Spaces question - Linux

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  1. Spaces question

    If you have an application with several windows open is there any way to
    easily get all windows from that application to move to another space? Is
    there a way to do this with most virtual desktop solutions... on OS X or
    Linux? Just curious as to what solution other similar systems have for
    this. I know you can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can select multiple items
    at once.


    --
    Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments
    that take our breath away.




  2. Re: Spaces question

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700
    :
    > If you have an application with several windows open
    > is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    > application to move to another space?


    Define "space", "window set", and "application". There is
    a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have to look up
    the details) which allows an application to identify related
    windows, so that a window manager can see them as a group
    later, but I don't think it's used that often, and some
    window managers might simply ignore it for all I know.

    It is not clear whether the window manager will move the
    dialogs related to a window into another workspace, either.
    In the case of KDE or Gnome one can simply drag a rectangle in
    the workspace widget (a small widget usually placed
    in the panel), and upon release the window manager will
    unmap the window and move it to the requisite spot.

    In the case of Gnome the window will inherit the position
    in the screen; if one wants to adjust the window visually
    it must be visible. I don't know KDE's behavior in this area
    but suspect it's vaguely similar.

    > Is
    > there a way to do this with most virtual desktop
    > solutions... on OS X or Linux? Just curious as to what
    > solution other similar systems have for this. I know you
    > can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    > from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can
    > select multiple items at once.
    >


    Most X window managers operate on only one window or window
    group at a time, and the window group is application-identified,
    not user-identified, as I've stated above.

    Followups to COLA exclusively.

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Linux. Because life's too short for a buggy OS.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  3. Re: Spaces question

    "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    e5g405-gun.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 2:56 PM:

    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >
    > wrote
    > on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700
    > :
    >> If you have an application with several windows open
    >> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >> application to move to another space?

    >
    > Define "space", "window set", and "application".


    Space: a virtual desktop
    Window set: I did not use that term... not sure what you mean
    Application: a program... as generally used in a GUI environment

    > There is a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have to look up the
    > details) which allows an application to identify related windows, so that a
    > window manager can see them as a group later, but I don't think it's used that
    > often, and some window managers might simply ignore it for all I know.


    So it might... maybe... perhaps... do what I asked about. Ok.

    > It is not clear whether the window manager will move the dialogs related to a
    > window into another workspace, either. In the case of KDE or Gnome one can
    > simply drag a rectangle in the workspace widget (a small widget usually placed
    > in the panel), and upon release the window manager will unmap the window and
    > move it to the requisite spot.


    Not sure what you mean here...

    > In the case of Gnome the window will inherit the position in the screen; if
    > one wants to adjust the window visually it must be visible. I don't know
    > KDE's behavior in this area but suspect it's vaguely similar.
    >
    >> Is
    >> there a way to do this with most virtual desktop
    >> solutions... on OS X or Linux? Just curious as to what
    >> solution other similar systems have for this. I know you
    >> can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    >> from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can
    >> select multiple items at once.
    >>

    >
    > Most X window managers operate on only one window or window
    > group at a time, and the window group is application-identified,
    > not user-identified, as I've stated above.
    >
    > Followups to COLA exclusively.




    --
    What do you call people who are afraid of Santa Claus? Claustrophobic.


  4. Re: Spaces question

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 15:12:56 -0700
    :
    > "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    > e5g405-gun.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 2:56 PM:
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700
    >> :
    >>> If you have an application with several windows open
    >>> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >>> application to move to another space?

    >>
    >> Define "space", "window set", and "application".

    >
    > Space: a virtual desktop
    > Window set: I did not use that term... not sure what you mean


    Window set: a set of windows. I for one would think
    that fairly obvious, though I'm not sure how to properly
    identify a set of windows to the window manager. The
    best one might do is select a series of list entries or
    icons -- and that's not all that intuitive.

