OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough - Linux

This is a discussion on OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough - Linux ; OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough http://www.greghinzmann.com/ [quote] The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support. But OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. ...

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Thread: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

  1. OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    http://www.greghinzmann.com/

    [quote]

    The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support. But
    OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The laptops
    are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting the
    $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations. That
    standard, of course, is Windows.

    The best designers act as advocates for the end user, working hard to create
    a simple, elegant, and enjoyable experience for them. That works well when
    the users and customers are one and the same. However, very often there are
    intermediary customers that must also be considered. Maybe that's a little
    more marketing strategy than designers want to be accountable for, but
    ignoring the needs of the customer and solely focusing on the needs of the
    user can be a losing strategy. Designers need to keep that in mind just as
    much as marketers do.


    [-quote]





    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  2. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:20:47 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:

    > OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough
    >
    > http://www.greghinzmann.com/
    >
    > [quote]
    >
    > The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    > learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support. But
    > OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The laptops
    > are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    > customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting the
    > $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    > extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    > aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    > upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    > track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    > connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations. That
    > standard, of course, is Windows.


    Do we really want to expose these kids to the 'delights' of viruses, DRM,
    activation, snooping, and all the bull**** that comes with Windows? I
    think not.

    --
    Kier

  3. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough


    "Kier" wrote in message
    newsan.2007.11.30.22.30.03.751718@tiscali.co.uk...
    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:20:47 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:
    >
    >> OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough
    >>
    >> http://www.greghinzmann.com/
    >>
    >> [quote]
    >>
    >> The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    >> learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support.
    >> But
    >> OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The
    >> laptops
    >> are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    >> customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting
    >> the
    >> $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    >> extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    >> aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    >> upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    >> track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    >> connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations.
    >> That
    >> standard, of course, is Windows.

    >



    > Do we really want to expose these kids to the 'delights' of viruses,

    This is nothing compared to the real diseases and viruses (viri) they face
    in every day life. None of my computers have ever gotten a virus. Why is
    that?

    > DRM

    Linux also has DRM. Take a look at the Amazon Kindle for example.

    > activation

    I'm sure Microsoft could remove activation in about 1 day if they wanted
    too.

    > snooping

    Snooping? By the CIA and NSA of course. Take of the tinfoil helmet and don't
    believe all the lies that Schestowitz posts.

    > and all the bull**** that comes with Windows?

    Most of the problems are attributed to users who know absolutely nothing
    about computers. Put linux in the hands of these same 'computer morons' and
    you'll get similar results. For exampe... phishing scams are not OS
    specific.


    > I think not.

    Therefore you are not.






    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:37:32 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:

    >
    > "Kier" wrote in message
    > newsan.2007.11.30.22.30.03.751718@tiscali.co.uk...
    >> On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:20:47 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:
    >>
    >>> OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough
    >>>
    >>> http://www.greghinzmann.com/
    >>>
    >>> [quote]
    >>>
    >>> The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    >>> learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support.
    >>> But
    >>> OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The
    >>> laptops
    >>> are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    >>> customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting
    >>> the
    >>> $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    >>> extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    >>> aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    >>> upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    >>> track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    >>> connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations.
    >>> That
    >>> standard, of course, is Windows.

    >>

    >
    >
    >> Do we really want to expose these kids to the 'delights' of viruses,

    > This is nothing compared to the real diseases and viruses (viri) they face
    > in every day life. None of my computers have ever gotten a virus. Why is
    > that?


    Luck, probably.

    >
    >> DRM

    > Linux also has DRM. Take a look at the Amazon Kindle for example.


    What has that to do with a laptop OS? Nothing.

    >
    >> activation

    > I'm sure Microsoft could remove activation in about 1 day if they wanted
    > too.


    But they don't, that's the point.

    >
    >> snooping

    > Snooping? By the CIA and NSA of course. Take of the tinfoil helmet and don't
    > believe all the lies that Schestowitz posts.


    Don't assume things about me.

    >
    >> and all the bull**** that comes with Windows?

    > Most of the problems are attributed to users who know absolutely nothing
    > about computers. Put linux in the hands of these same 'computer morons' and
    > you'll get similar results. For exampe... phishing scams are not OS
    > specific.


    There are far more problemns that come with Windows than email scams.

    >
    >
    >> I think not.

    > Therefore you are not.


    I'm certainly not a fool.

    --
    Kier


  5. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Kier

    wrote
    on Fri, 30 Nov 2007 22:52:28 +0000
    :
    > On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:37:32 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Kier" wrote in message
    >> newsan.2007.11.30.22.30.03.751718@tiscali.co.uk...
    >>> On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:20:47 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.greghinzmann.com/
    >>>>
    >>>> [quote]
    >>>>
    >>>> The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    >>>> learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support.
    >>>> But
    >>>> OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The
    >>>> laptops
    >>>> are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    >>>> customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting
    >>>> the
    >>>> $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    >>>> extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    >>>> aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    >>>> upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    >>>> track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    >>>> connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations.
    >>>> That
    >>>> standard, of course, is Windows.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>> Do we really want to expose these kids to the 'delights' of viruses,

    >> This is nothing compared to the real diseases and viruses (viri) they face
    >> in every day life. None of my computers have ever gotten a virus. Why is
    >> that?

    >
    > Luck, probably.


