 'cultist' or 'nazi', and I don't use Linux for some
    >> religious reason. I like it, and find it better than Windows. I also agree
    >> with many (though not all) of the ideals of the FOSS community. But I
    >> wouldn't want to force it on anyone who really doesn't want it. I just
    >> happen to think it's by far the better OS.

    >
    > Kier you're the opener (these are American baseball metaphors, as well
    > as negotiation metaphors). The opener is the warm and fuzzy idealist
    > that the Linux 'tards use to gain acceptance with the mainstream.


    First off, boyo, we are not Linux 'tards'.

    > It's a trap for the unwary. The opener is smooth and likeable, a real
    > crowd pleaser. Typically an aged pitcher or aged negotiator who is in
    > their autumn years. They talk the talk in broad brushstrokes and the
    > don't have a killer repertoire or single knockout pitch anymore, just
    > a medley of decent pitches. Then comes the middle reliever and the
    > closer. These two are nasty, especially the closer. They seek to
    > dominate and finish the game or negotiation with a win. Think racist
    > John Rocker at his peak or dead serious Mariano Rivera or some other
    > closer than doesn't mind being booed, but just wins.


    This isn't baseball, fool.

    >
    > What will the closers of Linux do? They will disrupt the software
    > industry. They will put a generation of coders out of work. Most


    Not so.

    > importantly, they will decrease the stock price of MSFT, and as a
    > Microsoft shareholder I resent that.


    Tough. Welcome to the new world.

    >
    > And what will we gain? Certainly not better code, certainly not fewer
    > viruses--to the contrary, more sloppy code and more viruses. Who do


    Who says so? You? Can you show us this so-called 'sloppy code'?

    > you trust more: an amateur pilot who flies a few times a year and is


    Linux coders are not 'amateur'.

    > always a bit rusty, or a professional? And which code is easier to
    > insert a virus into: a closed binary executable that has been
    > scrambled prior to release so it's nearly impossible to follow the 1s
    > and 0s even if you decrypt it line by line, or, an open source, ASCII
    > text source code? Clearly the latter. The only reason Linux doesn't
    > have viruses is that the virus writers don't target it, since it has
    > such pathetic market share.


    Not so.

    >
    > Dems da facts Kier. And that's my pitch against Linux.


    None of which will convince anyone with half a brain. Because you have
    presented no 'facts', merely your opinion.

    --
    Kier




  17. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    On 2007-12-23, Linonut claimed:
    > * eatfastnoodle fired off this tart reply:
    >
    >> Yes, it's a religion. At least in term of the viciousness its members
    >> attack anything or anybody that's different from them. Anybody dares
    >> to criticize anything that has a open label attached to its chest will
    >> be verbally lynched in blogsphere, in newsgroup, in any nerd-gathering
    >> places. Regardless of the merit of criticism, we want open, we want
    >> choice, but we are willing to be nazi toward those who don't share our
    >> ideology.

    >
    > I notice you count yourself in that group.
    >
    > Count me out.
    >
    > Now start counting Microsoft "nazis".


    The funny thing to me is that these "missionaries" come over to a linux
    group and try to save the "heathens" by preaching the Gospel of Saint
    Bill. They do so using methods such as trying to show linux users the
    "error of their ways" in various areas, and by claiming linux users
    worship a false God.

    They have the biblical log in their eyes as they tell us to remove the
    mote from our own.

    --
    We missed you! We'll aim better next time.

  18. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    * Sinister Midget fired off this tart reply:

    > The funny thing to me is that these "missionaries" come over to a linux
    > group and try to save the "heathens" by preaching the Gospel of Saint
    > Bill. They do so using methods such as trying to show linux users the
    > "error of their ways" in various areas, and by claiming linux users
    > worship a false God.
    >
    > They have the biblical log in their eyes as they tell us to remove the
    > mote from our own.


    If he weren't such a Hypocrite, Saint Bill of the Greasy Cheeseburger
    would grab ahold of each Linux Leper, and give them a big kiss, just
    like Saint Francis the Sissy ... I mean, of Assissi.

    Meanwhile, Saint Stephen of the Balmy transubstantiates chairs into
    flying objects, while uttering imprecations about "****ing kill Google".

    --
    Tux rox!

  19. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    Kier wrote:

    > First off, boyo, we are not Linux 'tards'.


    But you are: freetards.





  20. Re: Linux users named a 'cult' by savvy IT reporter

    DFS :
    > Kier wrote:
    >
    >> First off, boyo, we are not Linux 'tards'.

    >
    > But you are: freetards.


    Make a flag, I'll carry it.

    --
    I once decorated my apartment entirely in ten foot salad forks!!

    www.websterscafe.com

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