    > Application: a program... as generally used in a GUI environment


    Applications get a little complicated. For example,
    OpenOffice can have multiple windows open, each with its
    own document. Without consulting the process list or
    killing a process, it's hard to tell that these windows
    are all being controlled by a master process.

    Contrariwise, some other applications might simply open a
    single window and that's it. A slightly more sophisticated
    application might open its window, then fork() off children
    when a user requests another window to be opened. (There
    are a few issues with this approach.)

    >
    >> There is a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have
    >> to look up the details) which allows an application to
    >> identify related windows, so that a window manager can
    >> see them as a group later, but I don't think it's used that
    >> often, and some window managers might simply ignore it
    >> for all I know.

    >
    > So it might... maybe... perhaps... do what I asked about. Ok.


    Depends on the app.

    >
    >> It is not clear whether the window manager will move
    >> the dialogs related to a window into another workspace,
    >> either. In the case of KDE or Gnome one can
    >> simply drag a rectangle in the workspace widget (a small
    >> widget usually placed in the panel), and upon release the
    >> window manager will unmap the window and move it to the
    >> requisite spot.

    >
    > Not sure what you mean here...


    The Gnome workspace widget is a rectangular area in the
    Gnome panel, subdivided into a series of smaller panels.
    In my case the widget is at the lower right, just to the
    right of the process status widget, which shows processor,
    memory, and network utilization, among other things.
    Rows and columns are configurable; since I like long
    and skinny I have 1 row, 12 columns, for 12 workspaces.
    The default configuration is 4 workspaces. The actual
    height of the workspace widget in my case is about 24
    pixels (out of 1050); the width is about 400 (out of 1680).

    Each small panel represents a workspace; the current
    workspace is highlighted in a different color, and is
    identified with the visible screen; whatever happens on
    the screen will be reflected in miniature in the workspace,
    albeit imperfectly as the workspace widget does not attempt
    to do anything more sophisticated colorwise apart from
    displaying a logo if the rectangle and the window are big
    enough. If one has a dozen windows open (not iconified),
    one sees a dozen little rectangles, overlapping themselves
    in a way identical to what's happening on the rest of
    the screen.

    The currently colored workspace will be updated as windows
    (including dialog boxes) open and close on the screen.
    The user can click on the widget to change workspaces, or
    hover over the widget and use the thumbwheel to rapidly
    move through the workspaces -- a nice feature, in my
    estimation. If the user presses and drags a rectangle,
    the rectangle will show a drop indication; the user can
    then move and drop the rectangle on another one of the
    workspace panels in the widget, and the window will move to
    that workspace. If the new workspace is the current one,
    the window becomes visible; if the old workspace is the
    current one, the window becomes invisible.

    Note that windows cannot straddle workspaces; if the user
    attempts to position a window partially outside the current
    workspace, then shift to the next or previous workspace,
    he'll see nothing. In the current workspace, the window
    is clipped to the edge of the screen.

    I'd have to look regarding the exact property changes,
    but properties are generally invisible anyway to
    the casual user. One can use xprop or the library
    call XGetWindowProperty(3) and XListProperties(3)
    to get the window properties. XChangeProperty(3) and
    XDeleteProperty(3) can be used to modify a property with
    some care. (Most application programs, never mind users,
    won't even bother with all this; the widget set does much
    of the muckywork.)

    >
    >> In the case of Gnome the window will inherit the position in the screen; if
    >> one wants to adjust the window visually it must be visible. I don't know
    >> KDE's behavior in this area but suspect it's vaguely similar.
    >>
    >>> Is
    >>> there a way to do this with most virtual desktop
    >>> solutions... on OS X or Linux? Just curious as to what
    >>> solution other similar systems have for this. I know you
    >>> can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    >>> from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can
    >>> select multiple items at once.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Most X window managers operate on only one window or window
    >> group at a time, and the window group is application-identified,
    >> not user-identified, as I've stated above.
    >>
    >> Followups to COLA exclusively.

