Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year - Linux

This is a discussion on Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year - Linux ; "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday." http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...3-6220719.html ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

  1. Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year


    "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."

    http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...3-6220719.html
    http://tinyurl.com/2b6psd

    -RFH


  2. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    > "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    > found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    > company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    > rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >
    > http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >
    > -RFH




    "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."

    -Ramon


  3. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:

    > On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>
    >> http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>
    >> -RFH

    >
    > "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."


    What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities are in
    older versions of the software. The most recent versions (Vista, Office
    2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.

  4. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >
    >> On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >>> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >>> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >>> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>>
    >>>

    http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>>
    >>> -RFH

    >>
    >> "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."

    >
    > What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities are
    > in
    > older versions of the software. The most recent versions (Vista, Office
    > 2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.


    Do you actually think anybody is dumb enough to take *your* word for this,
    Erik?
    I'd rather believe DumbFull****.
    --
    If you had any brains, you'd be dangerous.


  5. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 11:03:34 -0600, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >
    >> On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >>> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >>> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >>> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>>
    >>> http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>>
    >>> -RFH

    >>
    >> "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."

    >
    > What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities
    > are in older versions of the software. The most recent versions
    > (Vista, Office 2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.


    Well duh? Couldn't be because 'Vista, Office 2007, etc..' have a very
    small user base at the moment? Afterall, isn't that the excuse you
    trolls give to the next to zero number of viruses / trojans against
    Linux?

    Give it time Erik. As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    etc..' I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    they still are when it comes to SW security.

  6. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    * Ramon F Herrera fired off this tart reply:

    > "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    > found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    > company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    > rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >
    > http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...3-6220719.html
    > http://tinyurl.com/2b6psd


    Refactoring is a bitch.

    Even with their new software "processes".

    Alan Paller, director of research for the Sans Institute, a
    computer-security training organization, said that the reason more
    vulnerabilities were being found was that it was becoming increasingly
    profitable for crooks to target the software.

    "It isn't that Microsoft isn't doing a better job," Paller said. "The
    reason (is that) it is so lucrative to find vulnerabilities in Excel and
    Word, so there are a lot of (hackers) searching for them."

    Microsoft declined to comment for this story.

    What, alluvasudden it is more lucrative to crack MS software? Huh?

    --
    Tux rox!

  7. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 18:12:11 +0100, Peter Khlmann wrote:

    > Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>>> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >>>> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >>>> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >>>> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>>>
    >>>>

    > http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>>>
    >>>> -RFH
    >>>
    >>> "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."

    >>
    >> What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities are
    >> in
    >> older versions of the software. The most recent versions (Vista, Office
    >> 2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.

    >
    > Do you actually think anybody is dumb enough to take *your* word for this,
    > Erik?
    > I'd rather believe DumbFull****.


    Look at the article in question, it hyperlinks to a flaw in office that..
    guess what? doesn't affect Office 2007.

  8. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 17:17:41 +0000 (UTC), p5000011 wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 11:03:34 -0600, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>>> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >>>> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >>>> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >>>> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>>>
    >>>> -RFH
    >>>
    >>> "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."

    >>
    >> What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities
    >> are in older versions of the software. The most recent versions
    >> (Vista, Office 2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.

    >
    > Well duh? Couldn't be because 'Vista, Office 2007, etc..' have a very
    > small user base at the moment? Afterall, isn't that the excuse you
    > trolls give to the next to zero number of viruses / trojans against
    > Linux?


    That makes no sense. The flaws generally affect 2000 and XP, but not
    vista. They affect Office 2000, xp, and 2003 but not Office 2007. The
    point being, Microsoft has improved the code in all it's new products a
    great deal to the point that flaws that affect all the older versions
    generally do not affect the latest ones.

    > Give it time Erik. As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    > HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    > etc..' I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    > they still are when it comes to SW security.


    That still makes no sense. How many people use a Vista or Office 2007 has
    no affect on whether they are vulnerable to the same flaws as older
    versions.

  9. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 18:12:11 +0100, Peter Köhlmann wrote:
    >
    >> Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 06:45:35 -0800 (PST), Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Dec 1, 10:15 am, Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>>>> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >>>>> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >>>>> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >>>>> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>>>>
    >>>>>

    >>

    http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...url.com/2b6psd
    >>>>>
    >>>>> -RFH
    >>>>
    >>>> "Microsoft declined to comment for this story."
    >>>
    >>> What this doesn't say is that virtually all of those vulnerabilities are
    >>> in
    >>> older versions of the software. The most recent versions (Vista, Office
    >>> 2007, etc..) are most times not susceptible to them.

