FYI: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads... - Linux

This is a discussion on FYI: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads... - Linux ; (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115 ) AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter NEW YORK (AP) -- To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible. An AP reporter attempted to download, ...

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  1. FYI: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115)

    AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter



    NEW YORK (AP) -- To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking
    some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible.

    An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent,
    a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and
    San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through
    Comcast cable modems.

    We picked the Bible for the test because it's not protected by copyright and
    the file is a convenient size.

    In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked. In the third, the
    transfer started only after a 10-minute delay. When we tried to upload files
    that were in demand by a wider number of BitTorrent users, those connections
    were also blocked.

    Not all Comcast-connected computers appear to be affected, however. In a
    test with a third Comcast-connected computer in the Boston area, we were
    unable to test with the Bible, apparently due to an unrelated error. When we
    attempted to upload a more widely disseminated file, there was no evidence
    of blocking.

    The Bible test was conducted with three other Internet connections. One was
    provided by Time Warner Inc.'s Time Warner Cable, and the other came from
    Cablevision Systems Corp. The third was the business-class connection to the
    AP's headquarters.

    No signs of interference with file-sharing were detected in those tests.

    Further analysis of the transfer attempt from the Comcast-connected computer
    in the San Francisco area revealed that the failure was due to "reset"
    packets that the two computers received, carrying the return address of the
    other computer.

    Those packets tell the receiving computer to stop communicating with the
    sender. However, the traffic analyzer software running on each computer
    showed that neither computer actually sent the packets. That means they
    originated somewhere in between, with faked return addresses.

    In tests analyzing the traffic received by a computer on Time Warner Cable
    that was trying to download a file from a large "swarm" of BitTorrent users,
    more than half of the reset packets received carried the return addresses of
    Comcast subscribers, even though Comcast's 12.4 million residential
    customers make up only about 20 percent of U.S. broadband subscribers. It
    was the only U.S. Internet service provider whose subscribers consistently
    appeared to send reset packets (which are occasionally generated
    legitimately).

    Comcast subscriber Robb Topolski, who discovered the blocking earlier this
    year and traced it to reset packets, pointed out that a Canadian company
    called Sandvine Inc. sells equipment that promises to save bandwidth for
    Internet service providers by managing and redirecting file-sharing traffic.

    BitTorrent Inc. President Ashwin Navin said that the interference method on
    Comcast's network is consistent with Sandvine's technology. Sandvine did not
    respond to a request for comment.

    Comcast spokesman Charlie Douglas would not confirm that the company uses
    Sandvine equipment.

    "We rarely disclose our vendors or our processes for operating our network
    for competitive reasons and to protect against network abuse," he said.



    (Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)





  2. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the Bible
    to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?

    Stealing is stealing!

    "jim" wrote in message
    news:c6MSi.2995$b9.923@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    > (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115)
    >
    > AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter
    >
    >
    >
    > NEW YORK (AP) -- To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking
    > some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the
    > Bible.
    >
    > An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program
    > BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the
    > Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the
    > Internet through Comcast cable modems.
    >
    > We picked the Bible for the test because it's not protected by copyright
    > and the file is a convenient size.
    >
    > In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked. In the third, the
    > transfer started only after a 10-minute delay. When we tried to upload
    > files that were in demand by a wider number of BitTorrent users, those
    > connections were also blocked.
    >
    > Not all Comcast-connected computers appear to be affected, however. In a
    > test with a third Comcast-connected computer in the Boston area, we were
    > unable to test with the Bible, apparently due to an unrelated error. When
    > we attempted to upload a more widely disseminated file, there was no
    > evidence of blocking.
    >
    > The Bible test was conducted with three other Internet connections. One
    > was provided by Time Warner Inc.'s Time Warner Cable, and the other came
    > from Cablevision Systems Corp. The third was the business-class connection
    > to the AP's headquarters.
    >
    > No signs of interference with file-sharing were detected in those tests.
    >
    > Further analysis of the transfer attempt from the Comcast-connected
    > computer in the San Francisco area revealed that the failure was due to
    > "reset" packets that the two computers received, carrying the return
    > address of the other computer.
    >
    > Those packets tell the receiving computer to stop communicating with the
    > sender. However, the traffic analyzer software running on each computer
    > showed that neither computer actually sent the packets. That means they
    > originated somewhere in between, with faked return addresses.
    >
    > In tests analyzing the traffic received by a computer on Time Warner Cable
    > that was trying to download a file from a large "swarm" of BitTorrent
    > users, more than half of the reset packets received carried the return
    > addresses of Comcast subscribers, even though Comcast's 12.4 million
    > residential customers make up only about 20 percent of U.S. broadband
    > subscribers. It was the only U.S. Internet service provider whose
    > subscribers consistently appeared to send reset packets (which are
    > occasionally generated legitimately).
    >
    > Comcast subscriber Robb Topolski, who discovered the blocking earlier this
    > year and traced it to reset packets, pointed out that a Canadian company
    > called Sandvine Inc. sells equipment that promises to save bandwidth for
    > Internet service providers by managing and redirecting file-sharing
    > traffic.
    >
    > BitTorrent Inc. President Ashwin Navin said that the interference method
    > on Comcast's network is consistent with Sandvine's technology. Sandvine
    > did not respond to a request for comment.
    >
    > Comcast spokesman Charlie Douglas would not confirm that the company uses
    > Sandvine equipment.
    >
    > "We rarely disclose our vendors or our processes for operating our network
    > for competitive reasons and to protect against network abuse," he said.
    >
    >
    >
    > (Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    >
    >
    >
    >