    >
    >
    >



    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C/C++ Programming Idea #2239120:
    void f(char *p) {char *q = p; strcpy(p,q); }

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  5. Re: Spaces question

    "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    0bm405-63p.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 4:41 PM:

    >>>> If you have an application with several windows open
    >>>> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >>>> application to move to another space?
    >>>
    >>> Define "space", "window set", and "application".

    >>
    >> Space: a virtual desktop
    >> Window set: I did not use that term... not sure what you mean

    >
    > Window set: a set of windows. I for one would think
    > that fairly obvious, though I'm not sure how to properly
    > identify a set of windows to the window manager. The
    > best one might do is select a series of list entries or
    > icons -- and that's not all that intuitive.


    I would hope we could stick to the topic: can an virtual desktop solution
    you know of move all windows from an application from one space to another?

    Not sure where you are going.

    >> Application: a program... as generally used in a GUI environment

    >
    > Applications get a little complicated.


    Nope, at least not generally and as applies to the question I am asking.

    If you have 6 windows open from, say, Firefox, can you move them all at the
    same time. No need to make things more complex than that... sure, there may
    be some examples where things would not work as a user might expect but that
    should be rare and I am more concerned with the general case than the
    exceptions.

    > For example, OpenOffice can have multiple windows open, each with its own
    > document. Without consulting the process list or killing a process, it's hard
    > to tell that these windows are all being controlled by a master process.


    Sure - it might fail for that. OK.

    > Contrariwise, some other applications might simply open a single window and
    > that's it. A slightly more sophisticated application might open its window,
    > then fork() off children when a user requests another window to be opened.
    > (There are a few issues with this approach.)


    Sure: if document A crashes OpenOffice all docs are lost... well, all
    non-saved changes are.
    >>
    >>> There is a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have
    >>> to look up the details) which allows an application to
    >>> identify related windows, so that a window manager can
    >>> see them as a group later, but I don't think it's used that
    >>> often, and some window managers might simply ignore it
    >>> for all I know.

    >>
    >> So it might... maybe... perhaps... do what I asked about. Ok.

    >
    > Depends on the app.
    >
    >>
    >>> It is not clear whether the window manager will move
    >>> the dialogs related to a window into another workspace,
    >>> either. In the case of KDE or Gnome one can
    >>> simply drag a rectangle in the workspace widget (a small
    >>> widget usually placed in the panel), and upon release the
    >>> window manager will unmap the window and move it to the
    >>> requisite spot.

    >>
    >> Not sure what you mean here...

    >
    > The Gnome workspace widget is a rectangular area in the
    > Gnome panel, subdivided into a series of smaller panels.
    > In my case the widget is at the lower right, just to the
    > right of the process status widget, which shows processor,
    > memory, and network utilization, among other things.
    > Rows and columns are configurable; since I like long
    > and skinny I have 1 row, 12 columns, for 12 workspaces.
    > The default configuration is 4 workspaces. The actual
    > height of the workspace widget in my case is about 24
    > pixels (out of 1050); the width is about 400 (out of 1680).
    >
    > Each small panel represents a workspace; the current
    > workspace is highlighted in a different color, and is
    > identified with the visible screen; whatever happens on
    > the screen will be reflected in miniature in the workspace,
    > albeit imperfectly as the workspace widget does not attempt
    > to do anything more sophisticated colorwise apart from
    > displaying a logo if the rectangle and the window are big
    > enough. If one has a dozen windows open (not iconified),
    > one sees a dozen little rectangles, overlapping themselves
    > in a way identical to what's happening on the rest of
    > the screen.
    >
    > The currently colored workspace will be updated as windows
    > (including dialog boxes) open and close on the screen.
    > The user can click on the widget to change workspaces, or
    > hover over the widget and use the thumbwheel to rapidly
    > move through the workspaces -- a nice feature, in my
    > estimation. If the user presses and drags a rectangle,
    > the rectangle will show a drop indication; the user can
    > then move and drop the rectangle on another one of the
    > workspace panels in the widget, and the window will move to
    > that workspace. If the new workspace is the current one,
    > the window becomes visible; if the old workspace is the
    > current one, the window becomes invisible.
    >
    > Note that windows cannot straddle workspaces; if the user
    > attempts to position a window partially outside the current
    > workspace, then shift to the next or previous workspace,
    > he'll see nothing. In the current workspace, the window
    > is clipped to the edge of the screen.
    >
    > I'd have to look regarding the exact property changes,
    > but properties are generally invisible anyway to
    > the casual user. One can use xprop or the library
    > call XGetWindowProperty(3) and XListProperties(3)
    > to get the window properties. XChangeProperty(3) and
    > XDeleteProperty(3) can be used to modify a property with
    > some care. (Most application programs, never mind users,
    > won't even bother with all this; the widget set does much
    > of the muckywork.)