    >>
    >> Do you actually think anybody is dumb enough to take *your* word for
    >> this, Erik?
    >> I'd rather believe DumbFull****.

    >
    > Look at the article in question, it hyperlinks to a flaw in office that..
    > guess what? doesn't affect Office 2007.


    You talk about *one* *specific* flaw now, Erik

    Your claim was "The most recent versions (Vista, Office 2007, etc..) are
    most times not susceptible to them". Unspecified software, unspecified
    vulnerabilities. Lots of hand waving

    Which is about as trustworthy as a flatfish claim

    Face it, Erik: Your credibility is at about zero. No matter what you claim,
    I will assume that you are lying. As will most others in this group
    --
    Just out of curiosity does this actually mean something or have some
    of the few remaining bits of your brain just evaporated?


  10. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    p5000011 wrote:

    > As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    > HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    > etc..'


    More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office 2007 run
    fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.


    > I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    > they still are when it comes to SW security.


    Rather inept at only security than inept at EVERYTHING but security.



  11. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 1 Dec 2007 11:28:29 -0600, Erik Funkenbusch
    wrote:


    >Look at the article in question, it hyperlinks to a flaw in office that..
    >guess what? doesn't affect Office 2007.


    Linux users don't know what hyper links are, especially when it comes
    to help systems.

  12. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    DFS wrote:
    > p5000011 wrote:
    >
    >> As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    >> HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    >> etc..'

    >
    > More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office 2007 run


    the word you are looking for is "crawl", or possibly "crash" or "BSoD",
    not "run"

    > fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.


    Linux (Compiz Fusion) and Open Office will fly (not merely run) on
    hardware considerably older.


    >> I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    >> they still are when it comes to SW security.

    >
    > Rather inept at only security than inept at EVERYTHING but security.


    M$ is inept at writing software and good at writing FUD and checks (for
    bribes).


    --

    Random Flatfish Nym:
    Rich

  13. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Ben Miller-Jacobson writes:

    > DFS wrote:
    >> p5000011 wrote:
    >>
    >>> As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    >>> HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    >>> etc..'

    >>
    >> More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office
    >> 2007 run

    >
    > the word you are looking for is "crawl", or possibly "crash" or
    > "BSoD", not "run"
    >
    >> fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.

    >
    > Linux (Compiz Fusion) and Open Office will fly (not merely run) on
    > hardware considerably older.


    Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.

    >
    >
    >>> I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    >>> they still are when it comes to SW security.

    >>
    >> Rather inept at only security than inept at EVERYTHING but
    >> security.

    >
    > M$ is inept at writing software and good at writing FUD and checks
    > (for bribes).


    Crikey, you really are a loony-tunes. But while you are accusing MS of
    writing cheques to bribe people, why don't you prove it? Maybe you could
    tell their lawyers your sources for such scurrilous allegations?

  14. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 22:40:50 +0100, Hadron
    wrote:


    >Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    >are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.


    The Windows version is definitely worse than the Linux versions I have
    used.
    I installed OO on my Windows XP Thinkpad and the machine literally
    ground to a halt.
    I don't know why, but I removed it after a couple of days and the
    machine returned to normal.

    Under Linux it's not bad considering the cost and for most people it
    really is fine.
    The problem is that Office or Works comes with the majority of
    pre-loaded machines so the average person already has a word
    processor.

    Add to that the fact that students can buy Office for a song, and they
    do, OO has a tough battle to wage.

  15. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 17:12:03 -0500, flatfish wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 22:40:50 +0100, Hadron
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    >>are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.

    >
    > The Windows version is definitely worse than the Linux versions I have
    > used.
    > I installed OO on my Windows XP Thinkpad and the machine literally
    > ground to a halt.
    > I don't know why, but I removed it after a couple of days and the
    > machine returned to normal.
    >
    > Under Linux it's not bad considering the cost and for most people it
    > really is fine.
    > The problem is that Office or Works comes with the majority of
    > pre-loaded machines so the average person already has a word processor.


    From what I have heard, the version of Office that comes pre-loaded is
    many times merely a trial version that locks up your documents when it
    expires.

    >
    > Add to that the fact that students can buy Office for a song, and they
    > do, OO has a tough battle to wage.


