Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned - Linux ; [H]omer espoused: > Undercover video: Why Apple only takes credit cards for iPhones & the > legal questions raised: > > .---- >| Earlier this week, in a post headlined Apple, hackenomics, and >| the waning anonymity (and obsoletion) of ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned

  1. Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned

    [H]omer espoused:
    > Undercover video: Why Apple only takes credit cards for iPhones & the
    > legal questions raised:
    >
    > .----
    >| Earlier this week, in a post headlined Apple, hackenomics, and
    >| the waning anonymity (and obsoletion) of cash, I warned of how
    >| Apple's practice of requiring credit cards to purchase iPhones
    >| wreaks of a future where our cash is no good and our privacy is
    >| sacrificed as a result of dealing in the far more trackable (and
    >| far less anonymous than cash) currency of plastic (credit cards,
    >| debit cards). As I reported in that first piece, Apple hasn't been
    >| very forthcoming about its reasons for requiring a credit card to
    >| purchase an iPhone. So, I came up with a list of my own
    >| possibilities, all but one of which were big brother-esque in
    >| nature.
    > `----
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/Berlind/?p=873
    >
    >
    > "You'll see why 1984 won't be like Nineteen Eighty-Four."
    >
    > http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=OYecfV3ubP8
    >
    > No, but apparent 2007 is, thanks to Apple.
    >


    We're already there. I was in discussion with a fellow governor
    yesterday who told me of her brother's recent attemped visit to the US.

    He arrived at JFK airport, and was held for 8 hours, before being sent
    home. Why? Well, apparently, he had some minor criminal conviction
    dating back to when he was 17 years old. He's now a finance director of
    a major company, and was trying to do his job.

    What I truly don't grasp is why our government is handing over such data
    to the yanks at all? They have no data protection laws there, so that
    information quite simply should not be available to them. At least, not
    until they start enacting *some* laws which give some power to the people,
    to challenge their government - presently, there is no way of
    challenging the government there.

    Furthermore, why is a spent conviction from decades ago even being held
    here, let alone exported to a country rife with data mismanagement?

    Unfortunately, as the chap is a senior character, I very much doubt
    he'll be in a position to fight this out without further damaging his
    position.

    Why on earth are we linking teenage misdemeanors with "terrorism"?

    --
    | Mark Kent -- mark at ellandroad dot demon dot co dot uk |
    | Cola faq: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/ |
    | Cola trolls: http://colatrolls.blogspot.com/ |
    | My (new) blog: http://www.thereisnomagic.org |

  2. Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned


    "Mark Kent" wrote in message
    news80uv4-ape.ln1@ellandroad.demon.co.uk...
    > [H]omer espoused:
    >> Undercover video: Why Apple only takes credit cards for iPhones & the
    >> legal questions raised:
    >>
    >> .----
    >>| Earlier this week, in a post headlined Apple, hackenomics, and
    >>| the waning anonymity (and obsoletion) of cash, I warned of how
    >>| Apple's practice of requiring credit cards to purchase iPhones
    >>| wreaks of a future where our cash is no good and our privacy is
    >>| sacrificed as a result of dealing in the far more trackable (and
    >>| far less anonymous than cash) currency of plastic (credit cards,
    >>| debit cards). As I reported in that first piece, Apple hasn't been
    >>| very forthcoming about its reasons for requiring a credit card to
    >>| purchase an iPhone. So, I came up with a list of my own
    >>| possibilities, all but one of which were big brother-esque in
    >>| nature.
    >> `----
    >>
    >> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Berlind/?p=873



    Another "Duh" for [M]oron. The only reason Apple requires credit-cards to
    buy the iPhone is because there is such overwhelming demand for the iPhone
    so they set a limit of 2-iPhones a person until they can catch up with
    demand. If people are paying with "cash" then there's no way to enforce
    this is there. With credit cards it can be enforced.

    But hey... don't let reality get in the way of your grand conspiracy
    theories.




    >> "You'll see why 1984 won't be like Nineteen Eighty-Four."
    >>
    >> http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=OYecfV3ubP8
    >>
    >> No, but apparent 2007 is, thanks to Apple.
    >>

    >
    > We're already there. I was in discussion with a fellow governor
    > yesterday who told me of her brother's recent attemped visit to the US.
    >
    > He arrived at JFK airport, and was held for 8 hours, before being sent
    > home. Why? Well, apparently, he had some minor criminal conviction
    > dating back to when he was 17 years old. He's now a finance director of
    > a major company, and was trying to do his job.


    We don't want child molesting scum in this country. So how is your "friend"
    doing? Why is it not a surprise that this child molesting criminal is your
    friend.


    > What I truly don't grasp is why our government is handing over such data
    > to the yanks at all? They have no data protection laws there, so that
    > information quite simply should not be available to them. At least, not
    > until they start enacting *some* laws which give some power to the
    > people,
    > to challenge their government - presently, there is no way of
    > challenging the government there.


    The data is being handed over because we have higher standards over here
    regarding who we allow into this country. You and your fellow child
    molesting friends can remain in the dark gloomy wasteland known as the UK.
    Do let us know when dentistry or good dining makes it's first appearance
    over there.


    > Furthermore, why is a spent conviction from decades ago even being held
    > here, let alone exported to a country rife with data mismanagement?


    So your friend has been a child molesting felon for decades.


    > Unfortunately, as the chap is a senior character, I very much doubt
    > he'll be in a position to fight this out without further damaging his
    > position.


    I see. If his employer learned of his feloneous past he would certainly
    lose his jobs. Apparently his employer has higher standards than you. He
    most likely works for an American company.


    > Why on earth are we linking teenage misdemeanors with "terrorism"?


    Once a child molester always a child molester.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  3. Re: [News] [Rival] Apple becomes the "Big Brother" it once condemned

    On Sat, 3 Nov 2007 10:48:25 +0000, Mark Kent wrote:

    > Why on earth are we linking teenage misdemeanors with "terrorism"?


    It's not just the US. Canada does the same thing.

    http://industryreport.mountainnews.c.../post_33.shtml

+ Reply to Thread