    How is that relevant to my question?

    >>> In the case of Gnome the window will inherit the position in the screen; if
    >>> one wants to adjust the window visually it must be visible. I don't know
    >>> KDE's behavior in this area but suspect it's vaguely similar.
    >>>
    >>>> Is
    >>>> there a way to do this with most virtual desktop
    >>>> solutions... on OS X or Linux? Just curious as to what
    >>>> solution other similar systems have for this. I know you
    >>>> can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    >>>> from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can
    >>>> select multiple items at once.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Most X window managers operate on only one window or window
    >>> group at a time, and the window group is application-identified,
    >>> not user-identified, as I've stated above.
    >>>
    >>> Followups to COLA exclusively.

    >>
    >>
    >>

    >




    --
    "Innovation is not about saying yes to everything. It's about saying NO to
    all but the most crucial features." -- Steve Jobs




  6. Re: Spaces question

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit

    wrote
    on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 17:57:33 -0700
    :
    > "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    > 0bm405-63p.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 4:41 PM:
    >
    >>>>> If you have an application with several windows open
    >>>>> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >>>>> application to move to another space?
    >>>>
    >>>> Define "space", "window set", and "application".
    >>>
    >>> Space: a virtual desktop
    >>> Window set: I did not use that term... not sure what you mean

    >>
    >> Window set: a set of windows. I for one would think
    >> that fairly obvious, though I'm not sure how to properly
    >> identify a set of windows to the window manager. The
    >> best one might do is select a series of list entries or
    >> icons -- and that's not all that intuitive.

    >
    > I would hope we could stick to the topic: can an
    > virtual desktop solution you know of move all windows
    > from an application from one space to another?


    Not at the present time. The main issues, however,
    involve specification of the windows.

    >
    > Not sure where you are going.
    >
    >>> Application: a program... as generally used in a GUI environment

    >>
    >> Applications get a little complicated.

    >
    > Nope, at least not generally and as applies to the
    > question I am asking.


    > If you have 6 windows open from, say, Firefox, can you
    > move them all at the same time.


    No. This is a major deficiency in X/Gnome, but it's easily
    fixable; the main problem is that the window manager needs
    to be able to readily identify those windows that need to
    be moved.

    There are also issues if Firefox windows are scattered
    over different workspaces. Presumably, there are two
    workcases here:

    - move all windows of the given application that are
    on the current workspace to another workspace
    - move all windows of the given application (regardless
    of current workspace) to another workspace

    I would assume the first is what one wants, though the
    second is easier to program. Neither is possible as
    of right now.

    > No need to make things more complex than that... sure,
    > there may be some examples where things would not work
    > as a user might expect but that should be rare and I am
    > more concerned with the general case than the exceptions.
    >
    >> For example, OpenOffice can have multiple windows open,
    >> each with its own document. Without consulting the process
    >> list or killing a process, it's hard to tell that these
    >> windows are all being controlled by a master process.

