Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows - Linux

This is a discussion on Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows - Linux ; In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are contained in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386). What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux? Gracias....

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Thread: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

  1. Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are contained
    in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).

    What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    Gracias.



  2. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 23:09:20 GMT, **ExW wrote:
    > In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are contained
    > in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).
    >
    > What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?


    Over 190+ linuxes.
    Please read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    Always provide distribution, release, and if Mandrake, community,
    official, cooker, when posting questions.
    It could help you get better answers.

    On mandrake 2.6.8.1-12mdk, you would look under
    /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/kernel/drivers
    where you would see more directories like
    acpi bluetooth i2c isdn misc pci telephony
    atm cdrom ide md mtd pcmcia usb
    base char ieee1394 media net scsi video
    block cpufreq input message parport serial w1


    or under /sys/module where you would find the directories
    acpi bluetooth i2c isdn misc pci telephony
    atm cdrom ide md mtd pcmcia usb
    base char ieee1394 media net scsi video
    block cpufreq input message parport serial w1

    Depends on exactly you are looking for.

  3. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    In Linux drivers are called modules and are stored
    in /lib/modules/kernel_version directory (and subdirectories)

    When you type modprobe module_name, modprobe is looking for a module in this
    directory and loading it into memory.

    Additionally some modules are also stored in /boot/initrd file. This file
    includes all modules used to boot up system (for example ide disk driver,
    file system driver, etc)

  4. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows


    "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    news:47d4i2-g3n.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    > In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    >> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are
    >> contained
    >> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).

    >
    >> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    >
    > Don't think you can even remotely compare this to the Linux
    > dynamic loadable module concept. Care to show me how to change the
    > module while remotely connected for the nic your connection is
    > going through, without reconnect?
    >
    > To answer your question, 'modprobe -l' should do.


    ssh remote-host
    ( /etc/init.d/network stop; rmmod mod-1; modprobe mod-2;
    /etc/init.d/network restart ) >/dev/null /dev/null

    The difficulty is getting the necessary changes into the system without
    closing your SSH connection, and pre-scripting all the necessary changes to
    happen correctly the first time. For example, I didn't include the changes
    to your modprobe.conf or disabling the old module if you want to use the
    module with the same name.

    This sort of thing is why a remote serial console or network KVM to a system
    is so amazingly useful for servers in remote data centers.



  5. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    In comp.os.linux.setup Nico Kadel-Garcia :

    > "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    > news:47d4i2-g3n.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    >> In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    >>> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are
    >>> contained
    >>> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).

    >>
    >>> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    >>
    >> Don't think you can even remotely compare this to the Linux
    >> dynamic loadable module concept. Care to show me how to change the
    >> module while remotely connected for the nic your connection is
    >> going through, without reconnect?
    >>
    >> To answer your question, 'modprobe -l' should do.


    > ssh remote-host
    > ( /etc/init.d/network stop; rmmod mod-1; modprobe mod-2;
    > /etc/init.d/network restart ) >/dev/null /dev/null


    And that works in doze? ;-)

    > The difficulty is getting the necessary changes into the system without
    > closing your SSH connection, and pre-scripting all the necessary changes to
    > happen correctly the first time. For example, I didn't include the changes
    > to your modprobe.conf or disabling the old module if you want to use the
    > module with the same name.


    Yep + "depmod -a", funny have used more or less your command-line
    from an interactive ssh login dozens of times with no problems,
    beside the one made a typo in modules.conf...

    > This sort of thing is why a remote serial console or network KVM to a system
    > is so amazingly useful for servers in remote data centers.


    Full ack, prefer serial console. But if you can make some change
    like the above via ssh, why not?

    --
    Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
    mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
    #bofh excuse 183: filesystem not big enough for Jumbo Kernel
    Patch

  6. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows


    "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    news:40l5i2-tsq.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    > In comp.os.linux.setup Nico Kadel-Garcia :
    >
    >> "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    >> news:47d4i2-g3n.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    >>> In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    >>>> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are
    >>>> contained
    >>>> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).
    >>>
    >>>> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?
    >>>
    >>> Don't think you can even remotely compare this to the Linux
    >>> dynamic loadable module concept. Care to show me how to change the
    >>> module while remotely connected for the nic your connection is
    >>> going through, without reconnect?
    >>>
    >>> To answer your question, 'modprobe -l' should do.

    >
    >> ssh remote-host
    >> ( /etc/init.d/network stop; rmmod mod-1; modprobe mod-2;
    >> /etc/init.d/network restart ) >/dev/null /dev/null

    >
    > And that works in doze? ;-)


    Heh. No, changing system drivers in 'doze is even more adventuresome. A
    remote KVM is my hand for playing with the network settings there, or a
    spare network port with a different model of network card and VNC. (I've
    used that, for both Linux and Windows.)

    >> The difficulty is getting the necessary changes into the system without
    >> closing your SSH connection, and pre-scripting all the necessary changes
    >> to
    >> happen correctly the first time. For example, I didn't include the
    >> changes
    >> to your modprobe.conf or disabling the old module if you want to use the
    >> module with the same name.

    >
    > Yep + "depmod -a", funny have used more or less your command-line
    > from an interactive ssh login dozens of times with no problems,
    > beside the one made a typo in modules.conf...
    >
    >> This sort of thing is why a remote serial console or network KVM to a
    >> system
    >> is so amazingly useful for servers in remote data centers.

