Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth - Linux

This is a discussion on Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth - Linux ; Posted couple years ago, but still holds true on how market share is considered, which is unfair, to say the least. - HPT http://linux.sys-con.com/read/32648_p.htm Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth Evans Data survey shows that market share isn't judged by the ...

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  1. Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth

    Posted couple years ago, but still holds true on how market share
    is considered, which is unfair, to say the least. - HPT

    http://linux.sys-con.com/read/32648_p.htm

    Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth
    Evans Data survey shows that market share isn't judged by the
    same rules for Windows and Linux

    By: Nicholas Petreley

    Why the misconception

    There are dozens of reasons why people have underestimated how
    quickly Linux has been grabbing Windows' market share, but the
    Evans data confirms one of my pet theories. Windows market share
    is usually estimated by the units of Windows Microsoft claims to
    have shipped. This figure is already skewed, because it includes
    every unsold box of Windows XP sitting on shelves at Best Buy or
    Circuit City. More significant, however, is the fact that it
    includes every PC with a pre-installed version of Windows.

    Linux market share, on the other hand, is usually estimated based
    on surveys, number of commercial boxes sold and the number of
    downloads.

    The actual market-share shift from Windows to Linux is obviously
    more complicated. When someone purchases a PC with Windows
    pre-installed, and then overwrites that pre-installed Windows
    with Linux, nobody subtracts "one" from the installed base of
    Windows and then recalculates the Windows market share. So
    Windows starts out with a false boost and maintains its illusory
    market share even as it gets replaced by Linux.
    Assuming you could get a reliable snapshot of Windows and Linux
    machines installed, there is yet another complicating factor that
    renders this less-meaningful. Linux runs on far more hardware
    platforms, including those that outperform Intel-based systems.
    Even on Intel, Linux outperforms Windows. Let's say one company
    installs two Linux servers, but the company next door chooses
    five Windows servers to handle the same load. In this case, the
    market-share growth for Windows and Linux would be equal in one
    respect (the amount of work performed by the servers) but skewed
    to favor Windows with respect to the way market share is
    represented for public consumption (the actual number of units in
    use). Once you include Linux on non-Intel hardware, which can
    mean anything up to a mainframe, the disparity becomes even more
    dramatic. The irony here is that Windows gets an unfair
    market-share boost because it is inferior to Linux and requires
    more installations to do the same work.

  2. Re: Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth

    On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 20:23:39 +0900, High Plains Thumper
    wrote:

    Yeah, right, keep debunking:

    http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=2

  3. Re: Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth

    OK wrote:
    > On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 20:23:39 +0900, High Plains Thumper
    > wrote:
    >
    > Yeah, right, keep debunking:
    >
    > http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=2


    For one, let's look at the job market:

    http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/car...le.php/3697896

    Linux Job Market Trends: Galloping Forward
    September 5, 2007
    By James Maguire

    The numbers, clearly, point to a major industry trend.

    Take a look: Dice, the tech jobs site, reports that it had 9,631
    Linux job listings in August. While this is a big number, what’s
    truly eye-catching is the percentage growth since January: Linux
    job listing are up a robust 30 percent – three times the increase
    of overall tech job listings. (Since January, Dice job listings
    have grown by 10.2 percent, to a total of 96,548 tech jobs.)

    To be sure, Linux jobs continue to trail the mighty Windows,
    which had 16,895 listings. Linux also falls behind Unix – still
    healthy after all these years – which boasted 14,954 listings.
    (The AIX flavor of Unix had 2,302 jobs, and Solaris posted 4,055.)
    As far as jobs go, let's see:

    9,631 - Linux
    14,954 - Unix
    16,895 - Windows

    Linux compared to Windows is over half of Windows. Combining
    Linux and Unix (24,585) exceeds that of Windows.

    Linux is not gaining?

    Best rethink your flawed statistics.