    >
    > Sure - it might fail for that. OK.
    >
    >> Contrariwise, some other applications might simply open a single window and
    >> that's it. A slightly more sophisticated application might open its window,
    >> then fork() off children when a user requests another window to be opened.
    >> (There are a few issues with this approach.)

    >
    > Sure: if document A crashes OpenOffice all docs are lost... well,
    > all non-saved changes are.
    >>>
    >>>> There is a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have
    >>>> to look up the details) which allows an application to
    >>>> identify related windows, so that a window manager can
    >>>> see them as a group later, but I don't think it's used that
    >>>> often, and some window managers might simply ignore it
    >>>> for all I know.
    >>>
    >>> So it might... maybe... perhaps... do what I asked about. Ok.

    >>
    >> Depends on the app.
    >>
    >>>
    >>>> It is not clear whether the window manager will move
    >>>> the dialogs related to a window into another workspace,
    >>>> either. In the case of KDE or Gnome one can
    >>>> simply drag a rectangle in the workspace widget (a small
    >>>> widget usually placed in the panel), and upon release the
    >>>> window manager will unmap the window and move it to the
    >>>> requisite spot.
    >>>
    >>> Not sure what you mean here...

    >>
    >> The Gnome workspace widget is a rectangular area in the
    >> Gnome panel, subdivided into a series of smaller panels.
    >> In my case the widget is at the lower right, just to the
    >> right of the process status widget, which shows processor,
    >> memory, and network utilization, among other things.
    >> Rows and columns are configurable; since I like long
    >> and skinny I have 1 row, 12 columns, for 12 workspaces.
    >> The default configuration is 4 workspaces. The actual
    >> height of the workspace widget in my case is about 24
    >> pixels (out of 1050); the width is about 400 (out of 1680).
    >>
    >> Each small panel represents a workspace; the current
    >> workspace is highlighted in a different color, and is
    >> identified with the visible screen; whatever happens on
    >> the screen will be reflected in miniature in the workspace,
    >> albeit imperfectly as the workspace widget does not attempt
    >> to do anything more sophisticated colorwise apart from
    >> displaying a logo if the rectangle and the window are big
    >> enough. If one has a dozen windows open (not iconified),
    >> one sees a dozen little rectangles, overlapping themselves
    >> in a way identical to what's happening on the rest of
    >> the screen.
    >>
    >> The currently colored workspace will be updated as windows
    >> (including dialog boxes) open and close on the screen.
    >> The user can click on the widget to change workspaces, or
    >> hover over the widget and use the thumbwheel to rapidly
    >> move through the workspaces -- a nice feature, in my
    >> estimation. If the user presses and drags a rectangle,
    >> the rectangle will show a drop indication; the user can
    >> then move and drop the rectangle on another one of the
    >> workspace panels in the widget, and the window will move to
    >> that workspace. If the new workspace is the current one,
    >> the window becomes visible; if the old workspace is the
    >> current one, the window becomes invisible.
    >>
    >> Note that windows cannot straddle workspaces; if the user
    >> attempts to position a window partially outside the current
    >> workspace, then shift to the next or previous workspace,
    >> he'll see nothing. In the current workspace, the window
    >> is clipped to the edge of the screen.
    >>
    >> I'd have to look regarding the exact property changes,
    >> but properties are generally invisible anyway to
    >> the casual user. One can use xprop or the library
    >> call XGetWindowProperty(3) and XListProperties(3)
    >> to get the window properties. XChangeProperty(3) and
    >> XDeleteProperty(3) can be used to modify a property with
    >> some care. (Most application programs, never mind users,
    >> won't even bother with all this; the widget set does much
    >> of the muckywork.)

    >
    > How is that relevant to my question?


    Simply a description of what Gnome brings to the table,
    regarding workspace management. I was hoping it clarified
    things for you; it's fairly intuitive regarding single
    windows but fails utterly when regarding a set of
    application windows.