    Maybe, maybe not. While NAT frontends won't block the
    email spam trojans and phishing attempts, they *will*
    block the casual malware probes.

    OTOH, I get an awful lot of spam, and I generally don't
    have to worry about it. Why? Because my email clients are
    smart enough not to try to do stupid things like execute
    embedded scripts. (Or perhaps they're stupid enough not to
    try to be overly smart about things like executing embedded
    scripts. Mailx is really really really REALLY dumb. :-) )

    >
    >>
    >>> DRM

    >> Linux also has DRM. Take a look at the Amazon Kindle for example.

    >
    > What has that to do with a laptop OS? Nothing.


    DRM is such a nebulous animal anyway, especially in the
    context of a multilayered solution such as the modern
    Linux distro (or, for that matter, Windows -- the layers
    are there but more difficult to discern).

    Of course DRM assumes that one is guilty until proven innocent.
    I'm not a fan of that sort of thinking.

    >
    >>
    >>> activation

    >> I'm sure Microsoft could remove activation in about 1 day if they wanted
    >> too.

    >
    > But they don't, that's the point.


    Presumably, it would not be in their interest. I have
    no problem with that per se (especially since I can
    use alternative solutions such as Linux), though their
    implementation sucks.

    [snip]

    >
    >>
    >>> and all the bull**** that comes with Windows?

    >> Most of the problems are attributed to users who know absolutely nothing
    >> about computers. Put linux in the hands of these same 'computer morons' and
    >> you'll get similar results. For exampe... phishing scams are not OS
    >> specific.

    >
    > There are far more problemns that come with Windows than email scams.
    >


    Indeed...and some of them are by design. :-)

    [snip]


    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Does anyone else remember the 1802?

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  6. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:37:32 -0500, "Walter Smeddler"
    wrote:


    >I'm sure Microsoft could remove activation in about 1 day if they wanted
    >too.


    Seeing as the cracked copies of both XP and Vista hit the torrents
    before the released versions I would hope so

    >> snooping

    >Snooping? By the CIA and NSA of course. Take of the tinfoil helmet and don't
    >believe all the lies that Schestowitz posts.


    Schestowitz is definitely a tinfoil hat type, however I *do* believe
    the government is snooping at some level and hiding it all behind the
    patriot act.

    Are there back doors in Windows?
    I don't think so because it would have been leaked by now.
    Can back doors be installed in a Windows machine?
    Sure. They can be installed on a Mac and a Linux machine too.


    >> and all the bull**** that comes with Windows?

    >Most of the problems are attributed to users who know absolutely nothing
    >about computers. Put linux in the hands of these same 'computer morons' and
    >you'll get similar results. For exampe... phishing scams are not OS
    >specific.


    This is true.
    I have long maintained that Linux is more secure because it was built
    with security in mind. However, when the idiots get behind the
    keyboard in numbers that matter to hackers, all the security in the
    world won't help.
    As for Linux servers, they are generally run by people with skills,
    unlike Joe Six pack and his porn collection.

    Read the book "Hackers" for all kinds of insight into dumpster diving,
    social engineering etc.





  7. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 22:52:28 +0000, Kier wrote:

    >On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:37:32 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:
    >
    >>


    >>> Do we really want to expose these kids to the 'delights' of viruses,

    >> This is nothing compared to the real diseases and viruses (viri) they face
    >> in every day life. None of my computers have ever gotten a virus. Why is
    >> that?

    >
    >Luck, probably.


    Not really.
    Intelligent use of the computer is all it takes.
    I will grant you that Linux is more securely designed.


    >But they don't, that's the point.


    They don't have to, it's already been done for them


    >There are far more problemns that come with Windows than email scams.


    And much of it can be traced right back to the user.

    >>
    >>
    >>> I think not.

    >> Therefore you are not.

    >
    >I'm certainly not a fool.


  8. Re: OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough

    On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 17:20:47 -0500, Walter Smeddler wrote:

    > OLPC: When Good Design Isn't Enough
    >
    > http://www.greghinzmann.com/
    >
    > [quote]
    >
    > The OLPC laptop was designed to delight, engage, and enable children to
    > learn in ways their country's infrastructure doesn't currently support. But
    > OLPC laptops aren't purchased by the children. Or their parents. The laptops
    > are purchased by governments. What do you think these large institutional
    > customers care about? Price, yes, and OLPC has had a hard time meeting the
    > $100 price point, due in part to not being able to produce the product in
    > extremely large volumes. But these customers also care about important
    > aspects of the "whole product" like service, teacher training, and future
    > upgrades. Something OLPC cannot sufficiently address as a company with no
    > track record. The customers also want one more important feature, a
    > connection to an industry standard, the standard of developed nations. That
    > standard, of course, is Windows.


    Two problems here: 1) they come with windows - in particular the X
    windowing system - which has been functional far longer than the MS
    variant 2) MS would choke on as modest a system as this.

    >
    > The best designers act as advocates for the end user, working hard to create
    > a simple, elegant, and enjoyable experience for them. That works well when
    > the users and customers are one and the same. However, very often there are
    > intermediary customers that must also be considered. Maybe that's a little
    > more marketing strategy than designers want to be accountable for, but
    > ignoring the needs of the customer and solely focusing on the needs of the
    > user can be a losing strategy. Designers need to keep that in mind just as
    > much as marketers do.
    >
    >
    > [-quote]



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