Observations on the latest Mandriva - Linux

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  1. Observations on the latest Mandriva

    Okay, I said a while back I would do some advocacy on Mandriva's latest
    release. And since it's now Sunday afternoon, I have a little spare time
    in which to do so. It's not going to be an in-depth review or anything,
    just some thoughts and comments. All *sensible* feedback welcome.

    I used to have Mandriva, and before that Mandrake, on most of my
    PCs/laptops. I liked it a lot, and found it easy and pleasant to use,
    ideal for someone not very technically inclined. But the last really
    decent version I had was the 2005 LE distro. After that, it just seemed to
    have lost its way. I gave subequent releases a try, but none of them
    really came up to scratch. Finally, I switched to SUSE as my main distro,
    and left Mandriva behind.

    However, with the latest release being spoken of in glowiing terms, I
    decided to give my old favourite a whirl again. I downloaded the
    MandrivaOne KDE edition (the Gnome version hadn't come out then), and
    booted it up on my trusty old FrankenPC.

    This box is by now means state of the art, a Duron 950MHZ, with 768 MB
    RAM, two hard drives, CD and DVD drves, and a 256 MB nvida graphics card
    with I suspect is a bit too powerful for the mobo. The install went well,
    with partitioning a breeze using Mandriva's easy and straight-forward
    partioning tool - I usually manually partition my drives on this machine,
    with root and home, and a separate data partition on the second drive.
    Installation itself is not as fast as, say, Ubuntu, but quite acceptable.

    I had tested 3D with the live CD but this box, though it should be capable
    of it, has trouble with 3D, which I think is down to hardware (the card),
    as it's common to all the distros I've tried on it. I might just get a
    128 or even 64 meg card to put in it instead. At some point I'd like to
    really try out this new Metisse 3D desktop thing. The rest works fine.

    I quickly decided to install GNOME. I just don't feel at home in KDE any
    more, although I used it more often than I used GNOME back when I was last
    a regular Mandriva user in 2005.

    The new Mandriva is a huge improvement over the old, without losing that
    familiar Mandriva look and feel too much. The new default theme la Ora is
    pleasant, the artwork, as in Fedora, is very much better than it used to
    be.

    I usually go straight to Easyurpmi to set up repos, but I thought I would
    try the new setup Mandriva has put in place for installs and updates.
    These official repos, while pretty comprehensive, don't include things
    like libdvdcss or the win32 codecs, and Mandriva doesn't make it as
    straight-forward for the new user to get them, as, say, Ubuntu now does.
    For a new user, going to Easyurpmi would probably be better, as they can
    add repos like the plf which supply these codecs, etc. I just grabbed up
    the libdvdcss rpm and installed it manually.

    Software installation is easy using the GUI installer, which has been
    vastly improved from the previous version I used (2006). Obviously, the
    choice of software available will depend on what repositories you have
    enabled, but the selection is wide. Much as I love GNOME, I generally
    install Kate for editing because I can't get Gedit to do static word wrap
    (anyone know how to do that? Love to know if there *is* a way).

    Despite this not being by any means a fast PC, the distro works well on
    it, and is not noticeably slow once the desktop has loaded. Since I
    installed using the KDE-based Live CD, most of the apps are KDE, but
    that's not a big problem to me. Both environments are attractive, and the
    la Ora theme helps to blend them together. IMO, the average user may not
    be bothered by these differences in looks anyway. Seamless integration of
    the look and feel of KDE apps in GNOME and vice versa would be desirable,
    but may not be entirely possible in all aspects.

    Would a less experience user be okay with Mandriva? This is a difficult
    question to answer. It's easy to say 'yes', but we need to remember that
    most of us in COLA are familiar with Linux in a way many novices aren't.
    They will of course gain that familiarity in time, but at first, they may
    be all at sea despite the great strides made in desktop usability in Linux.

    Personally, I think Mandriva is one of the most usable distros. I would
    like to see a good book along the lines of Mandriva for Beginners,
    including the latest available release (Linux Format has in the past put
    out special editions of their mag with a distro included and plenty of
    help and instruction for beginners). There are plenty of Ubuntu books and
    several for Red Hat/Fedora, and even one for Mepis, so I see no reasons
    omeone shouldn't do the same for Mandriva. I'd very much like to see this
    distro regain the popularity and respect it once had.

    Would I install it now on my maoin PC? Possibly. What holds me back is not
    the expectation of a poor performance, more that I've got SLED just as I
    want it, and I've grown to like SUSE a lot. But I certainly don't rule it
    out. I'm considering buying a new PC, and I would definitely rate this new
    release worth putting on it. Mandriva has recently streamlined its
    comercial offerings, too. It even has a pre-installed USB key version you
    can buy.

    Overall, I would recommend the latest Mandriva to a Linux newcomer to try,
    particularly if he tries the MandrivaOne live CD, which has non-free
    graphics drivers, and offers compiz-fusion and metisse for those with
    compatible graphics cards.

    It will work quite nicely on less than stellar hardware, and several other
    less intensive window managers are available if required. All in all, a
    very strong contender, and let's hope the trend continues, and that
    Mandriva is over its troubles.

    --
    Kier



  2. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Oct 21, 12:17 pm, Kier wrote:
    > Okay, I said a while back I would do some advocacy on Mandriva's latest
    > release. And since it's now Sunday afternoon, I have a little spare time
    > in which to do so. It's not going to be an in-depth review or anything,
    > just some thoughts and comments. All *sensible* feedback welcome.
    >
    > I used to have Mandriva, and before that Mandrake, on most of my
    > PCs/laptops. I liked it a lot, and found it easy and pleasant to use,
    > ideal for someone not very technically inclined. But the last really
    > decent version I had was the 2005 LE distro. After that, it just seemed to
    > have lost its way. I gave subequent releases a try, but none of them
    > really came up to scratch. Finally, I switched to SUSE as my main distro,
    > and left Mandriva behind.
    >
    > However, with the latest release being spoken of in glowiing terms, I
    > decided to give my old favourite a whirl again. I downloaded the
    > MandrivaOne KDE edition (the Gnome version hadn't come out then), and
    > booted it up on my trusty old FrankenPC.
    >
    > This box is by now means state of the art, a Duron 950MHZ, with 768 MB
    > RAM, two hard drives, CD and DVD drves, and a 256 MB nvida graphics card
    > with I suspect is a bit too powerful for the mobo. The install went well,
    > with partitioning a breeze using Mandriva's easy and straight-forward
    > partioning tool - I usually manually partition my drives on this machine,
    > with root and home, and a separate data partition on the second drive.
    > Installation itself is not as fast as, say, Ubuntu, but quite acceptable.
    >
    > I had tested 3D with the live CD but this box, though it should be capable
    > of it, has trouble with 3D, which I think is down to hardware (the card),
    > as it's common to all the distros I've tried on it. I might just get a
    > 128 or even 64 meg card to put in it instead. At some point I'd like to
    > really try out this new Metisse 3D desktop thing. The rest works fine.
    >
    > I quickly decided to install GNOME. I just don't feel at home in KDE any
    > more, although I used it more often than I used GNOME back when I was last
    > a regular Mandriva user in 2005.
    >
    > The new Mandriva is a huge improvement over the old, without losing that
    > familiar Mandriva look and feel too much. The new default theme la Ora is
    > pleasant, the artwork, as in Fedora, is very much better than it used to
    > be.
    >
    > I usually go straight to Easyurpmi to set up repos, but I thought I would
    > try the new setup Mandriva has put in place for installs and updates.
    > These official repos, while pretty comprehensive, don't include things
    > like libdvdcss or the win32 codecs, and Mandriva doesn't make it as
    > straight-forward for the new user to get them, as, say, Ubuntu now does.
    > For a new user, going to Easyurpmi would probably be better, as they can
    > add repos like the plf which supply these codecs, etc. I just grabbed up
    > the libdvdcss rpm and installed it manually.
    >
    > Software installation is easy using the GUI installer, which has been
    > vastly improved from the previous version I used (2006). Obviously, the
    > choice of software available will depend on what repositories you have
    > enabled, but the selection is wide. Much as I love GNOME, I generally
    > install Kate for editing because I can't get Gedit to do static word wrap
    > (anyone know how to do that? Love to know if there *is* a way).
    >
    > Despite this not being by any means a fast PC, the distro works well on
    > it, and is not noticeably slow once the desktop has loaded. Since I
    > installed using the KDE-based Live CD, most of the apps are KDE, but
    > that's not a big problem to me. Both environments are attractive, and the
    > la Ora theme helps to blend them together. IMO, the average user may not
    > be bothered by these differences in looks anyway. Seamless integration of
    > the look and feel of KDE apps in GNOME and vice versa would be desirable,
    > but may not be entirely possible in all aspects.
    >
    > Would a less experience user be okay with Mandriva? This is a difficult
    > question to answer. It's easy to say 'yes', but we need to remember that
    > most of us in COLA are familiar with Linux in a way many novices aren't.
    > They will of course gain that familiarity in time, but at first, they may
    > be all at sea despite the great strides made in desktop usability in Linux.
    >
    > Personally, I think Mandriva is one of the most usable distros. I would
    > like to see a good book along the lines of Mandriva for Beginners,
    > including the latest available release (Linux Format has in the past put
    > out special editions of their mag with a distro included and plenty of
    > help and instruction for beginners). There are plenty of Ubuntu books and
    > several for Red Hat/Fedora, and even one for Mepis, so I see no reasons
    > omeone shouldn't do the same for Mandriva. I'd very much like to see this
    > distro regain the popularity and respect it once had.
    >
    > Would I install it now on my maoin PC? Possibly. What holds me back is not
    > the expectation of a poor performance, more that I've got SLED just as I
    > want it, and I've grown to like SUSE a lot. But I certainly don't rule it
    > out. I'm considering buying a new PC, and I would definitely rate this new
    > release worth putting on it. Mandriva has recently streamlined its
    > comercial offerings, too. It even has a pre-installed USB key version you
    > can buy.
    >
    > Overall, I would recommend the latest Mandriva to a Linux newcomer to try,
    > particularly if he tries the MandrivaOne live CD, which has non-free
    > graphics drivers, and offers compiz-fusion and metisse for those with
    > compatible graphics cards.
    >
    > It will work quite nicely on less than stellar hardware, and several other
    > less intensive window managers are available if required. All in all, a
    > very strong contender, and let's hope the trend continues, and that
    > Mandriva is over its troubles.
    >


    Nice review, but I don't see anything that jumps out at me. Is there
    any reason why I should use this distro over any of the other ones?


  3. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 00:18:09 +0000, cc wrote:

    > On Oct 21, 12:17 pm, Kier wrote:
    >> Okay, I said a while back I would do some advocacy on Mandriva's latest
    >> release. And since it's now Sunday afternoon, I have a little spare time
    >> in which to do so. It's not going to be an in-depth review or anything,
    >> just some thoughts and comments. All *sensible* feedback welcome.
    >>
    >> I used to have Mandriva, and before that Mandrake, on most of my
    >> PCs/laptops. I liked it a lot, and found it easy and pleasant to use,
    >> ideal for someone not very technically inclined. But the last really
    >> decent version I had was the 2005 LE distro. After that, it just seemed to
    >> have lost its way. I gave subequent releases a try, but none of them
    >> really came up to scratch. Finally, I switched to SUSE as my main distro,
    >> and left Mandriva behind.
    >>
    >> However, with the latest release being spoken of in glowiing terms, I
    >> decided to give my old favourite a whirl again. I downloaded the
    >> MandrivaOne KDE edition (the Gnome version hadn't come out then), and
    >> booted it up on my trusty old FrankenPC.
    >>
    >> This box is by now means state of the art, a Duron 950MHZ, with 768 MB
    >> RAM, two hard drives, CD and DVD drves, and a 256 MB nvida graphics card
    >> with I suspect is a bit too powerful for the mobo. The install went well,
    >> with partitioning a breeze using Mandriva's easy and straight-forward
    >> partioning tool - I usually manually partition my drives on this machine,
    >> with root and home, and a separate data partition on the second drive.
    >> Installation itself is not as fast as, say, Ubuntu, but quite acceptable.
    >>
    >> I had tested 3D with the live CD but this box, though it should be capable
    >> of it, has trouble with 3D, which I think is down to hardware (the card),
    >> as it's common to all the distros I've tried on it. I might just get a
    >> 128 or even 64 meg card to put in it instead. At some point I'd like to
    >> really try out this new Metisse 3D desktop thing. The rest works fine.
    >>
    >> I quickly decided to install GNOME. I just don't feel at home in KDE any
    >> more, although I used it more often than I used GNOME back when I was last
    >> a regular Mandriva user in 2005.
    >>
    >> The new Mandriva is a huge improvement over the old, without losing that
    >> familiar Mandriva look and feel too much. The new default theme la Ora is
    >> pleasant, the artwork, as in Fedora, is very much better than it used to
    >> be.
    >>
    >> I usually go straight to Easyurpmi to set up repos, but I thought I would
    >> try the new setup Mandriva has put in place for installs and updates.
    >> These official repos, while pretty comprehensive, don't include things
    >> like libdvdcss or the win32 codecs, and Mandriva doesn't make it as
    >> straight-forward for the new user to get them, as, say, Ubuntu now does.
    >> For a new user, going to Easyurpmi would probably be better, as they can
    >> add repos like the plf which supply these codecs, etc. I just grabbed up
    >> the libdvdcss rpm and installed it manually.
    >>
    >> Software installation is easy using the GUI installer, which has been
    >> vastly improved from the previous version I used (2006). Obviously, the
    >> choice of software available will depend on what repositories you have
    >> enabled, but the selection is wide. Much as I love GNOME, I generally
    >> install Kate for editing because I can't get Gedit to do static word wrap
    >> (anyone know how to do that? Love to know if there *is* a way).
    >>
    >> Despite this not being by any means a fast PC, the distro works well on
    >> it, and is not noticeably slow once the desktop has loaded. Since I
    >> installed using the KDE-based Live CD, most of the apps are KDE, but
    >> that's not a big problem to me. Both environments are attractive, and the
    >> la Ora theme helps to blend them together. IMO, the average user may not
    >> be bothered by these differences in looks anyway. Seamless integration of
    >> the look and feel of KDE apps in GNOME and vice versa would be desirable,
    >> but may not be entirely possible in all aspects.
    >>
    >> Would a less experience user be okay with Mandriva? This is a difficult
    >> question to answer. It's easy to say 'yes', but we need to remember that
    >> most of us in COLA are familiar with Linux in a way many novices aren't.
    >> They will of course gain that familiarity in time, but at first, they may
    >> be all at sea despite the great strides made in desktop usability in Linux.
    >>
    >> Personally, I think Mandriva is one of the most usable distros. I would
    >> like to see a good book along the lines of Mandriva for Beginners,
    >> including the latest available release (Linux Format has in the past put
    >> out special editions of their mag with a distro included and plenty of
    >> help and instruction for beginners). There are plenty of Ubuntu books and
    >> several for Red Hat/Fedora, and even one for Mepis, so I see no reasons
    >> omeone shouldn't do the same for Mandriva. I'd very much like to see this
    >> distro regain the popularity and respect it once had.
    >>
    >> Would I install it now on my maoin PC? Possibly. What holds me back is not
    >> the expectation of a poor performance, more that I've got SLED just as I
    >> want it, and I've grown to like SUSE a lot. But I certainly don't rule it
    >> out. I'm considering buying a new PC, and I would definitely rate this new
    >> release worth putting on it. Mandriva has recently streamlined its
    >> comercial offerings, too. It even has a pre-installed USB key version you
    >> can buy.
    >>
    >> Overall, I would recommend the latest Mandriva to a Linux newcomer to try,
    >> particularly if he tries the MandrivaOne live CD, which has non-free
    >> graphics drivers, and offers compiz-fusion and metisse for those with
    >> compatible graphics cards.
    >>
    >> It will work quite nicely on less than stellar hardware, and several other
    >> less intensive window managers are available if required. All in all, a
    >> very strong contender, and let's hope the trend continues, and that
    >> Mandriva is over its troubles.
    >>

    >
    > Nice review, but I don't see anything that jumps out at me. Is there
    > any reason why I should use this distro over any of the other ones?


    Does there have to be? Though I suppose Metisse is the only really unique
    thing, if you want to be pedantic - so far as I know, it's the only distro
    offering metisse as a default option. I would have talked more about
    metisse, but although my hardware is capable of 3D, there's a problem
    somewhere that screws up the 3D functions on this box.

    (And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    quote the entire post?)

    Why choose Mandriva over, say, Fedora, or Debian, or Ubuntu, or Slackware?
    Well, all have varying policies on installing certain things by default,
    and whether they make it easy to do so. I might well advocate Slackware or
    Debian for many reasons, but immediate user-friendliness might not be one
    of them. For instance, depending on the version of Mandriva you have (like
    MandrivaOne), Nvidia drivers can be installed by default without any
    intervention by the user - not all distros do this. Fedora and SUSE make
    this more possible but you need to do a little more work. The current
    Ubuntu probably makes this easiest now, but not everyone is wild about
    Ubuntu's default looks (don't know why it puts people off so much, myself,
    I like the orange-brown theme thing a lot).

    Were I advocating to a complete newbie I might recommend PCLOS, which is a
    close relation of Mandriva, sharing many of its best tools and a similar
    look and feel overall, or Linux Mint, which is an enhanced version of
    Ubuntu, before I mentioned Mandriva. But this current version of Mandriva
    would certainly be in the list (though I might suugest buying a powerpack
    version for the support and manuals, since beginner might get on better
    with this).

    --
    Kier




  4. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Oct 22, 4:06 am, Kier wrote:
    > On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 00:18:09 +0000, cc wrote:
    > > On Oct 21, 12:17 pm, Kier wrote:
    > >> Okay, I said a while back I would do some advocacy on Mandriva's latest
    > >> release. And since it's now Sunday afternoon, I have a little spare time
    > >> in which to do so. It's not going to be an in-depth review or anything,
    > >> just some thoughts and comments. All *sensible* feedback welcome.

    >
    > >> I used to have Mandriva, and before that Mandrake, on most of my
    > >> PCs/laptops. I liked it a lot, and found it easy and pleasant to use,
    > >> ideal for someone not very technically inclined. But the last really
    > >> decent version I had was the 2005 LE distro. After that, it just seemed to
    > >> have lost its way. I gave subequent releases a try, but none of them
    > >> really came up to scratch. Finally, I switched to SUSE as my main distro,
    > >> and left Mandriva behind.

    >
    > >> However, with the latest release being spoken of in glowiing terms, I
    > >> decided to give my old favourite a whirl again. I downloaded the
    > >> MandrivaOne KDE edition (the Gnome version hadn't come out then), and
    > >> booted it up on my trusty old FrankenPC.

    >
    > >> This box is by now means state of the art, a Duron 950MHZ, with 768 MB
    > >> RAM, two hard drives, CD and DVD drves, and a 256 MB nvida graphics card
    > >> with I suspect is a bit too powerful for the mobo. The install went well,
    > >> with partitioning a breeze using Mandriva's easy and straight-forward
    > >> partioning tool - I usually manually partition my drives on this machine,
    > >> with root and home, and a separate data partition on the second drive.
    > >> Installation itself is not as fast as, say, Ubuntu, but quite acceptable.

    >
    > >> I had tested 3D with the live CD but this box, though it should be capable
    > >> of it, has trouble with 3D, which I think is down to hardware (the card),
    > >> as it's common to all the distros I've tried on it. I might just get a
    > >> 128 or even 64 meg card to put in it instead. At some point I'd like to
    > >> really try out this new Metisse 3D desktop thing. The rest works fine.

    >
    > >> I quickly decided to install GNOME. I just don't feel at home in KDE any
    > >> more, although I used it more often than I used GNOME back when I was last
    > >> a regular Mandriva user in 2005.

    >
    > >> The new Mandriva is a huge improvement over the old, without losing that
    > >> familiar Mandriva look and feel too much. The new default theme la Ora is
    > >> pleasant, the artwork, as in Fedora, is very much better than it used to
    > >> be.

    >
    > >> I usually go straight to Easyurpmi to set up repos, but I thought I would
    > >> try the new setup Mandriva has put in place for installs and updates.
    > >> These official repos, while pretty comprehensive, don't include things
    > >> like libdvdcss or the win32 codecs, and Mandriva doesn't make it as
    > >> straight-forward for the new user to get them, as, say, Ubuntu now does.
    > >> For a new user, going to Easyurpmi would probably be better, as they can
    > >> add repos like the plf which supply these codecs, etc. I just grabbed up
    > >> the libdvdcss rpm and installed it manually.

    >
    > >> Software installation is easy using the GUI installer, which has been
    > >> vastly improved from the previous version I used (2006). Obviously, the
    > >> choice of software available will depend on what repositories you have
    > >> enabled, but the selection is wide. Much as I love GNOME, I generally
    > >> install Kate for editing because I can't get Gedit to do static word wrap
    > >> (anyone know how to do that? Love to know if there *is* a way).

    >
    > >> Despite this not being by any means a fast PC, the distro works well on
    > >> it, and is not noticeably slow once the desktop has loaded. Since I
    > >> installed using the KDE-based Live CD, most of the apps are KDE, but
    > >> that's not a big problem to me. Both environments are attractive, and the
    > >> la Ora theme helps to blend them together. IMO, the average user may not
    > >> be bothered by these differences in looks anyway. Seamless integration of
    > >> the look and feel of KDE apps in GNOME and vice versa would be desirable,
    > >> but may not be entirely possible in all aspects.

    >
    > >> Would a less experience user be okay with Mandriva? This is a difficult
    > >> question to answer. It's easy to say 'yes', but we need to remember that
    > >> most of us in COLA are familiar with Linux in a way many novices aren't.
    > >> They will of course gain that familiarity in time, but at first, they may
    > >> be all at sea despite the great strides made in desktop usability in Linux.

    >
    > >> Personally, I think Mandriva is one of the most usable distros. I would
    > >> like to see a good book along the lines of Mandriva for Beginners,
    > >> including the latest available release (Linux Format has in the past put
    > >> out special editions of their mag with a distro included and plenty of
    > >> help and instruction for beginners). There are plenty of Ubuntu books and
    > >> several for Red Hat/Fedora, and even one for Mepis, so I see no reasons
    > >> omeone shouldn't do the same for Mandriva. I'd very much like to see this
    > >> distro regain the popularity and respect it once had.

    >
    > >> Would I install it now on my maoin PC? Possibly. What holds me back is not
    > >> the expectation of a poor performance, more that I've got SLED just as I
    > >> want it, and I've grown to like SUSE a lot. But I certainly don't rule it
    > >> out. I'm considering buying a new PC, and I would definitely rate this new
    > >> release worth putting on it. Mandriva has recently streamlined its
    > >> comercial offerings, too. It even has a pre-installed USB key version you
    > >> can buy.

    >
    > >> Overall, I would recommend the latest Mandriva to a Linux newcomer to try,
    > >> particularly if he tries the MandrivaOne live CD, which has non-free
    > >> graphics drivers, and offers compiz-fusion and metisse for those with
    > >> compatible graphics cards.

    >
    > >> It will work quite nicely on less than stellar hardware, and several other
    > >> less intensive window managers are available if required. All in all, a
    > >> very strong contender, and let's hope the trend continues, and that
    > >> Mandriva is over its troubles.

    >
    > > Nice review, but I don't see anything that jumps out at me. Is there
    > > any reason why I should use this distro over any of the other ones?

    >
    > Does there have to be? Though I suppose Metisse is the only really unique
    > thing, if you want to be pedantic - so far as I know, it's the only distro
    > offering metisse as a default option. I would have talked more about
    > metisse, but although my hardware is capable of 3D, there's a problem
    > somewhere that screws up the 3D functions on this box.


    No, there doesn't have to be. Personally, I like Ubuntu and SuSE, and
    I was just wondering if there were any features that should make me
    consider Mandriva instead. 3D is cool, but personally I'm not into the
    eye candy stuff.

    > (And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    > quote the entire post?)


    Because I wanted to?

    > Why choose Mandriva over, say, Fedora, or Debian, or Ubuntu, or Slackware?
    > Well, all have varying policies on installing certain things by default,
    > and whether they make it easy to do so. I might well advocate Slackware or
    > Debian for many reasons, but immediate user-friendliness might not be one
    > of them. For instance, depending on the version of Mandriva you have (like
    > MandrivaOne), Nvidia drivers can be installed by default without any
    > intervention by the user - not all distros do this. Fedora and SUSE make
    > this more possible but you need to do a little more work. The current
    > Ubuntu probably makes this easiest now, but not everyone is wild about
    > Ubuntu's default looks (don't know why it puts people off so much, myself,
    > I like the orange-brown theme thing a lot).


    The default looks in Ubuntu bother me a little too. I think it's just
    the brown. Installing Nvidia drivers by default is a pretty good move.
    That would save some headaches for a new user.


  5. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 10:15:53 +0000, cc wrote:

    > On Oct 22, 4:06 am, Kier wrote:
    >> On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 00:18:09 +0000, cc wrote:



    > No, there doesn't have to be. Personally, I like Ubuntu and SuSE, and
    > I was just wondering if there were any features that should make me
    > consider Mandriva instead. 3D is cool, but personally I'm not into the
    > eye candy stuff.
    >
    >> (And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    >> quote the entire post?)

    >
    > Because I wanted to?


    Seems a bit silly, though, if you weren't going to comment directly on
    most of the contents.

    >
    >> Why choose Mandriva over, say, Fedora, or Debian, or Ubuntu, or Slackware?
    >> Well, all have varying policies on installing certain things by default,
    >> and whether they make it easy to do so. I might well advocate Slackware or
    >> Debian for many reasons, but immediate user-friendliness might not be one
    >> of them. For instance, depending on the version of Mandriva you have (like
    >> MandrivaOne), Nvidia drivers can be installed by default without any
    >> intervention by the user - not all distros do this. Fedora and SUSE make
    >> this more possible but you need to do a little more work. The current
    >> Ubuntu probably makes this easiest now, but not everyone is wild about
    >> Ubuntu's default looks (don't know why it puts people off so much, myself,
    >> I like the orange-brown theme thing a lot).

    >
    > The default looks in Ubuntu bother me a little too. I think it's just
    > the brown. Installing Nvidia drivers by default is a pretty good move.
    > That would save some headaches for a new user.


    Yes. These days, it's a pretty important consideration for many people.

    --
    Kier


  6. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    Kier wrote:

    >(And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    >quote the entire post?)


    He said, as he again quotes the entire post...


  7. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Oct 22, 9:25 am, chrisv wrote:
    > Kier wrote:
    > >(And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    > >quote the entire post?)

    >
    > He said, as he again quotes the entire post...


    Your man-crush on Kier is showing...


  8. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 21:36:12 +0000, cc wrote:

    > On Oct 22, 9:25 am, chrisv wrote:
    >> Kier wrote:
    >> >(And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    >> >quote the entire post?)

    >>
    >> He said, as he again quotes the entire post...

    >
    > Your man-crush on Kier is showing...


    Urrgh! Though I probably should have snipped. NOt that I give much of
    **** what that idiot chrisv thinks.

    --
    Kier


  9. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    Kier wrote:

    >On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 21:36:12 +0000, cc wrote:
    >
    >> On Oct 22, 9:25 am, chrisv wrote:
    >>> Kier wrote:
    >>> >(And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    >>> >quote the entire post?)
    >>>
    >>> He said, as he again quotes the entire post...

    >>
    >> Your man-crush on Kier is showing...

    >
    >Urrgh! Though I probably should have snipped. NOt that I give much of
    >**** what that idiot chrisv thinks.


    Yet you DO seem to care what vermin like DumFSck think, which says a
    lot about you.


  10. Re: Observations on the latest Mandriva

    On Oct 23, 8:55 am, chrisv wrote:
    > Kier wrote:
    > >On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 21:36:12 +0000, cc wrote:

    >
    > >> On Oct 22, 9:25 am, chrisv wrote:
    > >>> Kier wrote:
    > >>> >(And if you were only going to bother answering with a one-liner, why
    > >>> >quote the entire post?)

    >
    > >>> He said, as he again quotes the entire post...

    >
    > >> Your man-crush on Kier is showing...

    >
    > >Urrgh! Though I probably should have snipped. NOt that I give much of
    > >**** what that idiot chrisv thinks.

    >
    > Yet you DO seem to care what vermin like DumFSck think, which says a
    > lot about you.


    No, it says alot about you.


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