    Presumably, one needs a dropdown menu option: Move All
    Windows of Application To > [workspace entries] as a bare
    minimum, and this is not sufficient from an intuition
    standpoint. The system should allow for a simple dropdown
    menu on the widget that allows for move of all windows;
    once the dropdown menu is picked, the window or window
    cluster would attach to a drag, and the user simply clicks
    on the desired destination panel.

    This is a request you'll need to forward to the Gnome
    development team. Dropdowns are theoretically possible;
    flyovers on the workspace widget are already present
    (though for some reason my version doesn't have them).

    Unfortunately, the panel is currently intercepting the
    right mouse button.

    >
    >>>> In the case of Gnome the window will inherit the position in the screen; if
    >>>> one wants to adjust the window visually it must be visible. I don't know
    >>>> KDE's behavior in this area but suspect it's vaguely similar.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Is
    >>>>> there a way to do this with most virtual desktop
    >>>>> solutions... on OS X or Linux? Just curious as to what
    >>>>> solution other similar systems have for this. I know you
    >>>>> can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move items
    >>>>> from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can
    >>>>> select multiple items at once.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Most X window managers operate on only one window or window
    >>>> group at a time, and the window group is application-identified,
    >>>> not user-identified, as I've stated above.
    >>>>
    >>>> Followups to COLA exclusively.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
    >



    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C++ Programming Idea #8830129:
    std::set<...> v; for(..:iterator i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); i++)
    if(*i == thing) {...}

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  7. Re: Spaces question

    "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    9h3505-kvq.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 8:27 PM:

    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >
    > wrote
    > on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 17:57:33 -0700
    > :
    >> "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    >> 0bm405-63p.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 4:41 PM:
    >>
    >>>>>> If you have an application with several windows open
    >>>>>> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >>>>>> application to move to another space?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Define "space", "window set", and "application".
    >>>>
    >>>> Space: a virtual desktop
    >>>> Window set: I did not use that term... not sure what you mean
    >>>
    >>> Window set: a set of windows. I for one would think
    >>> that fairly obvious, though I'm not sure how to properly
    >>> identify a set of windows to the window manager. The
    >>> best one might do is select a series of list entries or
    >>> icons -- and that's not all that intuitive.

    >>
    >> I would hope we could stick to the topic: can an
    >> virtual desktop solution you know of move all windows
    >> from an application from one space to another?

    >
    > Not at the present time. The main issues, however,
    > involve specification of the windows.


    If you have to get that caught up in how you specify windows and groups and
    whatnot then the answer, clearly, is no.

    >> Not sure where you are going.
    >>
    >>>> Application: a program... as generally used in a GUI environment
    >>>
    >>> Applications get a little complicated.

    >>
    >> Nope, at least not generally and as applies to the
    >> question I am asking.

    >
    >> If you have 6 windows open from, say, Firefox, can you
    >> move them all at the same time.

    >
    > No. This is a major deficiency in X/Gnome, but it's easily
    > fixable; the main problem is that the window manager needs
    > to be able to readily identify those windows that need to
    > be moved.
    >
    > There are also issues if Firefox windows are scattered
    > over different workspaces. Presumably, there are two
    > workcases here:
    >
    > - move all windows of the given application that are
    > on the current workspace to another workspace
    > - move all windows of the given application (regardless
    > of current workspace) to another workspace
    >
    > I would assume the first is what one wants, though the
    > second is easier to program. Neither is possible as
    > of right now.


    OK - that is what I suspected. Thanks. That, really, is what I wanted to
    know.


    --
    Dear Aunt, let's set so double the killer delete select all

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...21217782777472


  8. Re: Spaces question

    "graeme" stated in post
    pan.2007.11.06.03.48.38@no.spam.wanted on 11/5/07 10:00 PM:

    > On Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700, Snit wrote:
    > (NGs to cola)
    >> If you have an application with several windows open is there any way to
    >> easily get all windows from that application to move to another space?
    >> Is there a way to do this with most virtual desktop solutions... on OS X
    >> or Linux? Just curious as to what solution other similar systems have
    >> for this. I know you can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to
    >> move items from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can select
    >> multiple items at once.