    >
    > Full ack, prefer serial console. But if you can make some change
    > like the above via ssh, why not?


    Because sometimes you make typos, and when it's an absolutely critical
    server, having a fall back position can save your job.



  7. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    I thought that as a monolithic kernel, linux has the drivers in the
    kernel. I happen to know that they get compiled in the kernel and you
    can get the source at kernels.org .
    Just a though, Poly-p man


  8. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    "=?iso-8859-1?B?/vOh/y3e9SH9IG1A8Q==?=" writes:

    >I thought that as a monolithic kernel, linux has the drivers in the
    >kernel. I happen to know that they get compiled in the kernel and you
    >can get the source at kernels.org .


    No, Linux's equivalent to the driver dll are the modules. Many drivers are
    compiled as modules so you can keep the kernel smaller.
    They are loaded via the program modprobe.

    But yes the source is part of the kernel.


  9. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    Why do you always make an issue with a SIMPLE question? See the other
    responses...plain and simple. Always making things about winodws versus
    Linux...shut the hell up!



    "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    news:47d4i2-g3n.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    > In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    >> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are
    >> contained
    >> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).

    >
    >> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    >
    > Don't think you can even remotely compare this to the Linux
    > dynamic loadable module concept. Care to show me how to change the
    > module while remotely connected for the nic your connection is
    > going through, without reconnect?
    >
    > To answer your question, 'modprobe -l' should do.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
    > mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
    > #bofh excuse 8: static buildup




  10. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    Bill Marcum wrote:

    > ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.]
    > On 4 Apr 2005 18:08:39 -0700, -! m@
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I thought that as a monolithic kernel, linux has the drivers in the
    >>kernel. I happen to know that they get compiled in the kernel and you
    >>can get the source at kernels.org .
    >>Just a though, Poly-p man
    >>

    >
    > You can choose to compile drivers into the kernel or compile them as
    > modules.


    While generally people used to compile drivers right into the kernel
    because it was faster, the modules work very well and you don't have
    those problems (as much) anymore.

  11. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    [ Followup-To --> comp.os.linux.setup ]

    In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    > "Michael Heiming" wrote in message
    > news:47d4i2-g3n.ln1@news.heiming.de...
    >> In comp.os.linux.setup **ExW :
    >>> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are
    >>> contained
    >>> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).

    >>
    >>> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    >>
    >> Don't think you can even remotely compare this to the Linux
    >> dynamic loadable module concept. Care to show me how to change the
    >> module while remotely connected for the nic your connection is
    >> going through, without reconnect?
    >>
    >> To answer your question, 'modprobe -l' should do.


    > Why do you always make an issue with a SIMPLE question? See the other
    > responses...plain and simple. Always making things about winodws versus
    > Linux...shut the hell up!


    Didn't made an issue out of anything, just pointing out the facts
    in addition to answering your question, if you can't live with
    reality, feel free to kill-file me or stop posting to public ngs,
    plain and simple.

    --
    Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
    mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
    #bofh excuse 460: Here's a nickel, kid. Get yourself a better
    computer.

  12. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 05:16:19 +0000, **ExW wrote:

    > Why do you always make an issue with a SIMPLE question? See the other
    > responses...plain and simple. Always making things about winodws versus
    > Linux...shut the hell up!


    Your question compared Linux to Windows, and there wasn't anything in Mr.
    Heiming's response that wasn't reasonable. You can't compare DLLs to
    loadable modules. Things that are different aren't the same.

    Nice of you to tell people to shut up when they answer your questions.

    --
    Life is short, but wide. -KV


  13. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 17:23:28 -0600, Bit Twister wrote:

    > On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 23:09:20 GMT, **ExW wrote:
    >> In Windows XP or Windows 2000, the built in drivers for the OS are contained
    >> in the file called DRIVERS.CAB (%WINDIR%\Driver Cache\i386).
    >>
    >> What and where is the equivalent to this in Linux?

    >
    > Over 190+ linuxes.


    Actually, according to www.distrowatch.com, there are over 390 Linux
    distributions.

    > Please read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    > Always provide distribution, release, and if Mandrake, community,
    > official, cooker, when posting questions.
    > It could help you get better answers.
    >
    > On mandrake 2.6.8.1-12mdk, you would look under
    > /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/kernel/drivers
    > where you would see more directories like
    > acpi bluetooth i2c isdn misc pci telephony
    > atm cdrom ide md mtd pcmcia usb
    > base char ieee1394 media net scsi video
    > block cpufreq input message parport serial w1
    >
    >
    > or under /sys/module where you would find the directories
    > acpi bluetooth i2c isdn misc pci telephony
    > atm cdrom ide md mtd pcmcia usb
    > base char ieee1394 media net scsi video
    > block cpufreq input message parport serial w1
    >
    > Depends on exactly you are looking for.


    There are also a number of drivers which end up compiled into the kernel.

    The best way to answer the original question is that there is not a direct
    correspondence.


  14. Re: Drivers for Linux - compared to Windows

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 05:16:19 +0000, **ExW wrote:

    > Why do you always make an issue with a SIMPLE question? See the other
    > responses...plain and simple. Always making things about winodws versus
    > Linux...shut the hell up!
    >
    >


    Everyone has a frame of reference - what is your problem?


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