Re: Red Hat password - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: Red Hat password - Linux ; news.rcn.com wrote: > Just inherited an old computer someone had thrown away with Red Hat > installed on its hard drive which I thought I would try > > The installation has a password on it. Is there anyway I ...

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Thread: Re: Red Hat password

  1. Re: Red Hat password

    news.rcn.com wrote:

    > Just inherited an old computer someone had thrown away with Red Hat
    > installed on its hard drive which I thought I would try
    >
    > The installation has a password on it. Is there anyway I can start the newer
    > computer into which I am putting this drive, start from Knoppix and get rid
    > of the password so that I can see how Red Hat works and if I like it? Is the
    > password contained in some file or other or should I just delete the whole
    > installation and install some other distro or the Windows 98 installation
    > which came with the newer computer complete with all its drivers?


    Whereabouts does the passwod request come on the installation?

    Is it a bios password which must be entered before the computer will boot,
    or does the system get the Linux up and running and you have no login details?

    If the latter, does the boot loader allow you to input an option? Do you
    know what boot loader it is using?



  2. Re: Red Hat password


    > Whereabouts does the passwod request come on the installation?

    It is not a bios password: The computer will boot, the system gets the
    Linux up and running and I have no login details?


    > If the latter, does the boot loader allow you to input an option? Do you
    > know what boot loader it is using?


    No but when I try to boot from a floppy, and default to the linux
    installation that way, it does ask me to give it some boot loader and I
    havent the vaguest idea what to answer



  3. Re: Red Hat password

    news.rcn.com wrote:
    > Robert Newson wrote:
    >>Whereabouts does the passwod request come on the installation?

    >
    > It is not a bios password: The computer will boot, the system gets the
    > Linux up and running and I have no login details?


    You wrote:

    > The installation has a password on it.


    This, however, is meaningless on a Linux system.

    Whereupon he asked:

    Do you lack login details for this system, i.e. it wants a username and
    password but you don't have any ?

    That's what you're supposed to respond to.

    > No but when I try to boot from a floppy, and default to the linux
    > installation that way, it does ask me to give it some boot loader and I
    > havent the vaguest idea what to answer


    Nor do I , since I have no clue what you are saying...


    --
    J

    www.gentoo.org - not just for geeks anymore.

  4. Re: Red Hat password

    Sorry about that Jeroen, I hadnt repeated everything in the thread



  5. Re: Red Hat password

    I think this problem has 'solved' itself: The computer starts to read its
    raid arrays and identifies its processor and then overreads its hard drive
    (whatever that means) and invariably gives the error message Kernel Panic
    VFS Unable to mount HDD.

    This seems to be on a page of text after the Red Hat splash screen. Nothing
    I can do will reveal the boot loader or get as far as the enter userID now.

    Seems I will have to dump this installation and start afresh? Or is there
    some way of debugging this installation?



  6. Re: Red Hat password

    "news.rcn.com" wrote in
    news:su6dnT6SgokpaDnfRVn-sg@rcn.net:

    > I think this problem has 'solved' itself: The computer starts to read
    > its raid arrays and identifies its processor and then overreads its
    > hard drive (whatever that means) and invariably gives the error
    > message Kernel Panic VFS Unable to mount HDD.
    >
    > This seems to be on a page of text after the Red Hat splash screen.
    > Nothing I can do will reveal the boot loader or get as far as the
    > enter userID now.
    >
    > Seems I will have to dump this installation and start afresh? Or is
    > there some way of debugging this installation?


    This just means that the kernel cannot mount the hard drive. Probably is in
    a different IDE location than the computer from which it came. Hard drives
    in linux are listed as:

    IDE0
    primary hdda
    secondary hddb

    IDE1
    primary hddc
    secondary hddd

    You could boot to knoppix, then edit the lilo or grub conf file to fix that
    error and specify where the hard drive is now. Of course you still need the
    root password to run the system and administer it. That means booting to
    knoppix again and then mounting the hard drive, chrooting it, then using
    the passwd command to clear or change the root password (Or remove it from
    the shadow file.), unmounting the drive, then booting to the actual drive
    this time. google has much to offer on this.

    --
    ~Ohmster
    "Read Ohmster" in subject, bypass spam filter.
    ohmster /a/t/ newsguy dot com

  7. Re: Red Hat password

    Many thanks for taking the time to respond on this: Firstly, when I put the
    drive in the new computer, (wich is a laptop which should have the HDD in
    the same place as the old system which was also a laptop) the system did
    boot to a Red Hat password request page, indicating that it had found a HDD?

    In any event, this all sounds like a major headache (not sure I even know
    how to edit a lilo file in linux??) just to try out Red Hat. I was hoping I
    could just delete some passwd file adn be asked for a new one on next boot
    or something. I think I will just install some flavour of Windows to make
    life easier or possibly do a hard install of Knoppix on the drive from the
    run CD. I suspect there may be better distros but Knoppix makes life SO
    easy with all its self-configuration

    On one install (running standard from the CD) it even got a Netgear WiFi
    card to work automatically! Which is (with this card) somehting I have never
    managed to get to work (on Windows) since, even with Netgear's technican
    support people desperately trying to assist. I was wondering if Red Hat was
    so user friendly but suppose I will not find out at this stage.


    > This just means that the kernel cannot mount the hard drive. Probably is
    > in
    > a different IDE location than the computer from which it came. Hard drives
    > in linux are listed as:
    >
    > IDE0
    > primary hdda
    > secondary hddb
    >
    > IDE1
    > primary hddc
    > secondary hddd
    >
    > You could boot to knoppix, then edit the lilo or grub conf file to fix
    > that
    > error and specify where the hard drive is now. Of course you still need
    > the
    > root password to run the system and administer it. That means booting to
    > knoppix again and then mounting the hard drive, chrooting it, then using
    > the passwd command to clear or change the root password (Or remove it from
    > the shadow file.), unmounting the drive, then booting to the actual drive
    > this time. google has much to offer on this.
    >
    > --
    > ~Ohmster
    > "Read Ohmster" in subject, bypass spam filter.
    > ohmster /a/t/ newsguy dot com




  8. Re: Red Hat password

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 02:53:13 +0000, Ohmster wrote:

    > "news.rcn.com" wrote in
    > news:su6dnT6SgokpaDnfRVn-sg@rcn.net:
    > This just means that the kernel cannot mount the hard drive. Probably is in
    > a different IDE location than the computer from which it came. Hard drives
    > in linux are listed as:
    >
    > IDE0
    > primary hdda
    > secondary hddb

    I think you mean:
    hda
    hdb

    >
    > IDE1
    > primary hddc
    > secondary hddd

    and:
    hdc
    hdd

    Anyway, if you get as far as to the password problem again:
    boot with knoppix, chroot into the redhat installation.
    and try 'passwd' that should work, passwords and groups are stored
    in files inside /etc, depending on what mechanism you use to
    protect the password they may be in:
    /etc/passwd(-)
    /etc/shadow(-), the password is probably stored here if the distro
    isn't too old.

    and groups:
    /etc/group(-)

    Gaute (The Great) Hope
    --
    For evig! For alltid!


  9. Re: Red Hat password

    Gaute Hope wrote in
    newsan.2005.06.07.17.45.33.985758@gaute.vetsj.com:

    > I think you mean:
    > hda
    > hdb


    Yeah that's what I mean, thanks.

    Gaute is right, mount your redhat partition with knoppix and chroot it,
    then use the passwd command to reset your password.

    Note: Redhat is seriously out of date. This would be a good learning
    experience for you but it would be wise to just download a new distribution
    that comes with updates like Fedora.

    --
    ~Ohmster
    "Read Ohmster" in subject, bypass spam filter.
    ohmster /a/t/ newsguy dot com

  10. Re: Red Hat learning experience

    Many thanks for your additional input guys: As an occasional Knoppix user, I
    am not sure I need this particular learning experience?

    There is, it would seem, absolutely no reason to try to get into this
    installation working. It came off a 233 MHz PC and is probably a MUCH older
    than even the current version of Red Hat. Shouldn't I just download some
    other distro onto a CD and try to get it to format the drive and install it?
    I know I can do this with Knoppix AND end up with all the necessary software
    as well. Shouldnt I just try to install Knoppix onto my hard drive? It is a
    366 Celeron with 64 MEG of memory

    > Note: Redhat is seriously out of date. This would be a good learning
    > experience for you




  11. Re: Red Hat learning experience

    "news.rcn.com" wrote in
    news:LpydnV_2WodYjjrfRVn-rw@rcn.net:

    > Many thanks for your additional input guys: As an occasional Knoppix
    > user, I am not sure I need this particular learning experience?
    >
    > There is, it would seem, absolutely no reason to try to get into this
    > installation working. It came off a 233 MHz PC and is probably a MUCH
    > older than even the current version of Red Hat. Shouldn't I just
    > download some other distro onto a CD and try to get it to format the
    > drive and install it? I know I can do this with Knoppix AND end up
    > with all the necessary software as well. Shouldnt I just try to
    > install Knoppix onto my hard drive? It is a 366 Celeron with 64 MEG
    > of memory
    >
    >> Note: Redhat is seriously out of date. This would be a good learning
    >> experience for you


    Yeah knoppix is okay but you will have a much easier go of it if you just
    download a modern distribution and install it. Usually "it just works" and
    you don't have to kill yourself making it install. What to use with a low
    powered machine like that? Phew, that is not much memory to work with but
    any modern distro would work if you go easy on the xwindow stuff and use a
    light window manager like, oh I don't know, somebody will come in here with
    tons of suggestions, no doubt, but gnome and KDE, as nice as they are, take
    up a lot of memory and will be really slow on a machine like that. Here,
    tons of stuff to see here:

    http://tinyurl.com/8kdrw

    I use Fedora Core 3 and like it, what you use is your preference. They all
    run good on a low power machine if you don't run all of the fancy, high
    powered xwindows stuff. The servers will rock, everything else will rock,
    and you pick a light window manager and you can use the xwindows.

    --
    ~Ohmster
    "Read Ohmster" in subject, bypass spam filter.
    ohmster /a/t/ newsguy dot com

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