    --
    HPT

  4. Re: Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth

    On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 10:09:12 +0900, High Plains Thumper
    wrote:

    >OK wrote:
    >> On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 20:23:39 +0900, High Plains Thumper
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> Yeah, right, keep debunking:
    >>
    >> http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=2

    >
    >For one, let's look at the job market:
    >
    >http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/car...le.php/3697896
    >
    >
    >Linux Job Market Trends: Galloping Forward
    >September 5, 2007
    >By James Maguire
    >
    >The numbers, clearly, point to a major industry trend.
    >
    >Take a look: Dice, the tech jobs site, reports that it had 9,631
    >Linux job listings in August. While this is a big number, what’s
    >truly eye-catching is the percentage growth since January: Linux
    >job listing are up a robust 30 percent – three times the increase
    >of overall tech job listings. (Since January, Dice job listings
    >have grown by 10.2 percent, to a total of 96,548 tech jobs.)
    >
    >To be sure, Linux jobs continue to trail the mighty Windows,
    >which had 16,895 listings. Linux also falls behind Unix – still
    >healthy after all these years – which boasted 14,954 listings.
    >(The AIX flavor of Unix had 2,302 jobs, and Solaris posted 4,055.)
    >
    >
    >As far as jobs go, let's see:
    >
    > 9,631 - Linux
    >14,954 - Unix
    >16,895 - Windows
    >
    >Linux compared to Windows is over half of Windows. Combining
    >Linux and Unix (24,585) exceeds that of Windows.


    It just means that Unix/Linux needs a lot more sysadmins.

    Something we all know.

  5. Re: Debunking the Linux-Windows market-share myth

    OK wrote:
    > High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >> OK wrote:
    >>> High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, right, keep debunking:
    >>>
    >>> http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=2

    >>
    >> For one, let's look at the job market:
    >>
    >> http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/car...le.php/3697896
    >>
    >>
    >> Linux Job Market Trends: Galloping Forward
    >> September 5, 2007 By James Maguire
    >>
    >> The numbers, clearly, point to a major industry trend.
    >>
    >> Take a look: Dice, the tech jobs site, reports that it had
    >> 9,631 Linux job listings in August. While this is a big
    >> number, what’s truly eye-catching is the percentage growth
    >> since January: Linux job listing are up a robust 30 percent
    >> – three times the increase of overall tech job listings.
    >> (Since January, Dice job listings have grown by 10.2
    >> percent, to a total of 96,548 tech jobs.)
    >>
    >> To be sure, Linux jobs continue to trail the mighty Windows,
    >> which had 16,895 listings. Linux also falls behind Unix –
    >> still healthy after all these years – which boasted 14,954
    >> listings. (The AIX flavor of Unix had 2,302 jobs, and
    >> Solaris posted 4,055.)
    >>
    >>
    >> As far as jobs go, let's see:
    >>
    >> 9,631 - Linux
    >> 14,954 - Unix
    >> 16,895 - Windows
    >>
    >> Linux compared to Windows is over half of Windows.
    >> Combining Linux and Unix (24,585) exceeds that of Windows.

    >
    > It just means that Unix/Linux needs a lot more sysadmins.
    >
    > Something we all know.


    Yeah, right .... not.

    http://www.drinky.org.uk/computing/l...windowsnetwork

    TCO is a 2 way game and ulimately has never been proven either
    way. Linux is cheaper to buy and is cheaper to maintain, since it
    does not crash obscurely and can run for years without problem.
    It either works or it doesn't work at all. There are many stories
    of people uncovering a forgotten Linux machine chugging away. So
    long in fact that they didn't even know what it did any more
    until they turned it off and stuff started to fail. Stanford
    University found one bricked up in a forgotten cupboard that was
    still running the DNS system. They didn't know this until they
    found it and turned it off. If Linux works it will stay working
    in most scenarios until the hardware fails. Now *thats* uptime.
    There are also stories of Windows sysadmin asking their colleague
    how he got months of uptime from his Windows NT server when
    theirs had to be rebooted every few days. His answer? I use
    Linux. Their reply? What's Linux. Hmmmm...
    --
    HPT

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