Re: Free (as in Freedom) Music Bad News to RIAA; MSNBC Sought 'Piracy Tax' - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: Free (as in Freedom) Music Bad News to RIAA; MSNBC Sought 'Piracy Tax' - Linux ; On Oct 30, 9:07 pm, "[H]omer" wrote: > Verily I say unto thee, that Roy Schestowitz spake thusly: > > It's time for the RIAA to the face the music > > > ,----[ Quote ] > > | Saul ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Re: Free (as in Freedom) Music Bad News to RIAA; MSNBC Sought 'Piracy Tax'

  1. Re: Free (as in Freedom) Music Bad News to RIAA; MSNBC Sought 'Piracy Tax'

    On Oct 30, 9:07 pm, "[H]omer" wrote:
    > Verily I say unto thee, that Roy Schestowitz spake thusly:
    > > It's time for the RIAA to the face the music

    >
    > > ,----[ Quote ]
    > > | Saul Williams

    > Never heard of him.


    I knew a guy named Eric Schmidt in 1992, but not the same guy who
    formed Google.
    There are even some corporate leaders you STILL don't know, because
    they let the company speak for them. The CEO is the "mouth" for a
    much larger organization, most of whom are anonymous.

    > Still, it's great that he's adopting the new music distribution paradigm
    > (whoever he is), as I think most artists will eventually do.


    I think we will see a pattern similar to what has happened with the
    written word. We have the big name publisher, and they still maintain
    $billion companies with huge revenues. We have the freebie usenet
    posters who don't get paid to write but just do it because they enjoy
    it, and you get the Bloggers and electronic columnists who establish
    their own identities and collect enough revenue from their sites to
    fund their efforts.

    We'll probably see a similar pattern in music and video. We'll see
    the big networks and studios offering content that they would never
    show on network television, but can easily make available via
    download. Imagine every show recorded on NBC since 1950. Every
    Johnny Carson show, every old movie, every sports event, and every old
    television series, even every episode of Ed Sullivan or Ted Mack
    Amateur Hour, or Sing Along with Mitch.

    If you figure 16 hours/day 365 days /year for 50 years, that would be
    292,000 hours of television. With compression, NTSC resolution, and
    optimal storage, you could get 1 gigabyte per hour, which means you
    would only need 292 terabytes of storage in a SATA SAN array. Of
    course, if you factor in re-runs, commercials, and live shows, the
    number drops to about 100,000 gigabytes of storage or 100 terabytes.
    These days 1 terabyte of SATA storage runs about $300. Even hot-
    pluggable RAID 5 SATA would only be about $1000 per terabyte, which
    means that NBC could store all 50 years for less than $100,000. Those
    could be cached into faster SAN storage that can be piped to the cable
    boxes.

    I can easily imagine that many elderly people would love to subscribe
    to such a service. They would love being able to watch old favorites
    of 40-50 years ago. For many, it would be worth paying an extra
    $30-50 per month, as well as upgrading to high speed internet.

    The question is whether I would want to download it and view it on my
    PC, or into a cable box with DVR using a web browser on the cable box
    to select the programs I wanted to download and view.

    > K.http://slated.org


    > Fedora release 7 (Moonshine) on sky, running kernel 2.6.22.1-41.fc7
    > 01:05:34 up 83 days, 1:00, 3 users, load average: 0.10, 0.19, 0.16


    Homer, how do you like Fedora Release 7? I haven't tried it yet, but
    I've been curious.
    Maybe you could post your experiences in a new topic?

    Rex


  2. Rex Ballard: citations please ..

    Rex Ballard wrote:

    Citations please for these statements of yours ...

    http://groups.google.co.uk/group/com...d44043ede488d8

+ Reply to Thread