    Define "buy Office for a song".



    --
    Rick

  16. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Hadron wrote:

    > Ben Miller-Jacobson writes:
    >
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>> p5000011 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    >>>> HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    >>>> etc..'
    >>>
    >>> More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office
    >>> 2007 run

    >>
    >> the word you are looking for is "crawl", or possibly "crash" or
    >> "BSoD", not "run"
    >>
    >>> fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.

    >>
    >> Linux (Compiz Fusion) and Open Office will fly (not merely run) on
    >> hardware considerably older.

    >
    > Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    > are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.
    >


    Well, "snappier" remains a very personal opinion then.
    Startup times of 8 seconds for OO compared to 6 seconds for MS Office
    certainly don't indicate any sluggish behaviour. Especially as in using OO
    there seems to be no speed penalty at all.
    And that "stability" thingy is where MS Office could learn a trick or two,
    where OO opened Word-docs without a hickup and MS Word tended to crash

    --
    Windows: Because everyone needs a good laugh!


  17. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Hadron wrote:
    > Ben Miller-Jacobson writes:
    >
    >> DFS wrote:
    >>> p5000011 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    >>>> HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    >>>> etc..'
    >>> More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office
    >>> 2007 run

    >> the word you are looking for is "crawl", or possibly "crash" or
    >> "BSoD", not "run"
    >>
    >>> fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.

    >> Linux (Compiz Fusion) and Open Office will fly (not merely run) on
    >> hardware considerably older.

    >
    > Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    > are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.


    On my mom's XP box (1 gb ram, P4 @ 3.2 ghz), Office takes over two
    minutes to start and crashes when you try to insert clipart. In OO, it
    is much faster and doesn't crash as much.

    Not everyone will have this sort of experience, off course.

    >>
    >>>> I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    >>>> they still are when it comes to SW security.
    >>> Rather inept at only security than inept at EVERYTHING but
    >>> security.

    >> M$ is inept at writing software and good at writing FUD and checks
    >> (for bribes).

    >
    > Crikey, you really are a loony-tunes. But while you are accusing MS of
    > writing cheques to bribe people, why don't you prove it? Maybe you could
    > tell their lawyers your sources for such scurrilous allegations?


    That a bit of hyperbole, sorry. As far as I know, they do not, literally
    write checks to bribe people, though it wouldn't surprise me. They are
    known to bribe people with marketing help and threaten them with
    drastically increased prices, however, and it sure looks like they might
    have parts of the U.S. government under their thumbs.

    --

    Random Flatfish Nym:
    Bab**** Johnson

  18. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    Ben Miller-Jacobson writes:

    > Hadron wrote:
    >> Ben Miller-Jacobson writes:
    >>
    >>> DFS wrote:
    >>>> p5000011 wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> As more people are 'coerced' into upgrading their
    >>>>> HW to support the excessive requirements of 'Vista, Office 2007,
    >>>>> etc..'
    >>>> More idiocy and lies from the cola cabal. Vista (Aero) and Office
    >>>> 2007 run
    >>> the word you are looking for is "crawl", or possibly "crash" or
    >>> "BSoD", not "run"
    >>>
    >>>> fine on old P4, 2.0ghz systems w/ 1gb RAM and a cheap video card.
    >>> Linux (Compiz Fusion) and Open Office will fly (not merely run) on
    >>> hardware considerably older.

    >>
    >> Garbage. Open Office is a complete dog where performance and stability
    >> are concerned. MS Office is far snappier.

    >
    > On my mom's XP box (1 gb ram, P4 @ 3.2 ghz), Office takes over two
    > minutes to start and crashes when you try to insert clipart. In OO, it
    > is much faster and doesn't crash as much.


    Certainly quite unique. OO is very, very slow. I never bothered looking
    into why but I suspect heavy reliance on Java.

    >
    > Not everyone will have this sort of experience, off course.
    >
    >>>
    >>>>> I'm sure Microsoft won't let us down and will show us how inept
    >>>>> they still are when it comes to SW security.
    >>>> Rather inept at only security than inept at EVERYTHING but
    >>>> security.
    >>> M$ is inept at writing software and good at writing FUD and checks
    >>> (for bribes).

    >>
    >> Crikey, you really are a loony-tunes. But while you are accusing MS of
    >> writing cheques to bribe people, why don't you prove it? Maybe you could
    >> tell their lawyers your sources for such scurrilous allegations?