  3. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    On Oct 21, 1:43 pm, "Robin" wrote:
    > How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the Bible
    > to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?


    Jesus' copyright is good only for the red words.


  4. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    "jim" wrote in message
    news:c6MSi.2995$b9.923@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    > (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115)
    >
    > AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter
    >
    > ... An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program
    > BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible
    > ...
    > We picked the Bible for the test because it's not protected by
    > copyright and the file is a convenient size.
    > ...


    Another possible reason for choosing the KJV Bible is because it makes
    a good headline:

    "Comcast blocks users from reading Bible!"


    --
    Chris Cowles
    Gainesville, FL



  5. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 15:08:17 -0400, Chris Cowles wrote:

    > "jim" wrote in message
    > news:c6MSi.2995$b9.923@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    >> (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115)
    >>
    >> AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter
    >>
    >> ... An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program
    >> BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible ...
    >> We picked the Bible for the test because it's not protected by
    >> copyright and the file is a convenient size. ...

    >
    > Another possible reason for choosing the KJV Bible is because it makes a
    > good headline:
    >
    > "Comcast blocks users from reading Bible!"
    >
    >


    While this is bad, one can go to a site like Biblegateway and read it the
    intarweb. Try even just reading a bible online in Saudi Arabia. They'll
    probably throw you in jail and flog you.

  6. Re: FYI: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    In article , jim@home.net
    says...
    > An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent,
    > a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and
    > San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through
    > Comcast cable modems.


    Now if we could just get AOL users and COMCAST users blocked completely


    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)

  7. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    Comcast$ astroturfer Robin wrote on behalf of Comcast$:

    > How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the
    > Bible to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?
    >
    > Stealing is stealing!


    Jesus shares his bible and doesn't call it stealing.
    Its called spreading of the word.

    Only heathens worshipping the devil call it stealing.
    Only heathens listen to devils and astroturf on behalf of Comcast$
    management pretending it all to be otherwise for the
    sake of 30 pieces of silver.