    >
    > Devil's Pie: (another Beastie name, nothing to do with function)
    >
    > http://www.burtonini.com/blog/computers/devilspie
    >
    > You write rulesets to shift already created / to be created windows.


    So it seems you can sorta fake it... but if you are going to go through that
    much trouble you might as well just move the windows manually.


    --
    One who makes no mistakes, never makes anything.


  9. Re: Spaces question

    On Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700, Snit wrote:
    (NGs to cola)
    > If you have an application with several windows open is there any way to
    > easily get all windows from that application to move to another space?
    > Is there a way to do this with most virtual desktop solutions... on OS X
    > or Linux? Just curious as to what solution other similar systems have
    > for this. I know you can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to
    > move items from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can select
    > multiple items at once.


    Devil's Pie: (another Beastie name, nothing to do with function)

    http://www.burtonini.com/blog/computers/devilspie

    You write rulesets to shift already created / to be created windows.

  10. Re: Spaces question

    On Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700, Snit wrote:

    > If you have an application with several windows open is there any way to
    > easily get all windows from that application to move to another space? Is
    > there a way to do this with most virtual desktop solutions... on OS X or
    > Linux? Just curious as to what solution other similar systems have for
    > this. I know you can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move
    > items from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can select multiple
    > items at once.


    With KDE you can configure the task bar so that similar tasks are grouped
    together. All windows of an app show up as a single entry on the task
    bar. You can then right click on the task bar entry for the app and click
    on "All to Desktop" and select which desktop you want. I don't know if
    Gnome has a similar function.

    Bug


  11. Re: Spaces question

    "bugbuster" stated in post
    pan.2007.11.06.14.37.44.579352@nowhere.org on 11/6/07 7:37 AM:

    > On Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700, Snit wrote:
    >
    >> If you have an application with several windows open is there any way to
    >> easily get all windows from that application to move to another space? Is
    >> there a way to do this with most virtual desktop solutions... on OS X or
    >> Linux? Just curious as to what solution other similar systems have for
    >> this. I know you can, on many systems, use a contextual menu to move
    >> items from one desktop to another, but not sure if you can select multiple
    >> items at once.

    >
    > With KDE you can configure the task bar so that similar tasks are grouped
    > together. All windows of an app show up as a single entry on the task
    > bar. You can then right click on the task bar entry for the app and click
    > on "All to Desktop" and select which desktop you want. I don't know if
    > Gnome has a similar function.


    Thanks... what does it consider "similar tasks"? Tasks from the same
    application?



    --
    Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value.
    --Albert Einstein


  12. Re: Spaces question

    "The Ghost In The Machine" stated in post
    e5g405-gun.ln1@sirius.tg00suus7038.net on 11/5/07 2:56 PM:

    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Snit
    >
    > wrote
    > on Mon, 05 Nov 2007 13:44:25 -0700
    > :
    >> If you have an application with several windows open
    >> is there any way to easily get all windows from that
    >> application to move to another space?

    >
    > Define "space", "window set", and "application". There is
    > a protocol in X (it's a property tag; I'd have to look up
    > the details) which allows an application to identify related
    > windows, so that a window manager can see them as a group
    > later, but I don't think it's used that often, and some
    > window managers might simply ignore it for all I know.


    What I was looking for OS X does with Spaces!

    -----
    In Spaces view mode (F8), you can move all windows of an
    application together (from one space) to another space by
    dragging them with Control key or Shift key held down.
    -----

    Excellent - though it does not make up for the fact that with Spaces on
    applications "suck" you to another Space all too often.

    --
    When I'm working on a problem, I never think about beauty. I think only how
    to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not
    beautiful, I know it is wrong. -- R. Buckminster Fuller


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