    >
    > That a bit of hyperbole, sorry. As far as I know, they do not,
    > literally write checks to bribe people, though it wouldn't surprise
    > me. They are known to bribe people with marketing help and threaten


    The bottom line is you say "bribe". Others would say customer relation
    management.

    > them with drastically increased prices, however, and it sure looks
    > like they might have parts of the U.S. government under their thumbs.


    --
    Aunque sea justificada, la felicidad es un privilegio.
    -- Edmundo Thiandiére.

  19. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    ____/ Linonut on Saturday 01 December 2007 17:19 : \____

    > * Ramon F Herrera fired off this tart reply:
    >
    >> "The past year has seen a massive increase in the number of flaws
    >> found in Microsoft software, according to vulnerability-scanning
    >> company Qualys. Between 2006 and 2007, there was an almost threefold
    >> rise in Microsoft flaws, Qualys said on Wednesday."
    >>
    >>

    http://www.news.com/Study-Huge-jump-...3-6220719.html
    >> http://tinyurl.com/2b6psd

    >
    > Refactoring is a bitch.
    >
    > Even with their new software "processes".
    >
    > Alan Paller, director of research for the Sans Institute, a
    > computer-security training organization, said that the reason more
    > vulnerabilities were being found was that it was becoming increasingly
    > profitable for crooks to target the software.
    >
    > "It isn't that Microsoft isn't doing a better job," Paller said. "The
    > reason (is that) it is so lucrative to find vulnerabilities in Excel and
    > Word, so there are a lot of (hackers) searching for them."
    >
    > Microsoft declined to comment for this story.
    >
    > What, alluvasudden it is more lucrative to crack MS software? Huh?


    For all I can tell and gather, some vulnerabilities in Microsoft's software in
    in general are there _by design_. The government need points of access (I kid
    you not, but why ask me? Ask security Gurus).


    Duh! Windows Encryption Hacked Via Random Number Generator

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | GeneralMount Carmel, Haifa – A group of researchers headed by Dr. Benny
    | Pinkas from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Haifa
    | succeeded in finding a security vulnerability in Microsoft's "Windows 2000"
    | operating system. The significance of the loophole: emails, passwords, credit
    | card numbers, if they were typed into the computer, and actually all
    | correspondence that emanated from a computer using "Windows 2000" is
    | susceptible to tracking. "This is not a theoretical discovery. Anyone who
    | exploits this security loophole can definitely access this information on
    | other computers," remarked Dr. Pinkas.
    |
    | Editors Note: I believe this "loophole" is part of the Patriot Act, it is
    | designed for foreign governments. Seriously, if you care about security,
    | privacy, data, trojans, spyware, etc., one does not run Windows, you run
    | Linux.
    `----

    http://www.linuxelectrons.com/news/g...mber-generator


    Chip Design Flaw Could Subvert Encryption

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Shamir said that if an intelligence organization discovered such a flaw,
    | security software on a computer with a compromised chip could be "trivially
    | broken with a single chosen message." The attacker would send a "poisoned"
    | encrypted message to a protected computer, he wrote. It would then be
    | possible to compute the value of the secret key used by the targeted system. * *
    |
    | Trouble with Design Secrets
    |
    | "Millions of PCs can be attacked simultaneously, without having to manipulate
    | the operating environment of each one of them individually," Shamir wrote. *
    `----

    http://www.crm-daily.com/story.xhtml...d=11200BH5USIO


    "Trusted" Computing

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Do you imagine that any US Linux distributor would say no to the
    | US government if they were requested (politely, of course) to add
    | a back-door to the binary Linux images shipped as part of their
    | products ? Who amongst us actually uses the source code so helpfully
    | given to us on the extra CDs to compile our own version ? With
    | Windows of course there are already so many back-doors known and
    | unknown that the US government might not have even bothered to
    | ask Microsoft, they may have just found their own, ready to
    | exploit at will. What about Intel or AMD and the microcode on
    | the processor itself ?
    `----

    http://tuxdeluxe.org/node/164


    Who do You Trust with Your Computing?