  8. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    Robin wrote:
    > How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the Bible
    > to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?
    >
    > Stealing is stealing!
    >
    > "jim" wrote in message
    > news:c6MSi.2995$b9.923@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    >> (from http://www.11alive.com/tech/article_...storyid=105115)
    >>
    >> AP Tests Comcast's File-Sharing Filter
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> NEW YORK (AP) -- To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking
    >> some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the
    >> Bible.
    >>
    >> An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program
    >> BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the
    >> Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the
    >> Internet through Comcast cable modems.
    >>
    >> We picked the Bible for the test because it's not protected by copyright
    >> and the file is a convenient size.
    >>
    >> In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked. In the third, the
    >> transfer started only after a 10-minute delay. When we tried to upload
    >> files that were in demand by a wider number of BitTorrent users, those
    >> connections were also blocked.
    >>
    >> Not all Comcast-connected computers appear to be affected, however. In a
    >> test with a third Comcast-connected computer in the Boston area, we were
    >> unable to test with the Bible, apparently due to an unrelated error. When
    >> we attempted to upload a more widely disseminated file, there was no
    >> evidence of blocking.
    >>
    >> The Bible test was conducted with three other Internet connections. One
    >> was provided by Time Warner Inc.'s Time Warner Cable, and the other came
    >> from Cablevision Systems Corp. The third was the business-class connection
    >> to the AP's headquarters.
    >>
    >> No signs of interference with file-sharing were detected in those tests.
    >>
    >> Further analysis of the transfer attempt from the Comcast-connected
    >> computer in the San Francisco area revealed that the failure was due to
    >> "reset" packets that the two computers received, carrying the return
    >> address of the other computer.
    >>
    >> Those packets tell the receiving computer to stop communicating with the
    >> sender. However, the traffic analyzer software running on each computer
    >> showed that neither computer actually sent the packets. That means they
    >> originated somewhere in between, with faked return addresses.
    >>
    >> In tests analyzing the traffic received by a computer on Time Warner Cable
    >> that was trying to download a file from a large "swarm" of BitTorrent
    >> users, more than half of the reset packets received carried the return
    >> addresses of Comcast subscribers, even though Comcast's 12.4 million
    >> residential customers make up only about 20 percent of U.S. broadband
    >> subscribers. It was the only U.S. Internet service provider whose
    >> subscribers consistently appeared to send reset packets (which are
    >> occasionally generated legitimately).
    >>
    >> Comcast subscriber Robb Topolski, who discovered the blocking earlier this
    >> year and traced it to reset packets, pointed out that a Canadian company
    >> called Sandvine Inc. sells equipment that promises to save bandwidth for
    >> Internet service providers by managing and redirecting file-sharing
    >> traffic.
    >>
    >> BitTorrent Inc. President Ashwin Navin said that the interference method
    >> on Comcast's network is consistent with Sandvine's technology. Sandvine
    >> did not respond to a request for comment.
    >>
    >> Comcast spokesman Charlie Douglas would not confirm that the company uses
    >> Sandvine equipment.
    >>
    >> "We rarely disclose our vendors or our processes for operating our network
    >> for competitive reasons and to protect against network abuse," he said.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> (Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >



    FYI, the KJV text is pretty much like public domain, which is why it's
    included in so many free Bible programs. It is not copyrighted with
    royalties like other versions of the Bible. I think KJV Bible makers
    can copyright their additions (study helps) to it as a derived work,
    which is why you may see copyrights in theirs.

    --

    ------------------------------------
    Jim Michaels
    for email, edit the address

    "Because we do not understand the brain very well we are constantly
    tempted to use the latest technology as a model for trying to understand
    it. In my childhood we were always assured that the brain was a
    telephone switchboard. ('What else could it be?') I was amused to see
    that Sherrington, the great British neuroscientist, thought that the
    brain worked like a telegraph system. Freud often compared the brain to
    hydraulic and electro-magnetic systems. Leibniz compared it to a mill,
    and I am told some of the ancient Greeks thought the brain functions
    like a catapult. At present, obviously, the metaphor is the digital
    computer." - John R Searls.

  9. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    On Oct 21, 11:15 pm, 7 wrote:
    > Comcast$ astroturfer Robin wrote on behalf of Comcast$:
    >
    > > How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the
    > > Bible to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?

    >
    > > Stealing is stealing!

    >
    > Jesus shares his bible and doesn't call it stealing.
    > Its called spreading of the word.
    >
    > Only heathens worshipping the devil call it stealing.
    > Only heathens listen to devils and astroturf on behalf of Comcast$
    > management pretending it all to be otherwise for the
    > sake of 30 pieces of silver.


    It was a joke, moron.


  10. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...


    "Jim Michaels" wrote in message
    news:eYSdnYQma_De-oHanZ2dnUVZ_uGknZ2d@comcast.com...

    >
    > FYI, the KJV text is pretty much like public domain, which is why it's
    > included in so many free Bible programs. It is not copyrighted with
    > royalties like other versions of the Bible. I think KJV Bible makers can
    > copyright their additions (study helps) to it as a derived work, which is
    > why you may see copyrights in theirs.
    >


    You can't copyright the text of the bible but you can copyright the format
    and any additions you make (like illustrations).
    That is why bibles are copyright but The Bible is not.


  11. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    7 wrote:
    > Comcast$ astroturfer Robin wrote on behalf of Comcast$:
    >
    >> How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow
    >> the Bible to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?
    >>
    >> Stealing is stealing!

    >
    > Jesus shares his bible and doesn't call it stealing.
    > Its called spreading of the word.
    >
    > Only heathens worshipping the devil call it stealing.
    > Only heathens listen to devils and astroturf on behalf of Comcast$
    > management pretending it all to be otherwise for the
    > sake of 30 pieces of silver.


