Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent - Linux

This is a discussion on Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent - Linux ; Following are the Synaptic patch management downloads from my system for month of December 2007. I have the system notify me when are available through an icon in the task bar and notification pop-up. I then click on the icon, ...

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  1. Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent

    Following are the Synaptic patch management downloads from my
    system for month of December 2007. I have the system notify me
    when are available through an icon in the task bar and
    notification pop-up. I then click on the icon, it shows me what
    patches. I have the option to deselect if I want. Then when I
    give it the go ahead, it asks me for my sudo password, downloads
    and installs.

    Commit Log for Sat Dec 1 05:35:47 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    libpoppler-glib2 (0.6-0ubuntu2.1) to 0.6.2-1~gutsy1
    libpoppler2 (0.6-0ubuntu2.1) to 0.6.2-1~gutsy1
    poppler-utils (0.6-0ubuntu2.1) to 0.6.2-1~gutsy1

    Commit Log for Tue Dec 4 04:01:07 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    apturl (0.1ubuntu1) to 0.1ubuntu2
    language-pack-en (1:7.10+20071012) to 1:7.10+20071120
    language-pack-gnome-en (1:7.10+20071012) to 1:7.10+20071120
    language-pack-kde-en (1:7.10+20071012) to 1:7.10+20071120
    ubufox (0.4~beta1-0ubuntu4) to 0.4~beta1-0ubuntu6

    Commit Log for Wed Dec 5 02:52:00 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    foo2zjs (20070625-0ubuntu1) to 20070625-0ubuntu1.1
    k3b-i18n (1.0.3-0ubuntu1) to 1.0.4-2~gutsy1
    libcairo2 (1.4.10-1ubuntu4) to 1.4.10-1ubuntu4.1
    libnm-glib0 (0.6.5-0ubuntu16) to 0.6.5-0ubuntu16.7.10.0
    libnm-util0 (0.6.5-0ubuntu16) to 0.6.5-0ubuntu16.7.10.0
    network-manager (0.6.5-0ubuntu16) to 0.6.5-0ubuntu16.7.10.0
    openoffice.org (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-base (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-calc (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-common (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-core (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-draw (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-evolution (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-filter-mobiledev (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to
    1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-gnome (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-gtk (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-impress (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-java-common (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-l10n-en-us (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-math (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-style-andromeda (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to
    1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-style-default (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-style-human (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-style-industrial (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to
    1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    openoffice.org-writer (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    python-uno (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3
    ttf-opensymbol (1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5) to 1:2.3.0-1ubuntu5.3

    Commit Log for Thu Dec 6 02:55:54 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    firefox (2.0.0.10+2nobinonly-0ubuntu1.7.10.1) to
    2.0.0.11+2nobinonly-0ubuntu0.7.10
    firefox-gnome-support (2.0.0.10+2nobinonly-0ubuntu1.7.10.1) to
    2.0.0.11+2nobinonly-0ubuntu0.7.10
    libcompress-zlib-perl (2.005-1) to 2.005-1ubuntu0.2
    libperl5.8 (5.8.8-7ubuntu3) to 5.8.8-7ubuntu3.1
    perl (5.8.8-7ubuntu3) to 5.8.8-7ubuntu3.1
    perl-base (5.8.8-7ubuntu3) to 5.8.8-7ubuntu3.1
    perl-modules (5.8.8-7ubuntu3) to 5.8.8-7ubuntu3.1
    tzdata (2007h-0ubuntu0.7.10) to 2007j-0ubuntu0.7.10

    Commit Log for Sat Dec 8 03:04:09 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    libkpathsea4 (2007-12ubuntu3) to 2007-12ubuntu3.1
    openarena (0.6.0-4) to 0.7.0-2~gutsy1
    openarena-data (0.6.0-1) to 0.7.1-1~gutsy1
    texlive-base-bin (2007-12ubuntu3) to 2007-12ubuntu3.1

    Commit Log for Sun Dec 9 02:06:34 2007

    Upgraded the following packages:
    e2fslibs (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    e2fsprogs (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    libblkid1 (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    libcomerr2 (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    libss2 (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    libuuid1 (1.40.2-1ubuntu1) to 1.40.2-1ubuntu1.1
    --
    HPT

  2. Re: Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent

    Verily I say unto thee, that High Plains Thumper spake thusly:

    > Following are the Synaptic patch management downloads from my system
    > for month of December 2007. I have the system notify me when are
    > available through an icon in the task bar and notification pop-up. I
    > then click on the icon, it shows me what patches. I have the option
    > to deselect if I want. Then when I give it the go ahead, it asks me
    > for my sudo password, downloads and installs.


    Are these full package updates, or diffs?

    Updating by binary diffs (deltarpms) is The Next Big Thing® in GNU/Linux
    package management. I haven't had a chance to play with it yet, but the
    YUM plugin and repos for Fedora are here:

    https://hosted.fedoraproject.org/projects/presto/

    This will be a Godsend for my local repo mirror, which currently eats up
    around 40GB in packages, but could be reduced to half that with deltas.
    It'll also save a lot of bandwidth, both on the LAN (which is always
    busy throwing media files around), and my ADSL sub. I'm surprised nobody
    thought of this before now.

    --
    K.
    http://slated.org

    ..----
    | "Future archaeologists will be able to identify a 'Vista Upgrade
    | Layer' when they go through our landfill sites." - Siân Berry,
    | Green Party. http://www.greenparty.org.uk/news/2851
    `----

    Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.9-91.fc7
    09:47:14 up 5:33, 2 users, load average: 0.18, 0.28, 0.39

  3. Re: Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent

    ____/ [H]omer on Tuesday 11 December 2007 09:49 : \____

    > Verily I say unto thee, that High Plains Thumper spake thusly:
    >
    >> Following are the Synaptic patch management downloads from my system
    >> for month of December 2007. I have the system notify me when are
    >> available through an icon in the task bar and notification pop-up. I
    >> then click on the icon, it shows me what patches. I have the option
    >> to deselect if I want. Then when I give it the go ahead, it asks me
    >> for my sudo password, downloads and installs.

    >
    > Are these full package updates, or diffs?
    >
    > Updating by binary diffs (deltarpms) is The Next Big Thing® in GNU/Linux
    > package management. I haven't had a chance to play with it yet, but the
    > YUM plugin and repos for Fedora are here:
    >
    > https://hosted.fedoraproject.org/projects/presto/
    >
    > This will be a Godsend for my local repo mirror, which currently eats up
    > around 40GB in packages, but could be reduced to half that with deltas.
    > It'll also save a lot of bandwidth, both on the LAN (which is always
    > busy throwing media files around), and my ADSL sub. I'm surprised nobody
    > thought of this before now.


    I remember Canonical complaining about people who planned to download an RC of
    Ubuntu and then rsync for the diffs when it's ready. That would have taken
    servers to their knees. My experience my rsync over here is that it's CPU
    murder, but a bandwidth miracle.
    #
    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | WARNING: /dev/null running out of space
    http://Schestowitz.com | GNU is Not UNIX | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    http://iuron.com - proposing a non-profit search engine

  4. Re: Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent

    Roy Schestowitz espoused:
    > ____/ [H]omer on Tuesday 11 December 2007 09:49 : \____
    >
    >> Verily I say unto thee, that High Plains Thumper spake thusly:
    >>
    >>> Following are the Synaptic patch management downloads from my system
    >>> for month of December 2007. I have the system notify me when are
    >>> available through an icon in the task bar and notification pop-up. I
    >>> then click on the icon, it shows me what patches. I have the option
    >>> to deselect if I want. Then when I give it the go ahead, it asks me
    >>> for my sudo password, downloads and installs.

    >>
    >> Are these full package updates, or diffs?
    >>
    >> Updating by binary diffs (deltarpms) is The Next Big Thing in GNU/Linux
    >> package management. I haven't had a chance to play with it yet, but the
    >> YUM plugin and repos for Fedora are here:
    >>
    >> https://hosted.fedoraproject.org/projects/presto/
    >>
    >> This will be a Godsend for my local repo mirror, which currently eats up
    >> around 40GB in packages, but could be reduced to half that with deltas.
    >> It'll also save a lot of bandwidth, both on the LAN (which is always
    >> busy throwing media files around), and my ADSL sub. I'm surprised nobody
    >> thought of this before now.

    >
    > I remember Canonical complaining about people who planned to download an RC of
    > Ubuntu and then rsync for the diffs when it's ready. That would have taken
    > servers to their knees. My experience my rsync over here is that it's CPU
    > murder, but a bandwidth miracle.
    > #


    It's brilliant, so long as the complete binaries and source are also
    available in case of problems or rebuild or something. There's
    something somewhat ironic about how bandwidth requirements are falling
    all the time as actual available bandwidth is rising. I note that
    apt-get typically downloads diffs to package listings rather than full
    listings now. Not a huge different, but it's all gain.

    --
    | Mark Kent -- mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | My (new) blog: http://www.thereisnomagic.org |

  5. Re: Ubuntu Gutsy Patch Management Excellent

    On 2007-12-11, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    > I remember Canonical complaining about people who planned to download an RC of
    > Ubuntu and then rsync for the diffs when it's ready. That would have taken
    > servers to their knees. My experience my rsync over here is that it's CPU
    > murder, but a bandwidth miracle.


    Has anyone asked the rsync developers if they can address this? Here's
    basically how rsync works:

    1. The receiver splits the file it has into non-overlapping fixed size
    chunks. For each chunk, it computes two checksums:

    A. A strong checksum (I believe it uses MD4).

    B. A weaker checksum (only 32 bits, I think), but using an algorithm
    that has this important property:

    If you are given the checksum, C0, of a sequence of bytes

    B0 B1 B2 ... Bn-1

    you can compute the checksum, C1, of the sequence of bytes

    B1 B2 B3 ... Bn

    using only B0, Bn, and C0.

    2. The receiver sends the checksums to the sender.

    3. The sender computes the weak checksum for every n byte chunk of the
    file. The special property of the weak checksum given above allows it
    to do this efficiently, by computing it for the chunk starting at offset
    0, and then it can just roll through the file, adjusting for each
    offset.

    4. The sender looks for matches in those checksums in the list from the
    receiver. Where it finds matches, it computes the strong checksum to see
    if they are real (because the weak checksum is weak, there will be many
    matches that aren't real, hence the need for a strong checksum).

    5. From this, the sender can figure out how to change the receiver's
    current file into the sender's file.

    It seems to me that this could work just as well with the sender doing
    the non-overlapped checksums, and the receiver doing the rolling
    checksum, the matching, the verification by strong checksum, and the
    determination of what data to ask for. That would put most of the CPU
    work on the receiver side.

    Presumably, there is an advantage to the way it is done now, but I bet
    they could add an option to rsync to do it the other way, for use in
    using rsync for large software distributions.

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