Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio - Linux

This is a discussion on Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio - Linux ; http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892 After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2 CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz, ...

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Thread: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

  1. Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892

    After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2
    CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it
    properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can
    simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz,
    well above the maximum available sample rate on far more expensive
    commercial HDRs, with more available input tracks.

    With a real-time kernel distro and Ardour, of course.

    --
    He knows Jack about Linux!

  2. Re: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    Linonut wrote:

    > http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892
    >
    > After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2
    > CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it
    > properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can
    > simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz,
    > well above the maximum available sample rate on far more expensive
    > commercial HDRs, with more available input tracks.
    >
    > With a real-time kernel distro and Ardour, of course.
    >


    Now wait for flatfish to explain this is impossible
    Or way better in windows
    --
    Warning: 10 days have passed since your last Windows reinstall.


  3. Re: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    ____/ Peter Köhlmann on Tuesday 13 November 2007 21:40 : \____

    > Linonut wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892
    >>
    >> After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2
    >> CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it
    >> properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can
    >> simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz,
    >> well above the maximum available sample rate on far more expensive
    >> commercial HDRs, with more available input tracks.
    >>
    >> With a real-time kernel distro and Ardour, of course.
    >>

    >
    > Now wait for flatfish to explain this is impossible
    > Or way better in windows


    It won't be "flatfish[+++]" though (on too many killfiles already) and it's
    likely to be crossposted all over the place.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    ..oʍʇ sɐ buıɥʇ ɥɔns ou s,ǝɹǝɥʇ 'ɹǝpuǝq 'ʎɹɹoʍ ʇ,uop :ʎɹɟ
    ..oʍʇ ɐ ʍɐs ı ʇɥbnoɥʇ ı puɐ ...ǝɹǝɥʍʎɹǝʌǝ soɹǝz puɐ sǝuo .ɯɐǝɹp 1nɟʍɐ uɐ
    ʇɐɥʍ 'ɥɥɥɐ :ɹǝpuǝq

  4. Re: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    On Nov 13, 4:23 pm, Linonut wrote:
    > http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892
    >
    > After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2
    > CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it
    > properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can
    > simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz,
    > well above the maximum available sample rate on far more expensive
    > commercial HDRs, with more available input tracks.
    >
    > With a real-time kernel distro and Ardour, of course.


    Fine and Dandy (Teddy Wilson plays a mean version of that tune)...

    So now what do you do with your 24 tracks, or even your 1 or 2 tracks.
    Are you going to print to CD?
    Ok, I'll admit that more than quite a few excellent recordings have
    been made this way, the Sheffield Labs stuff with Doug Sax comes to
    mind (I know Scott will disagree on this one, but I think they sound
    great, most of them anyhow). Many fine classical recordings have been
    done x/y with two tracks.
    But realistically, using today's techniques, and specifically the
    tools that YOU have which probably do not include perfect acoustics
    and a set of Schoeps or AKG, to drop a couple of names, mics.

    IOW YOU need processing.
    So now what do you do?

    Can you run Waves?
    Bias Soundsoap?
    UAD?
    Any of the high end plugins that simulate channel strips/pre-amps/
    processors etc from some very high end consoles?
    How about reverb?
    Can you use programs with impulses recorded/designed around famous
    halls etc?
    Autotune (personal note, if you need this one, don't quit your day
    job).

    I could go on and on, but the point is streaming 24 tracks to a hard
    disk, no matter what the sample rate is, these days is trivial and you
    can get FREE Windows programs that can do it better than Linux could
    ever hope to.

    Try Reaper, it's free (nag screen if you don't register).
    There are others.

    All ths stuff I mention above, plus a million more high and not so
    high (like Linux for example) quality plugins run fine with these
    programs.

    Linux is a complete lost cause in the area of professional DAW work.
    Does it have the potential?
    Sure.
    Are professionals interested in Linux?
    Sure. We are poor and hate paying 10k for ProTools.
    Can Linux compete?
    Forget it.
    Even the free programs that come bundled with soundcards etc are
    better than anything Linux has.

    So in conclusion, yes, your Linux CAN stream 24 tracks to a hard disk.
    So what?>
    It's what you do AFTER the recording that counts, unless like I said
    you have access to really great mics, a perfect performance in a
    perfect hall.
    Or , you like totally raw sounding recordings, some people do and some
    fantastic records have been made that way.
    They are mostly 'flukes' though.

    flatfish+++

    (xposted to rec.audio.pro because it is on topic and I would like to
    hear some opinions outside the Linux loony tune (Not related to Warner
    Brothers BTW) world.


  5. Re: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    On Nov 13, 5:18 pm, Roy Schestowitz
    wrote:
    > ____/ Peter Khlmann on Tuesday 13 November 2007 21:40 : \____
    >
    >
    >
    > > Linonut wrote:

    >
    > >> http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9892

    >
    > >> After plugging this interface [RME Hammerfall HDSP Multiface 2
    > >> CardBus interface] in to my laptop and configuring it
    > >> properly, I have a multitrack hard disk recorder that can
    > >> simultaneously record 24 tracks at a maximum sample rate of 96KHz,
    > >> well above the maximum available sample rate on far more expensive
    > >> commercial HDRs, with more available input tracks.

    >
    > >> With a real-time kernel distro and Ardour, of course.

    >
    > > Now wait for flatfish to explain this is impossible
    > > Or way better in windows

    >
    > It won't be "flatfish[+++]" though (on too many killfiles already) and it's
    > likely to be crossposted all over the place.


    Get lost you bumbling idiot.
    You know absolutely nothing about this subject. I'm amazed you haven't
    figured out how to blame Bill Gates or the east coast reef mussels for
    Linux's lack of improvement in this area.

    While you SPAM all day long, draining your parents and the UK
    taxpayers bank accounts, others are out there actually using programs
    to perform WORK. I know W-O-R-K is the dirtiest 4 letter word in the
    realm of a commercial student, you, however at some point in your
    miserable life, Roy Schestowitz, you will have to get a job.
    While you might be able to milk another 10 years in school from your
    parents, you will have to at some point *work*.
    When that time comes, you will see the difference between hiding,
    *advocating* and SPAMMING and real life.

    IOW it's great to sit behind a keyboard telling people Linux DAWs are
    great.
    It's a totally different thing to try and use one in a professional
    setting.

    The same can be said about a slew of Linux applications.

    Fee software, freedom in general is fine as well but it all boils down
    to how good is the application and if it sucks, people don't care if
    it's free.

    Maybe that's why Linux desktop useage is so miserable.

    Think about it.
    Don't worry your brain cycles are free.
    Your parents will like that.
    Trust me.

    flatfish+++


  6. Re: Old laptop == Multi-track Linux audio

    wrote:
    >Ok, I'll admit that more than quite a few excellent recordings have
    >been made this way, the Sheffield Labs stuff with Doug Sax comes to
    >mind (I know Scott will disagree on this one, but I think they sound
    >great, most of them anyhow). Many fine classical recordings have been
    >done x/y with two tracks.


    Umm... no, I won't disagree with that, because I primarily advocate
    minimalist miking. It's what I mostly do.

    However, what I do NOT advocate is your constant trolling of linux people
    and leading them into silly crossposts into rec.audio.pro.

    >(xposted to rec.audio.pro because it is on topic and I would like to
    >hear some opinions outside the Linux loony tune (Not related to Warner
    >Brothers BTW) world.


    I don't understand your obsession with Linux. Please go away.
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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