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Helios was speaking out against trusted computing (TC) and Digital
    | Rights Management (DRM) that is humming softly at the hardware and
    | software level inside YOUR computer right now. That's right! Chances
    | are, it's already made it on a chip on your and my motherboards...but
    | it's there. Soon, if what can happen does happen...we'll all be so
    | very unhappy at being told how we can and can't operate our PCs.
    |
    | Some of you may be asking, "what the heck are you talking about?
    | They can't tell me how I can use my computer inside my own home".
    | Unfortunately, that statement is false. DRM chips are already on a
    | majority of motherboards and even built into some processors (viiv
    | anyone?). All it takes is a flip of the switch and you'll do what
    | Microsoft or any other company that wants to manage your rights
    | for you tells you to do whether you like it or not. That is, ofc
    | ourse, unless you use Linux *Linux has always been about
    | choice...we choose to compute in ways WE want to...not ways
    | that are defined for us.
    `----

    http://linux-blog.org/index.php?/arc...Computing.html


    Microsoft exec calls XP hack 'frightening'

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "You can download attack tools from the Internet, and even script kiddies can
    | use this one," said Mick.
    |
    | Mick found the IP address of his own computer by using the XP Wireless
    | Network Connection Status dialog box. He deduced the IP address of Andy's
    | computer by typing different numerically adjacent addresses in that IP range
    | into the attack tool, then scanning the addresses to see if they belonged to
    | a vulnerable machine. * *
    |
    | Using a different attack tool, he produced a security report detailing the
    | vulnerabilities found on the system. Mick decided to exploit one of them.
    | Using the attack tool, Mick built a piece of malware in MS-DOS, giving it a
    | payload that would exploit the flaw within a couple of minutes. *
    `----

    http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-6218238.html


    Why proprietary code is bad for security

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Tho Skype is using an encrypted protocol, it’s still their own, non-disclosed
    | code and property. So we don’t know what it contains.
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | It’s time to stop accepting that we are the bad guys, and to stop consuming
    | things we just don’t understand (and cannot, because they are proprietary, *
    | closed-source systems).
    |
    | Say no to companies, or even governments who treat you like this. Start using
    | open sourced products and protocols wherever you can. Even if you could
    | still never understand the code used in these systems, there are still lots
    | of people who can, and who will examine it. The magic word here is “peer
    | review” - your friend or buddy or neighbour may be able to understand all
    | that, and to help. No, not with Skype or Windows or any black box from Cisco. * * *
    `----

    http://wolfgang.lonien.de/?p=394


    Did NSA Put a Secret Backdoor in New Encryption Standard?

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Which is why you should worry about a new random-number standard that
    | includes an algorithm that is slow, badly designed and just might contain a
    | backdoor for the National Security Agency. *
    `----

    http://www.wired.com/politics/securi...tymatters_1115


    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "Is this a good idea or not? For the first time, the giant software maker
    | is acknowledging the help of the secretive agency, better known for
    | eavesdropping on foreign officials and, more recently, U.S. citizens as
    | part of the Bush..."
    `----

    http://www.schneier.com/blog/archive...s_micro_1.html


    Microsoft could be teaching police to hack Vista

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Microsoft may begin training the police in ways to break the
    | encryption built into its forthcoming Vista operating system.
    `----

    http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/21...ng-police-hack


    UK holds Microsoft security talks

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "UK officials are talking to Microsoft over fears the new version of
    | Windows could make it harder for police to read suspects' computer files."
    `----

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4713018.stm


    Austria OKs terror snooping Trojan plan

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | Austria has become one of the first countries to officially sanction the use
    | of Trojan Horse malware as a tactic for monitoring the PCs of suspected
    | terrorists and criminals. *
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | Would-be terrorists need only use Ubuntu Linux to avoid the ploy. And even if
    | they stuck with Windows their anti-virus software might detect the malware.
    | Anti-virus firms that accede to law enforcement demands to turn a blind eye
    | to state-sanctioned malware risk undermining trust in their software, as
    | similar experience in the US has shown. * *
    `----

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/10...utonic_trojan/

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Windows all-in-one: Word, IE (for E-mail) & iTunes
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    run-level 2 2007-10-30 19:49 last=
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine

  20. Re: Study: 'Huge jump' in Microsoft flaws since last year

    On Sat, 01 Dec 2007 22:21:43 -0000, Rick wrote:


    >From what I have heard, the version of Office that comes pre-loaded is
    >many times merely a trial version that locks up your documents when it
    >expires.



    I've never heard that one, but the student version is not upgradeable.
    That I know.
    >>
    >> Add to that the fact that students can buy Office for a song, and they
    >> do, OO has a tough battle to wage.

    >
    >Define "buy Office for a song".


    Cheap!
    (song....=song and a dance=cheap)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast