Asus Eee PC 701 - Linux

This is a discussion on Asus Eee PC 701 - Linux ; Okay, you've heard about it and there has been a lot of buzz around this little piece of gear. I purchased the 701 and have had it for all of 2 days, but so far I have to say I ...

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Thread: Asus Eee PC 701

  1. Asus Eee PC 701

    Okay, you've heard about it and there has been a lot of buzz around this
    little piece of gear. I purchased the 701 and have had it for all of 2
    days, but so far I have to say I am pleased.

    What precipitated this was the office purchasing a blackberry for me. The
    blackberry is not a bad unit. It makes a decent email client and web
    browser if you are on the go. Other than that, I haven't much use for it.
    The screen is too small do to any sort of administration, be it ssh, vnc
    or rdesktop. And trying to do web admin isn't much better. But what do
    you expect on a 2" screen.

    So I decided to get something small so I could do remote administration.
    It wasn't a matter of cost as I could've taken a lease on something else.
    And the Eee PC is small and light. If you open your hands with fingers
    together and put your thumbs together. That's about how large it is
    closed. The battery makes up about 60-70% of the weight, and it's
    probably as heavy as the average CD/DVD drive. It looks like there's only
    a single mouse button, but in actual fact, it's a single button on a
    rocker. Press it to the left, it's left click; to the right... you get
    the idea.

    It comes with a custom install of Xandros 4 and their own "Easy" GUI on
    top of KDE/X11. As I've got a few years of Linux under my belt, I decided
    to switch out to the "Full Desktop" which is just a KDE desktop. It has
    krdc installed, but I prefer the command line for rdesktop and vnc. I
    ended up downloading some debian packages from the debian archive and
    while not strictly compatible, most packages work without issue. These
    included telnet, vncviewer and irssi.

    Today, I received a call from my boss who wanted me to look something up.
    Instead of using my brother's machine (I was at his place), I fired up
    the laptop and checked the stats with it. Saved me a lot of grief.

    At the end of the day, I would never recommend this as anything remotely
    like a desktop replacement. I wouldn't even recommend it as first
    computer for the simple reason that the screen resolution is far too
    small. If a person was looking for that at the $400 price point, I'd
    recommend scouting around for a used P3 or P4 laptop. Or if you can, save
    up a few extra months and buy a new low-end laptop (ie. the Toshiba
    A200). However, if you are a mobile professional and need something in
    size between a laptop and a PDA, this is a clear winner. For example, as
    an administrator, it's small enough that I can put it into my shoulder
    bag and go out for a few hours without it being a burden, but it's large
    enough that if needed, I can do real work.

    Final Verdict:

    Pros:
    Small and Light making it very portable.
    Low price (C$400)
    4-5 hour battery life (I haven't tested this)
    3 USB 2.0 Ports
    1 SD/MMC Port
    Integrated 802.11b/g
    10/100 Ethernet
    VGA Output (See cons)
    Will boot from USB, SD or On-board Flash
    (this means you can install to SD or USB as well)

    Cons:
    Small. Screen is a mere 800x480 which some apps are not well suited to.
    VGA Output only does 800x480. IMO, the VGA Output was pointless.
    Ethernet/Wifi is based on the Atheros chipset which some distros
    (cough*debian*cough) do not support out of the box.
    Only 4GB of "Hard Drive" space

    Honorable Mentions:
    CD Includes XP Drivers.

    My rating: 4 out of 5. It'd get a 5 if they had ditched the speakers and
    installed a larger screen with a more conventional resolution (read:
    800x600). (You want sound? Use the headphone jack.)

  2. Re: Asus Eee PC 701

    alt wrote:
    >

    [...]
    > It looks like there's only
    > a single mouse button, but in actual fact, it's a single button on a
    > rocker. Press it to the left, it's left click; to the right... you get
    > the idea.
    >


    How do you paste in X?


  3. Re: Asus Eee PC 701

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, owl

    wrote
    on Fri, 9 Nov 2007 14:32:14 +0000 (UTC)
    :
    > alt wrote:
    >>

    > [...]
    >> It looks like there's only
    >> a single mouse button, but in actual fact, it's a single button on a
    >> rocker. Press it to the left, it's left click; to the right... you get
    >> the idea.
    >>

    >
    > How do you paste in X?
    >


    X doesn't handle the pasting, really, although it has
    enabling facilities. The actual pasting is done through
    property communication (where X supports the properties),
    and X does handle a selection token, which guarantees that
    at most one program has a highlighted region (and other
    programs, when requested to paste, can find that program).
    At this point I'd have to look up the details.

    (Personally, I'd like to see more programs maintain a
    highlighted dual-color mode, where the program, if its
    normal display is black-on-white, shows black-on-gray or
    white-on-gray if it doesn't have the selection token,
    and white-on-black (inverted) if it does. The colors,
    of course, are negotiable. Most X-based programs today
    will lose the selection region if another program grabs
    the token.)

    Depending on application and widget set, there are three
    methods (at least);

    [1] Highlight using left mouse button, move over
    to destination window, press middle mouse button.
    Text/graphics/etc. will be pasted at the point of the
    click. Many older programs in X such as xterm support
    this particular pasting method.

    [2] Highlight using left mouse button, hit control/C to
    copy. Move over to destination window, click using *left*
    mouse button or use arrow keys to set insertion position,
    then hit control/V to paste at that position. This is the
    "Windows emulation" pasting method.

    [3] Highlight using left mouse button, pick the menu entry
    Edit -> Copy. Move over to destination window, click using
    left mouse button or use arrow keys to set insertion psoition,
    pick menu entry Edit -> Paste.

    One can also attempt to mix and match, though the results
    are variable. There are issues if the window one is
    pasting from exits before one pastes.

    Since many mice are two buttons only, a third possibility
    involves emulating the middle mouse click by simultaneously
    using left and right mouse buttons. Many *other* mice
    have a thumbwheel, which in my case at least can be
    depressed for the middle mouse button; the up and down
    movement of the wheel gives one two additional "buttons",
    which most X application programs interpret as scroll up
    and scroll down.

    A utility program called 'xev' might be of assistance
    if one is having trouble with the buttons. Fire up a
    terminal emulator and run xev therein; one should see
    some text output. Each line or two of text represents a
    printable version of an XEvent that the window receives,
    and the program prints out.

    Position the cursor within the xev window (xev actually
    has two windows, one in the other), and click. The output
    from xev should tell you whether the mouse buttons are
    functioning as one expects:

    ButtonPress event, serial 26, synthetic NO, window 0x3400001,
    root 0x70, subw 0x0, time 631483178, (124,93), root701,831),
    state 0x0, button 1, same_screen YES

    Most of this is so much technical crap, but the important
    bits are the position, button, window, and state.

    Position is a pair of two integers, each integer being a
    number of pixels, (124,93) in the above, which is relative
    to the windows' upper left corner, with Y going *down*.

    Button is 1 through 5, or if one prefers Button1 through
    Button5 in /usr/include/X11/X.h which a few programmers
    (myself included) might still use explicitly.

    Window is an X window identifier, expressed in hex. It's
    returned by XCreateWindow or XCreateSimpleWindow, if a
    program is actually creating the window. For most purposes
    it's an abstract token to the application program that it
    should hold onto -- assuming the program goes down to
    that level; most programs will simply use a widget set
    such as Qt (KDE) or Gtk (Gnome), which imposes its own
    rules.

    State is only an issue if one has SHIFT (0x1), CAPS LOCK
    (0x2), or CTRL (0x4) pressed at the time one clicks.
    (My window manager intercepts ALT-click events, so I can't
    say what ALT is. The shift, caps lock, and control will
    also show up as key presses in xev. Programmatically, one
    can reference these values by using ShiftMask, LockMask, or
    ControlMask; it is possible to OR them together as well.)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Windows Vista. It'll Fix Everything(tm).

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: Asus Eee PC 701

    On Fri, 09 Nov 2007 10:52:12 -0800, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

    > Since many mice are two buttons only, a third possibility
    > involves emulating the middle mouse click by simultaneously
    > using left and right mouse buttons. Many *other* mice
    > have a thumbwheel, which in my case at least can be
    > depressed for the middle mouse button; the up and down
    > movement of the wheel gives one two additional "buttons",
    > which most X application programs interpret as scroll up
    > and scroll down.


    The problem here is that the mouse button is a rocker. You can't press
    both left and right at the same time, so that's out.

    Though you might be able to tap the pad at the same time as press the
    right side of the rocker.



  5. Re: Asus Eee PC 701

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, alt

    wrote
    on Fri, 09 Nov 2007 11:18:16 -0800
    :
    > On Fri, 09 Nov 2007 10:52:12 -0800, The Ghost In The Machine wrote:
    >
    >> Since many mice are two buttons only, a third possibility
    >> involves emulating the middle mouse click by simultaneously
    >> using left and right mouse buttons. Many *other* mice
    >> have a thumbwheel, which in my case at least can be
    >> depressed for the middle mouse button; the up and down
    >> movement of the wheel gives one two additional "buttons",
    >> which most X application programs interpret as scroll up
    >> and scroll down.

    >
    > The problem here is that the mouse button is a rocker. You can't press
    > both left and right at the same time, so that's out.
    >
    > Though you might be able to tap the pad at the same time as press the
    > right side of the rocker.
    >


    Egads. This is absolutely bizarre -- a mouse that cannot
    support 3button emulation mode.

    Wow.

    Well, can't say I know anything about it. :-)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C++ Programming Idea #110309238:
    item * f(item *p) { if(p = NULL) return new item; else return p; }

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  6. Re: Asus Eee PC 701

    On Nov 9, 9:05 pm, The Ghost In The Machine
    wrote:
    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, alt
    >
    > wrote
    > on Fri, 09 Nov 2007 11:18:16 -0800
    > :
    >
    > > The problem here is that the mouse button is a rocker. You can't press
    > > both left and right at the same time, so that's out.

    >
    > > Though you might be able to tap the pad at the same time as press the
    > > right side of the rocker.

    >
    > Egads. This is absolutely bizarre -- a mouse that cannot
    > support 3button emulation mode.


    There is a solution, though: you do not need to emulate the 3rd
    button. As long as you have two fingers left on any hand, just tap
    with both of them.

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