    It is stealing. Almost all Bible translations are copyrighted. But that
    shouldn't stop you.

    For about 300 years, the teaching of Jesus were transmitted orally.* Simply
    memorize the text and you won't have to violate the law. After all, Jesus
    said: "Render unto the copyright holders ..."

    ------
    *The earliest written example of NT text is a bit of parchment about 2"
    square from the Book of John and dated to middle of the third century A.D.



  12. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    dennis@home wrote:
    >
    > You can't copyright the text of the bible but you can copyright the
    > format and any additions you make (like illustrations).
    > That is why bibles are copyright but The Bible is not.


    Assuming you have the original text in Aramaic, Greek, or even Latin, you
    are correct.

    A translation, however, is copyrightable. The following are copyrighted:

    CEV - Contemporary English Version
    ESV - English Standard Version
    GW - God's Word
    GNT - Good News Translation
    HCSB - Holman Christian Standard Bible
    ISV - International Standard Version
    JBP - New Testament in Modern English
    NAB - New American Bible
    NASB - New American Standard Bible
    NCV - New Century Version
    NET - New English Translation
    NIV - New International Version

    and about twenty others. And these just in English.



  13. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...


    "HeyBub" wrote in message
    news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    > dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >> You can't copyright the text of the bible but you can copyright the
    >> format and any additions you make (like illustrations).
    >> That is why bibles are copyright but The Bible is not.

    >
    > Assuming you have the original text in Aramaic, Greek, or even Latin, you
    > are correct.


    The English King James(?) is also copyright free.
    >
    > A translation, however, is copyrightable. The following are copyrighted:
    >
    > CEV - Contemporary English Version
    > ESV - English Standard Version
    > GW - God's Word
    > GNT - Good News Translation
    > HCSB - Holman Christian Standard Bible
    > ISV - International Standard Version
    > JBP - New Testament in Modern English
    > NAB - New American Bible
    > NASB - New American Standard Bible
    > NCV - New Century Version
    > NET - New English Translation
    > NIV - New International Version
    >
    > and about twenty others. And these just in English.
    >
    >


    Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will own
    the copyright and can do what you want.


  14. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:15:09 +0100, "dennis@home"
    wrote:

    >
    >"HeyBub" wrote in message
    >news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    >> dennis@home wrote:


    >Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    >If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will own
    >the copyright and can do what you want.



    You keep babbling about topics you obviously have NO knowledge
    whatsoever on and end up looking very foolish. Is that your goal? Well
    Bubba, you're succeeding.


  15. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...


    "Adam Albright" wrote in message
    news:a5rph3l7ma0dhc2rrk5rou4sb766g2ikjp@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:15:09 +0100, "dennis@home"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"HeyBub" wrote in message
    >>news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    >>> dennis@home wrote:

    >
    >>Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    >>If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will
    >>own
    >>the copyright and can do what you want.

    >
    >
    > You keep babbling about topics you obviously have NO knowledge
    > whatsoever on and end up looking very foolish. Is that your goal? Well
    > Bubba, you're succeeding.
    >


    Hi crazy.
    I see your great expertise in everything allows you to spot the "errors"
    everyone else on the planet makes with such ease.
    It makes me wonder why there are any problems left to be solved when we have
    a great know it all like you to help us.


  16. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    "cc" schreef in bericht
    news:1193048564.689865.277320@e9g2000prf.googlegro ups.com...
    > On Oct 21, 11:15 pm, 7 wrote:
    >> Comcast$ astroturfer Robin wrote on behalf of Comcast$:
    >>
    >> > How do you expect Jesus to collect his royalties if we're to allow the
    >> > Bible to be freely distributed on BitTorrent?

    >>
    >> > Stealing is stealing!

    >>
    >> Jesus shares his bible and doesn't call it stealing.
    >> Its called spreading of the word.
    >>
    >> Only heathens worshipping the devil call it stealing.
    >> Only heathens listen to devils and astroturf on behalf of Comcast$
    >> management pretending it all to be otherwise for the
    >> sake of 30 pieces of silver.

    >
    > It was a joke, moron.
    >

    LMFAO
    "7" , actually *is* the most stoopid poaster on usenet!















  17. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:48:45 +0100, "dennis@home"
    wrote:

    >
    >"Adam Albright" wrote in message
    >news:a5rph3l7ma0dhc2rrk5rou4sb766g2ikjp@4ax.com...
    >> On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:15:09 +0100, "dennis@home"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"HeyBub" wrote in message
    >>>news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    >>>> dennis@home wrote:

    >>
    >>>Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    >>>If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will
    >>>own
    >>>the copyright and can do what you want.

    >>
    >>
    >> You keep babbling about topics you obviously have NO knowledge
    >> whatsoever on and end up looking very foolish. Is that your goal? Well
    >> Bubba, you're succeeding.
    >>

    >
    >Hi crazy.
    >I see your great expertise in everything allows you to spot the "errors"
    >everyone else on the planet makes with such ease.


    Well duh... copyright issues happen to be another topic I do indeed
    have considerable experience with. But since you prefer to pontificate
    rather than learn, you have my permission to make a fool of yourself.
    Again. THAT is something you are obviously are quite capable at as
    you've already demonstrated. Knock yourself out. ;-)


  18. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    dennis@home wrote:

    >
    > "Adam Albright" wrote in message
    > news:a5rph3l7ma0dhc2rrk5rou4sb766g2ikjp@4ax.com...
    >> On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:15:09 +0100, "dennis@home"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"HeyBub" wrote in message
    >>>news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    >>>> dennis@home wrote:

    >>
    >>>Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    >>>If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will
    >>>own
    >>>the copyright and can do what you want.

    >>
    >>
    >> You keep babbling about topics you obviously have NO knowledge
    >> whatsoever on and end up looking very foolish. Is that your goal? Well
    >> Bubba, you're succeeding.
    >>

    >
    > Hi crazy.
    > I see your great expertise in everything allows you to spot the "errors"
    > everyone else on the planet makes with such ease.
    > It makes me wonder why there are any problems left to be solved when we
    > have a great know it all like you to help us.


    You might start to explain how you start to "own the copyright" by writing
    it in RTF instead.

    I am sure this will make for a good laugh again, as all your claims are
    idiotic beyond imagination
    --
    Windows was created to keep stupid people away from UNIX."
    -- Tom Christiansen


  19. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...


    "Adam Albright" wrote in message
    news:cqtph3ls305drls72iv0vvh8jc1dsg64h8@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:48:45 +0100, "dennis@home"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Adam Albright" wrote in message
    >>news:a5rph3l7ma0dhc2rrk5rou4sb766g2ikjp@4ax.com...
    >>> On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:15:09 +0100, "dennis@home"
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>"HeyBub" wrote in message
    >>>>news:eZ3dx6LFIHA.1208@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
    >>>>> dennis@home wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Yes well they have to do something to make them copyright.
    >>>>If you download the King James bible text and format it in RTF you will
    >>>>own
    >>>>the copyright and can do what you want.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You keep babbling about topics you obviously have NO knowledge
    >>> whatsoever on and end up looking very foolish. Is that your goal? Well
    >>> Bubba, you're succeeding.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Hi crazy.
    >>I see your great expertise in everything allows you to spot the "errors"
    >>everyone else on the planet makes with such ease.

    >
    > Well duh... copyright issues happen to be another topic I do indeed
    > have considerable experience with. But since you prefer to pontificate
    > rather than learn, you have my permission to make a fool of yourself.
    > Again. THAT is something you are obviously are quite capable at as
    > you've already demonstrated. Knock yourself out. ;-)
    >


    So when did the copyright on a 1752 bit of text expire then?
    Would that be 1802 or do you think the 100 year rule actually exists?

    Either way the text of The Bible is not copyright and there is nothing you
    can do about it.

    If you want to argue about if a 1998 printed bible that contains that text
    is copyright then find someone else who thinks it isn't to argue with you
    moron.

    As for your knowledge of copyright issues its the same as the rest of your
    knowledge.. only applicable to the imaginary world that you live in.
    It will be ignored just like everything else you suggest.


  20. Re: How Comcast blocks Bible downloads...

    In article ,
    dennis@killspam.kicks-ass.net says...
    > It will be ignored just like everything else you suggest.


    LOL

    Want to make you life easier? I use to see 300-500 messages per day in
    this group, but for the first time in a very LONG time I've implemented
    a kill filter.

    I've setup the following filter:

    Subject contains "Linux"
    Or
    Subject contains "Ubuntu"
    Or
    Body contains "Ubuntu"
    Or
    Body contains "Linux"
    Or
    From contains "Adam Albright"

    Now it's a pleasure to read the group again.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)

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